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January 26, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alberto Limon Padilla started with a shabby clapboard store in a working-class neighborhood. He went on to build Tijuana's first shopping mall and today presides over a business empire. Aurora Pelayo came to Tijuana a penniless single mother to work in a factory. Today she is secretary-general of the Baja California Democratic Revolutionary Party. Justina and Rafael Brambila opened a street-side taco stand, La Especial, on Avenida Revolucion when they came from Jalisco in 1948.
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WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Mexican federal authorities have detained the interior minister of Michoacan state after determining that he has "possible contacts with criminal organizations," according to a statement released by prosecutors Saturday night. The aggressive action against Interior Minister Jesus Reyna, is a sign that the federal government, which has struggled for months to control the drug-plagued state, is considering the possibility that the influence of narcotics trafficking has spread nearly to the pinnacle of state government.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Mexico's top mafia chiefs, Emilio Quintero Payan, was shot to death by police in a suburban shopping center on the outskirts of Mexico City, U.S. and Mexican officials confirmed Monday. Quintero Payan, who allegedly ran heroin, cocaine and marijuana smuggling operations from his home state of Sinaloa, was killed Thursday, a day after the former attorney general of Sinaloa was gunned down in a Mexico City park. Officials are still investigating what seem to be links between the two cases.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Mexican commuters are furious over a disastrous design failure that has forced the closure of one of this huge city's busiest and newest subway lines. Nearly half a million passengers have had to find alternative transportation after officials shut down most of Line 12, which runs about 15 miles from south of the capital toward its heart. It could take six months or more to repair all of the damage, said officials, who attributed most of the problems to train wheels that are incompatible with the rails.
WORLD
August 30, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - The thousands of teachers who have been jamming the streets in this congested capital city for nearly two weeks to protest an education reform package have no immediate plans to leave, and the threat of their continued presence is prompting calls for the government to forcibly move them out. The teachers, members of the National Coordinator of Education Workers, or CNTE, have been marching daily and blocking major thoroughfares, trying...
WORLD
July 27, 2010 | Los Angeles Times
They're calling for rain today, but that's no surprise. Predicting rain on a summer day in Mexico City is like forecasting death in an old-folks home. It's bound to happen. From springtime to autumn, it rains a lot here. Let me be clear: a lot. The Mexico City government issues the same monotonous forecast each day: 80% or higher chance of rain. The only suspense is whether it will come with lightning or hail. It's the same almost every afternoon — you could set a clock, if the power hasn't been knocked out. People schedule outdoor parties early, knowing that by late afternoon, the storm clouds will prevail.
WORLD
April 12, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Skull motifs. Dollar bills pasted on a wall. Phrases written in neon lights. Figures cut out of photographs. Or, if you like, a bunch of lines on paper. It's hardly surprising that the offerings at Zona Maco , the Mexico City contemporary art bazaar that opened its 10th edition Wednesday, tend to look and feel like the art for sale at any other big fair. Many of the galleries with showcases at the glitzy five-day event are visiting from established art centers like New York or Milan.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Hector Tobar
A half a century ago, a somewhat obscure Colombian writer resettled in that teeming cauldron of culture and humanity called Mexico City. He had just published a novel that was a modest success back home, and was starting on another he thought was pretty good, a historical epic set in a fictional small town in Colombia's banana-growing region. The as-yet-unfinished novel was called "One Hundred Years of Solitude" and the author was the future Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
WORLD
December 6, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- The city that was once considered one of the world's  most polluted  and crime-ridden now boasts that it is a haven from Mexico's drug violence and has gone so "green" with new mass transit lines and  trendy vertical gardens that it is hardly recognizable from its former self. Miguel Angel Mancera, the newly sworn-in mayor, vowed this week to continue the socially progressive policies of his predecessor and make Mexico's gargantuan capital "safer, freer, more equal, more progressive" during his next six years in office.
