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NEWS
July 23, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
If life has been too hectic for you to plan a summer vacation, time may be running out. But the good news for procrastinators: Mexico still has some red-hot deals, according to the website TravelZoo . Some Mexico beach destinations are offering as much as 60% off. “Summer means low season pricing in Mexico,” said Gabe Saglie, a Travelzoo senior editor. “Popular destinations like Cancun and Cabo San Lucas benefit from a lot of airfare competition, as well as a lot of competition among resorts on the ground.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
April 6, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - When Wynema and Michael Gonzagowski moved to town about two years ago, family and friends warned them about what they described as the heavy-handed tactics and aggressive attitude of Albuquerque police. At first the couple brushed off the warnings, saying things couldn't be as bad as what they had experienced in Los Angeles in the LAPD's Rampart Division, which became infamous for corruption in its anti-gang unit in the 1990s. But the Gonzagowskis, like others here, began to grow suspicious of their Police Department.
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WORLD
August 9, 2008 | Richard Marosi, Times Staff Writer
In Mexico's drug war, Gen. Sergio Aponte Polito racked up crime-fighting credentials worthy of the Dark Knight, making record seizures of drugs and weapons and forcing out top Baja California law enforcement officials he accused of corruption and of having links to organized crime.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Mexican federal authorities have detained the interior minister of Michoacan state after determining that he has "possible contacts with criminal organizations," according to a statement released by prosecutors Saturday night. The aggressive action against Interior Minister Jesus Reyna, is a sign that the federal government, which has struggled for months to control the drug-plagued state, is considering the possibility that the influence of narcotics trafficking has spread nearly to the pinnacle of state government.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Grupo Televisa, the world's largest Spanish-language broadcaster, said Tuesday that it was seeking to acquire DirecTV Group Inc.'s subscribers in Mexico to become the country's only provider for satellite television service. "We would like to buy DirecTV's subscribers in Mexico but not the whole company," said Alfonso de Angoitia, Televisa's executive vice president, during a second-quarter conference call. "Hopefully, that will be during 2004, but I cannot comment on specific negotiations."
WORLD
May 27, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
CULIACAN, Mexico - The cartel henchman nicknamed "El Loco" was reported behind the latest atrocity in Mexico's ever-more-depraved drug war: mutilating 49 people and piling their bodies - heads, hands and feet missing - by the side of a road leading to the U.S. border. Authorities say he acted this month on orders from the top commanders of the brutal Zeta paramilitary force, who wanted to send a message to the long-dominant Sinaloa cartel and its allies, in a new phase of a conflict that has claimed more than 50,000 lives in less than six years.
WORLD
April 5, 2008 | Deborah Bonello and Reed Johnson, Special to The Times
The latest advertising campaign in Mexico from Swedish vodka maker Absolut seemed to push all the right buttons south of the U.S. border, but it ruffled a few feathers in El Norte. As word of the campaign spread across the border, primarily via the Internet, some in the United States began giving the campaign a much more hostile reception.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and Richard Fausset
The first Honda Fit rolled off the assembly line Friday at a new $800-million factory near Celaya, Mexico, a symbol of the growing might of the country's auto industry. Honda's U.S. factories spit out hundreds of thousands of Accords and Civics each year. But when the automaker redesigned the Fit for North America, it turned to Mexico for an increasingly skilled workforce and favorable export rules. Mexico already accounts for about 18% of North American auto production, but that's expected to jump to 25% by 2020 as automakers pour billion of dollars into factories, said Joe Langley, an analyst at IHS Automotive.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
HERMOSILLO, Mexico - The temperature was climbing past 100 degrees, humidity not far behind. Mexican actor Diego Luna, in the director's chair for a change, was trying to re-create 1960s California on a set in this industrial city in Mexico's northern Sonora state. The performers' wigs were wilting, their brows brilliant with sweaty shine. Vintage suits in unbreathable polyester double-knit didn't help. Yet tempers remained surprisingly calm as scenes were shot over and over.
WORLD
February 27, 2014
BY SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER TIMES PHOTOGRAPHS BY DON BARTLETTI he boy does not understand. His mother is not talking to him. She will not even look at him. Enrique has no hint of what she is going to do. Lourdes knows. She understands, as only a mother can, the terror she is about to inflict, the ache Enrique will feel and finally the emptiness. What will become of him? Already he will not let anyone else feed or bathe him. He loves her deeply, as only a son can. With Lourdes, he is a chatterbox.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
TAPACHULA, Mexico - The last time Norman Varela made an unauthorized crossing into Mexico, he was headed to the United States, in search of a job, riding atop the infamous northbound freight train known as La Bestia - the Beast. Mexican policemen robbed the Honduran of his savings en route, he said. Later, on the night of Oct. 29, 2005, a rumor spread that more bad men were coming. As Varela made his escape, he ducked under a freight car. It rolled over his right leg, severing it at the knee.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - The government of President Enrique Peña Nieto says a proposed new telecommunications law would finally break up Mexico's powerful and much-criticized TV and telephone monopolies. The proposal and other reforms have generated considerable praise abroad for Peña Nieto and his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which ruled the country for seven decades before a 12-year hiatus and a return to power in late 2012. But a growing number of domestic critics are reading the fine print of the telecommunications plan and finding many things to worry about.
