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NEWS
January 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The La Joya, Tex., school board has moved to stem the influx of students, many from Mexico, who come into the district just to attend school. The district covers 226 square miles and has 12,300 students, 99% of them Latino. Enrollment has tripled in the last decade. Administrators will be able to question a student to determine whether he or she lives in the district.
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WORLD
March 6, 2004 | Maura Reynolds and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Eighteen months after relations derailed in disputes over Iraq and the death penalty, Mexican President Vicente Fox arrived Friday for a two-day visit with President Bush at his Texas ranch, a trip designed largely to signal that the relationship is back on track. The two leaders -- both dressed in blue jeans, boots and open-collared shirts -- exchanged greetings in Spanish after Fox and his wife, Marta Sahagun, stepped out of the Marine helicopter that ferried them to the ranch.
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NEWS
May 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Houston judge postponed until September the execution of a Mexican national convicted of killing a Houston police officer in 1982. Ricardo Aldape Guerra, 30, had been scheduled to die early today. Mexican government officials attending the hearing applauded Judge Woody Densen's decision, saying they will still seek to have the execution permanently blocked. Aldape's conviction sparked a diplomatic uproar in 1982 amid claims he was wrongly found guilty and was the victim of racism.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stranger at Mike's nightclub seemed a daydream made flesh. To the men, rural Mexicans newly arrived seeking work, he had all they longed for themselves: manly good looks, fine cowboy clothes, the confidence of a rich man or maybe an Anglo. Unlike the other patrons, he didn't appear to be paying the woman beside him. He never even asked her to dance. Eyeing the light-skinned stranger from bar stools, the women just hoped he'd ask them to dance.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stranger at Mike's nightclub seemed a daydream made flesh. To the men, rural Mexicans newly arrived seeking work, he had all they longed for themselves: manly good looks, fine cowboy clothes, the confidence of a rich man or maybe an Anglo. Unlike the other patrons, he didn't appear to be paying the woman beside him. He never even asked her to dance. Eyeing the light-skinned stranger from bar stools, the women just hoped he'd ask them to dance.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of the nation is suffering through a recession-plagued holiday season, business is booming in--of all places--this border city, one of America's poorest metropolitan areas. Shoppers wheel dollies stacked with merchandise down Convent Street, the main drag extending from the bridge spanning the Rio Grande. Customers snatch electric mixers off the floor at Lazaro's electronics store as quickly as harried stock clerks can put them out.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1985 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
After a yearlong search for a transfusion of money, United Press International's management, union and creditors agreed Tuesday to sell the debt-ridden news agency to Mexican newspaper publisher Mario Vazquez-Rana and Houston real estate developer Joe Russo for a sum estimated at $10 million to $25 million. That sale agreement now requires the approval of the federal bankruptcy judge in Washington who is overseeing the financial reorganization of the wire service.
WORLD
March 6, 2004 | Maura Reynolds and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
Eighteen months after relations derailed in disputes over Iraq and the death penalty, Mexican President Vicente Fox arrived Friday for a two-day visit with President Bush at his Texas ranch, a trip designed largely to signal that the relationship is back on track. The two leaders -- both dressed in blue jeans, boots and open-collared shirts -- exchanged greetings in Spanish after Fox and his wife, Marta Sahagun, stepped out of the Marine helicopter that ferried them to the ranch.
NEWS
July 8, 1990
Although I do not come from Ecuador, and West San Antonio was my barrio and not Carmelitos Housing Project, I also lived through the exhilaration of earning a perfect high school academic transcript (San Antonio Vocational and Technical High School, now "Fox High") in June, 1956, and shortly afterward found myself "young, talented and Mexican" at Texas A & M and Rice universities. (The term Hispanics had not yet been "invented.") We had no trouble in calling ourselves poor Mexicans in Texas.
NEWS
July 13, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their votes won't count, but millions of Mexicans living in the United States will be given a chance to cast ballots, at least symbolically, in the July 2000 Mexican presidential election. Orange County business executive Carlos Olamendi said Monday that California-based activists met with Mexican legislators and electoral officials seeking their support for the alternative ballot. But with or without their backing, Olamendi declared, it will take place at 300 voting booths to be set up in U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The La Joya, Tex., school board has moved to stem the influx of students, many from Mexico, who come into the district just to attend school. The district covers 226 square miles and has 12,300 students, 99% of them Latino. Enrollment has tripled in the last decade. Administrators will be able to question a student to determine whether he or she lives in the district.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Houston judge postponed until September the execution of a Mexican national convicted of killing a Houston police officer in 1982. Ricardo Aldape Guerra, 30, had been scheduled to die early today. Mexican government officials attending the hearing applauded Judge Woody Densen's decision, saying they will still seek to have the execution permanently blocked. Aldape's conviction sparked a diplomatic uproar in 1982 amid claims he was wrongly found guilty and was the victim of racism.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of the nation is suffering through a recession-plagued holiday season, business is booming in--of all places--this border city, one of America's poorest metropolitan areas. Shoppers wheel dollies stacked with merchandise down Convent Street, the main drag extending from the bridge spanning the Rio Grande. Customers snatch electric mixers off the floor at Lazaro's electronics store as quickly as harried stock clerks can put them out.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1985 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL and KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writers
After a yearlong search for a transfusion of money, United Press International's management, union and creditors agreed Tuesday to sell the debt-ridden news agency to Mexican newspaper publisher Mario Vazquez-Rana and Houston real estate developer Joe Russo for a sum estimated at $10 million to $25 million. That sale agreement now requires the approval of the federal bankruptcy judge in Washington who is overseeing the financial reorganization of the wire service.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1995 | RODOLFO ACUNA, Rodolfo F. Acuna, Ph.D., teaches Chicano Studies at Cal State Northridge and is the author of "Occupied America: A History of Chicanos" and the forthcoming "Anything but Mexican: Chicanos in Contemporary Los Angeles."
Since Eugene A. Taylor Jr. decided to drag me into his May 8 Counterpunch regarding Howard Rosenberg's review of James A. Michener's "Texas" ("Review of 'Texas' Fails to Set the Record Straight,") I must reply. Without a doubt I can assert that the Alamo, the historical center of Michener's "Texas," is probably the single most important source of racism toward Mexicans in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1986 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
The statue of the "patron saint of migrants going to the United States," as Mexicans affectionately call the Virgin of San Juan de los Lagos, came to a small barrio church in Pacoima this week and thousands who have made the northward journey came to celebrate her visit. The small wooden figure that, according to legend, was carved in 1629 as a duplicate of another statue of the Virgin Mary that brought a dead girl back to life, came to Guardian Angel Church for three days.
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