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NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
Halloween is my favorite time of year. And I love to be scared. Over the years, I've been through my fair share of theme park mazes, independent haunted attractions and backyard spookfests. I even dress up every Halloween as a chainsaw-wielding maniac in a hockey mask and scare the neighborhood kids at the haunted house on our block. So I like to think I've seen it all - from the mundane to the extreme. But I've never experienced anything like McKamey Manor . > Photos: Inside the McKamey Manor backyard haunt in San Diego On Friday night I went through the backyard haunt tucked behind the three-bedroom, brick-and-stucco home of Russ and Carol McKamey in an otherwise ordinary San Diego subdivision near Poway.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Homero Aridjis
The first time I met Gabriel García Márquez, then an unknown writer in Mexico, was on July 6, 1962, in the office of the producer of Luis Buñuel's movie "Viridiana. " I remember the date well because after noticing the headline, Gabo asked to borrow the evening paper I had just bought, exclaiming "Dammit, today my master died," referring to William Faulkner. Faulkner famously detested intrusions in his private life, and the funeral in his native Oxford, Miss., was sparsely attended by several dozen family members, his publishers and a few writers.
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WORLD
August 9, 2008 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
In Mexico's drug war, Gen. Sergio Aponte Polito racked up crime-fighting credentials worthy of the Dark Knight, making record seizures of drugs and weapons and forcing out top Baja California law enforcement officials he accused of corruption and of having links to organized crime.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The image of bandit Jesus Malverde turns up as a kind of venerated saint inside " Quitapesares (Solace)," a makeshift chapel by artist Maria Romero erected near the end of a large new exhibition at the UCLA Fowler Museum. On May 3, 1909, the outlaw was hanged from a tree in the town of Culiacán, capital of Sinaloa near the country's northwest coast, by the federal government of Mexican dictator Porfirio Diaz. He was left to rot in the sun. At least, that's what people say. Historians have found no evidence that the story is true.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
A new hotel and several other tourist facilities are scheduled to open during the upcoming year in Riviera Nayarit , one of Mexico 's newest coastal developments. Several resorts in the region, which is north of Puerto Vallarta, also plan to add rooms or make other improvements. "Riviera Nayarit has seen remarkable growth in the development of tourism infrastructure and offerings since our inception in 2007," said Richard Zarkin, public relations manager of Riviera Nayarit Convention and Visitors Bureau.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Grupo Televisa, the world's largest Spanish-language broadcaster, said Tuesday that it was seeking to acquire DirecTV Group Inc.'s subscribers in Mexico to become the country's only provider for satellite television service. "We would like to buy DirecTV's subscribers in Mexico but not the whole company," said Alfonso de Angoitia, Televisa's executive vice president, during a second-quarter conference call. "Hopefully, that will be during 2004, but I cannot comment on specific negotiations."
NEWS
December 1, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
Amy Neiman and her husband, Alan, were in Mexico in November during the Dia de Los Muertos holiday. Near the Templo de Santo Domingo de Guzmán in Oaxaca, they saw people gathered for a parade, and one couple in particular stood out. "I was struck by the colors, the creativity, the seriousness of the young people," Neiman said. The woman's gown is made from Styrofoam cups, paper plates and plastic utensils. The Venice resident used an iPhone 4S.  To submit your photos, click the upload button below.
WORLD
June 7, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Wo jiao Alberto. Wo jiao Maribel. Ni ji sui? Alberto and Maribel, sixth-graders at the Pedro Garcia Rojas elementary school here in central Mexico, introduce themselves to each other in Mandarin Chinese. Their class also recites numbers, clothing items and weather conditions in a language that, to them, is about as foreign as it gets. Some, like Damaris De Luna Sanchez, 11, move their hands the way a conductor directs an orchestra, slicing through the air to help them reach the proper intonations, the staccato flats and singsong vowelish sounds.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Every morning during television coverage of the World Cup, on the Mexican equivalent of the "Today" show, co-hosts chat, trade barbs and yuck it up. Behind them, actors in blackface makeup, dressed in fake animal skins and wild "Afro" wigs, gyrate, wave spears and pretend to represent a cartoonish version of South Africa. Yes, in the 21st century, blackface characters on a major television network. But this is Mexico, and definitions of racism are complicated and influenced by the country's own tortured relationship with invading powers and indigenous cultures.