FOOD
March 27, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Terroir . Wild yeasts. Elevation. Who knew these terms could apply to mezcal as easily as to wine. In fact, "the vocabulary of mezcal is more like the vocabulary of wine than spirits," explains Ron Cooper, the California artist who founded Del Maguey single-village mezcals 20 years ago when the beverage wasn't on anybody's radar. "We're talking about terroir , about mouth feel," he says. "We're talking about aroma, nose. " He can go on for hours, recounting the long history of mezcal made in remote villages hours off dirt roads.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
LOS ALGODONES, Mexico - The mighty Colorado River, which over millenniums has carved the Grand Canyon, does an unusual thing when it gets south of the Arizona-Mexico border. It dies. The Morelos Dam - sitting on the international boundary - serves as its headstone, diverting nearly all of the river water into an aqueduct that serves agriculture as well as homes in Tijuana. South of the dam, the river channel travels about 75 miles to the Gulf of California. Except when filled by rains, the channel is bone dry. But starting Sunday, the river will flow again, part of an unprecedented experiment by U.S. and Mexican officials.
SPORTS
March 20, 2014 | Chris Dufresne
SPOKANE, Wash. - San Diego State had, by far, the scariest time slot in Spokane. The Aztecs played the last Thursday night game on what had to seem like the longest day of the year. Boy was it ever. Spokane Arena, by the time the Aztecs tipped off, had been the scene of high-major carnage. The upset ghosts were already wafting in the woodwork and catacombs. Two No. 12-seeded schools, Harvard from the East region and North Dakota State from the West, had already sent home a pair of fives - Cincinnati and Oklahoma.
SPORTS
March 15, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Paul Arriola probably isn't the most representative example of a Mexican soccer player. Born in California, he played for two U.S. national teams and, as a teen, trained at the Galaxy's academy in Carson. Though he could see Mexico from his house in Chula Vista, he never spent much time there and his Spanish is very much a work in progress. But Arriola, in his second year with the Tijuana Xolos, is representative of the direction Mexican soccer is headed. Because in recent years that country's top club teams have recruited dozens of U.S. citizens just like him to come play south of the border - something that would once have been unthinkable.
MAGAZINE
June 25, 2006 | Ruben Martinez, Ruben Martinez is the author of "Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail" and "The New Americans: Seven Families Journey to Another Country." This adapted excerpt is from Ruben Martinez's upcoming book, "Burning Sand" (Metropolitan Books). Copyright 2006 by Ruben Martinez.
I am, again, on the line. I've been drawn to it my entire life, beginning with frequent childhood jaunts across it to Tijuana and back--that leap from the monochrome suburban grids of Southern California to the Technicolor swirl of urban Baja California and back. I am an American today because of that line--and my parents' will to erase it with their desire. I return to it again and again because I am from both sides.
WORLD
July 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Every morning during television coverage of the World Cup, on the Mexican equivalent of the "Today" show, co-hosts chat, trade barbs and yuck it up. Behind them, actors in blackface makeup, dressed in fake animal skins and wild "Afro" wigs, gyrate, wave spears and pretend to represent a cartoonish version of South Africa. Yes, in the 21st century, blackface characters on a major television network. But this is Mexico, and definitions of racism are complicated and influenced by the country's own tortured relationship with invading powers and indigenous cultures.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2014 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Last month, after years of futile goose-chasing, Mexican authorities captured the country's most-wanted criminal, the powerful Sinaloa drug cartel boss Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán. But another legendary Mexican desperado remains at large after 40 years, haunting the fantasies of an adoring public. She's Camelia la Texana, a comely San Antonio ingenue turned drug-smuggling queen who shot and killed her lover in a jealous rage. At least that's her story as immortalized in "Contrabando y Traición" ("Contraband and Betrayal")
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Mexican commuters are furious over a disastrous design failure that has forced the closure of one of this huge city's busiest and newest subway lines. Nearly half a million passengers have had to find alternative transportation after officials shut down most of Line 12, which runs about 15 miles from south of the capital toward its heart. It could take six months or more to repair all of the damage, said officials, who attributed most of the problems to train wheels that are incompatible with the rails.
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