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January 26, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberto Limon Padilla started with a shabby clapboard store in a working-class neighborhood. He went on to build Tijuana's first shopping mall and today presides over a business empire. Aurora Pelayo came to Tijuana a penniless single mother to work in a factory. Today she is secretary-general of the Baja California Democratic Revolutionary Party. Justina and Rafael Brambila opened a street-side taco stand, La Especial, on Avenida Revolucion when they came from Jalisco in 1948.
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OPINION
April 27, 2014 | By Homero Aridjis
The first time I met Gabriel García Márquez, then an unknown writer in Mexico, was on July 6, 1962, in the office of the producer of Luis Buñuel's movie "Viridiana. " I remember the date well because after noticing the headline, Gabo asked to borrow the evening paper I had just bought, exclaiming "Dammit, today my master died," referring to William Faulkner. Faulkner famously detested intrusions in his private life, and the funeral in his native Oxford, Miss., was sparsely attended by several dozen family members, his publishers and a few writers.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Mexico's top mafia chiefs, Emilio Quintero Payan, was shot to death by police in a suburban shopping center on the outskirts of Mexico City, U.S. and Mexican officials confirmed Monday. Quintero Payan, who allegedly ran heroin, cocaine and marijuana smuggling operations from his home state of Sinaloa, was killed Thursday, a day after the former attorney general of Sinaloa was gunned down in a Mexico City park. Officials are still investigating what seem to be links between the two cases.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
The author and journalist Elena Poniatowska, who gained fame in Mexico for her chronicles of social injustice and government repression, is this year's winner of the Miguel de Cervantes Prize, the most prestigious literary prize in the Spanish language. Poniatowska, 82, has penned more than three dozen books, including several novels, children's books, essay collections, and works of nonfiction, including “La Noche de Tlatelolco,” (“The Night of Tlatelolco”) a groundbreaking oral history of the 1968 army massacre of student protesters in Mexico City.
WORLD
August 30, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The thousands of teachers who have been jamming the streets in this congested capital city for nearly two weeks to protest an education reform package have no immediate plans to leave, and the threat of their continued presence is prompting calls for the government to forcibly move them out. The teachers, members of the National Coordinator of Education Workers, or CNTE, have been marching daily and blocking major thoroughfares, trying...
WORLD
July 27, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
They're calling for rain today, but that's no surprise. Predicting rain on a summer day in Mexico City is like forecasting death in an old-folks home. It's bound to happen. From springtime to autumn, it rains a lot here. Let me be clear: a lot. The Mexico City government issues the same monotonous forecast each day: 80% or higher chance of rain. The only suspense is whether it will come with lightning or hail. It's the same almost every afternoon — you could set a clock, if the power hasn't been knocked out. People schedule outdoor parties early, knowing that by late afternoon, the storm clouds will prevail.
WORLD
December 6, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- The city that was once considered one of the world's  most polluted  and crime-ridden now boasts that it is a haven from Mexico's drug violence and has gone so "green" with new mass transit lines and  trendy vertical gardens that it is hardly recognizable from its former self. Miguel Angel Mancera, the newly sworn-in mayor, vowed this week to continue the socially progressive policies of his predecessor and make Mexico's gargantuan capital "safer, freer, more equal, more progressive" during his next six years in office.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
A group of Honduran men who lost limbs during their transit through Mexico on the train known as La Bestia (the Beast) have been granted permission to travel to the Mexican capital to protest the treatment of migrants bound for the U.S., the group's president said Saturday. The men had entered Mexico illegally through Guatemala in late March. They had been asking the Mexican government to let them travel to Mexico City with letters that would instruct immigration officials not to deport them during that journey.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
A half a century ago, a somewhat obscure Colombian writer resettled in that teeming cauldron of culture and humanity called Mexico City. He had just published a novel that was a modest success back home, and was starting on another he thought was pretty good, a historical epic set in a fictional small town in Colombia's banana-growing region. The as-yet-unfinished novel was called "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and the author was the future Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
MEXICO CITY - Nineteen people were killed and 36 injured Tuesday morning when a gas tanker truck crashed and exploded, damaging dozens of homes in the densely populated Mexico City suburb of Ecatepec, according to authorities and news reports. The accident occurred about 5:30 a.m. on a highway connecting the Mexican capital with Pachuca. [For the record, 12:42 p.m., May 7: An earlier version of this post incorrectly gave the name of this city as Pachuco. ] Photos showed cars and trucks on fire.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Gabriel García Márquez, the Nobel laureate who died in Mexico City on Thursday, has been cremated and his ashes could be shared between two countries, according to Mexican media reports . The Colombian novelist spent five decades of his life in Mexico but never gave up his Colombian citizenship. On Friday, Colombia's ambassador to Mexico, Jose Gabriel Ortiz, told reporters gathered outside the late author's Mexico City home that part of his remains might return to Colombia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
A television broadcast captured Mexico City's early earthquake warning system working successfully Friday, giving TV viewers in the capital more than a minute of warning before major shaking from a magnitude 7.2 earthquake rumbled into the city. California still lacks an early quake warning system as state and federal lawmakers haven't agreed to pay for the $16 million-a-year system.  The Mexican warning system could be seen on television (video below), when news announcer Eduardo Salazar calmly tells viewers that at 9:27 a.m. a seismic alert went off, triggering a shrieking whine on the broadcast.