WORLD
May 27, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
CULIACAN, Mexico - The cartel henchman nicknamed "El Loco" was reported behind the latest atrocity in Mexico's ever-more-depraved drug war: mutilating 49 people and piling their bodies - heads, hands and feet missing - by the side of a road leading to the U.S. border. Authorities say he acted this month on orders from the top commanders of the brutal Zeta paramilitary force, who wanted to send a message to the long-dominant Sinaloa cartel and its allies, in a new phase of a conflict that has claimed more than 50,000 lives in less than six years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel laureate who died in Mexico City on Thursday, has been cremated and his ashes could be shared between two countries, according to Mexican media reports . The Colombian novelist spent five decades of his life in Mexico but never gave up his Colombian citizenship. On Friday, Colombia's ambassador to Mexico, Jose Gabriel Ortiz, told reporters gathered outside the late author's Mexico City home that part of his remains might return to Colombia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
A television broadcast captured Mexico City's early earthquake warning system working successfully Friday, giving TV viewers in the capital more than a minute of warning before major shaking from a magnitude 7.2 earthquake rumbled into the city. California still lacks an early quake warning system as state and federal lawmakers haven't agreed to pay for the $16 million-a-year system.  The Mexican warning system could be seen on television (video below), when news announcer Eduardo Salazar calmly tells viewers that at 9:27 a.m. a seismic alert went off, triggering a shrieking whine on the broadcast.
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A powerful earthquake shook a wide area of Mexico on Friday, terrifying residents and sending many fleeing into the streets. There were no initial reports of serious injuries or major damage in the capital. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, which occurred about 9:30 a.m., had a preliminary magnitude of 7.2, which would make it one of the stronger temblors registered in Mexico City in several years. It was 14 miles deep and was felt in nine of Mexico's 31 states, in addition to the capital, according to the agency, with the epicenter in the coastal state of Guerrero about 200 miles southwest of the capital.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
A magnitude 7.2 temblor hit Mexico on Friday, with shaking felt across much of the country. Is it just me, oh fellow residents of La La Land, or does it feel like - in earthquake-speak  - the Big One is getting just a little too close for comfort? No, no, I'm not basing this on some new scientific theory. Conversely, no, my cat has not been acting oddly. It's just that, well, there's been a whole lot of shaking going on lately.    Friday's Mexico quake came on the heels of the magnitude 8.2 temblor that rocked Chile on April 1. And then there's the recent swarm of quakes in central Utah , the largest being a magnitude 4.9 on April 13. Plus, of course, Los Angeles' own “little” shaker on March 28, a magnitude 5.1 quake that rattled buildings - and nerves - across the region.
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, This post has been updated with the latest developments.
MEXICO CITY -- A powerful earthquake shook a wide area of Mexico on Friday, terrifying residents and sending many fleeing into the streets. There were no initial reports of injuries and only minor damage in the capital, though information from elsewhere in central Mexico was still coming in. The United States Geological Survey said the quake at about 9:30 a.m. local time had a preliminary magnitude of 7.2, which would make it one of the stronger...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
Mexico City had 71 seconds of warning before shaking from a 7.2 earthquake about 200 miles away rumbled into the capital, thanks to central Mexico's 21-year-old early quake warning system, officials said Friday. It's a system that California still lacks. The Mexican warning system could be seen on television (video below), when Televisa news announcer Eduardo Salazar calmly tells viewers that at 9:27 a.m. a seismic alert went off, triggering a shrieking whine on the broadcast.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Things are looking up for tourism in Mazatlan, Mexico . The Pacific Coast resort , with 20-plus miles of beaches and dozens of high-end resorts, has long been a favorite with American tourists. Mexico's ongoing drug war, however, caused concern on both sides of the border. But recent infrastructure changes, coupled with an overhaul of Mazatlan's police force, have quieted fears. Now the Mexican Riviera city has just had its best spring season ever and is poised to have a record-breaking summer season, according to tourism bureau statistics.
OPINION
October 18, 1987
Three cheers for Charles McC. Mathias Jr.! Stability in this hemisphere very much depends on how the United States views and responds to Mexico (Op-Ed Page, Oct. 12). The Mexico/U.S. relationship is just one more reason to support Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez' attempts for a nonviolent resolution of conflict in Central America. Mathias also points out the need for adopting a right course regarding trade with Mexico and acknowledging our economic interdependency; it is reassuring to note that Democratic candidates Bruce Babbit and Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.
WORLD
April 17, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A highly touted system to protect Mexican reporters working in one of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists is failing miserably and may in fact further imperil those it is intended to help, media advocates say. In the first year of the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto, killings of journalists declined significantly but other attacks multiplied, organizations that work on behalf of reporters said....
WORLD
April 16, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Mexico's drug and corruption crackdown intensified this week with the arrests of the reputed second in command of the Beltran Leyva drug cartel and the mayor of a Michoacan city once controlled by the Knights Templar criminal gang. The detention Tuesday of Uriel Chavez Mendoza, the mayor of Apatzingan, could help government officials persuade the “self-defense” militias in the western state of Michoacan to comply with a newly minted agreement to disband by May 10. Tension between the armed citizen militias and the Knights Templar, a cult-like criminal organization, has made Michoacan one of the most sensitive security problems for the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto.
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