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson, This post has been updated with the latest developments.
MEXICO CITY -- A powerful earthquake shook a wide area of Mexico on Friday, terrifying residents and sending many fleeing into the streets. There were no initial reports of injuries and only minor damage in the capital, though information from elsewhere in central Mexico was still coming in. The United States Geological Survey said the quake at about 9:30 a.m. local time had a preliminary magnitude of 7.2, which would make it one of the stronger...
WORLD
April 18, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A powerful earthquake shook a wide area of Mexico on Friday, terrifying residents and sending many fleeing into the streets. There were no initial reports of serious injuries or major damage in the capital. The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, which occurred about 9:30 a.m., had a preliminary magnitude of 7.2, which would make it one of the stronger temblors registered in Mexico City in several years. It was 14 miles deep and was felt in nine of Mexico's 31 states, in addition to the capital, according to the agency, with the epicenter in the coastal state of Guerrero about 200 miles southwest of the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Hector Becerra
Mexico City had 71 seconds of warning before shaking from a 7.2 earthquake about 200 miles away rumbled into the capital, thanks to central Mexico's 21-year-old early quake warning system, officials said Friday. It's a system that California still lacks. The Mexican warning system could be seen on television (video below), when Televisa news announcer Eduardo Salazar calmly tells viewers that at 9:27 a.m. a seismic alert went off, triggering a shrieking whine on the broadcast.
WORLD
April 17, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A highly touted system to protect Mexican reporters working in one of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists is failing miserably and may in fact further imperil those it is intended to help, media advocates say. In the first year of the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto, killings of journalists declined significantly but other attacks multiplied, organizations that work on behalf of reporters said....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Looks like Mexican rocker Ely Guerra is changing her image again. In the process, she may help buff up the image of one of the world's most misunderstood capitals: Mexico City. According to the Mexico City newspaper El Universal , the musician -- a female pioneer of Spanish-language alternative rock -- has been recruited this season to be a spokesperson and frontwoman for the Campaña de Verano (Summer Campaign) by the secretary of tourism for the Distrito Federal, or Mexican Federal District (Mexico City)
WORLD
November 23, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- That big, hulking statue of the Caucasian strongman has got to go. Such was the recommendation Friday of a special committee appointed to resolve one of the odder controversies to beset this capital. At issue: the city government's decision to allow Azerbaijan to erect a monument to its late president, Heydar Aliyev, on the iconic Reforma Boulevard, prime real estate in the sprawling megalopolis. The bronze and marble statue generated protests and a running debate in the media.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Mexican federal authorities have detained the interior minister of Michoacan state after determining that he has "possible contacts with criminal organizations," according to a statement released by prosecutors Saturday night. The aggressive action against Interior Minister Jesus Reyna, is a sign that the federal government, which has struggled for months to control the drug-plagued state, is considering the possibility that the influence of narcotics trafficking has spread nearly to the pinnacle of state government.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
A group of Honduran men who lost limbs during their transit through Mexico on the train known as La Bestia (the Beast) have been granted permission to travel to the Mexican capital to protest the treatment of migrants bound for the U.S., the group's president said Saturday. The men had entered Mexico illegally through Guatemala in late March. They had been asking the Mexican government to let them travel to Mexico City with letters that would instruct immigration officials not to deport them during that journey.
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