WORLD
May 7, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
MEXICO CITY - Nineteen people were killed and 36 injured Tuesday morning when a gas tanker truck crashed and exploded, damaging dozens of homes in the densely populated Mexico City suburb of Ecatepec, according to authorities and news reports. The accident occurred about 5:30 a.m. on a highway connecting the Mexican capital with Pachuca. [For the record, 12:42 p.m., May 7: An earlier version of this post incorrectly gave the name of this city as Pachuco. ] Photos showed cars and trucks on fire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
Rosa Quirino liked to perform with leather huaraches on her feet and a shawl criss-crossed over her chest, in a nod to Pancho Villa. When men teased her as she sang, she would tell them: "Gentlemen, we are working. " Then, she'd pull out her gun. The year was 1903, and Doña Rosa, a mariachi from Mexico who began playing violin at age 13, was a rare sight. Her story and others are being featured in an exhibit this month at the San Gabriel Mission Playhouse. The show covers more than a century of history surrounding female mariachis: ladies who found success - starring on television, scoring sponsors and performing internationally - at a time when the Mexican music genre was ruled entirely by men. "They were seen, they were heard, they performed in front of thousands of people," said Leonor Xochitl Perez, the exhibit's organizer.
WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - When historians write about 21st century Los Angeles, they'll probably observe that Eric Garcetti was the second Spanish-speaking L.A. mayor in a row to make an official visit to the Mexican capital. They may also note how trips such as his trade mission this week reflected the increasingly intimate cultural and economic ties between Los Angeles and its sister megalopolis to the south. But some of the subtleties of the experience may be lost to posterity if it is not also noted that Garcetti, like his predecessor, Antonio Villaraigosa, speaks a version of the language that, for lack of a more scientific term, might be called Funky American Business Spanish.
WORLD
February 23, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman has spent his first night in prison, confined to an underground cell in a maximum-security facility with fellow accused drug traffickers with names like El Hummer, officials said Sunday. The capture on Saturday of one of the world's leading drug traffickers and Mexico's most-wanted billionaire fugitive ended a manhunt of more than a decade. Reporters at the Altiplano prison in the state of Mexico, outside Mexico City, said Guzman did not apparently receive family or lawyers as visitors, although officials were present to begin reading to him some of the many charges against him. The United States has offered a $5-million bounty on him and may seek his extradition.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Joaquin Guzman, "El Chapo," the most wanted drug lord in Mexico and a multibillionaire fugitive, has been captured, a senior U.S. official said Saturday. Few details were available. But Guzman has long been considered the top prize and most elusive figure in an extensive, ongoing drug war that has left tens of thousands of Mexicans dead. Guzman led the Sinaloa cartel, the most powerful, richest and oldest of the drug-trafficking networks in Mexico. The group is responsible for the shipment of tons of cocaine and marijuana to the U.S. The senior official said Guzman was captured early Saturday in the Sinaloa city of Mazatlan and was being transported to Mexico City.
WORLD
February 19, 2014 | By Christi Parsons and Tracy Wilkinson
TOLUCA, Mexico -- President Obama acknowledged Wednesday the hand of Russian President Vladimir Putin in two of the day's most violent hot spots -- Ukraine and Syria -- but said the conflicts should not be viewed as a “Cold War chessboard.” Speaking in a brief news conference at the conclusion of a daylong summit of North America's three leaders, Obama said that although Russia supported the Ukrainian and Syrian governments, the populations had...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan
Mayor Eric Garcetti is planning to travel next month to Mexico City on the first of what he says will be many international trade missions to promote Los Angeles . Garcetti met Tuesday in his City Hall office with a delegation of Mexico City officials to lay groundwork for his four-day visit, scheduled to start March 2. Traveling with Garcetti will be top managers of the city's harbor and airport departments, along...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2012 | By Reed Johnson
Looks like Mexican rocker Ely Guerra is changing her image again. In the process, she may help buff up the image of one of the world's most misunderstood capitals: Mexico City. According to the Mexico City newspaper El Universal , the musician -- a female pioneer of Spanish-language alternative rock -- has been recruited this season to be a spokesperson and frontwoman for the Campaña de Verano (Summer Campaign) by the secretary of tourism for the Distrito Federal, or Mexican Federal District (Mexico City)
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- Same-sex marriage is legal in this city. Gay and lesbian couples can adopt children, and the government touts tolerance and respect for "sexual diversity" in messages posted on subway platforms and bus billboards. Yet, according to Jonathan Zamora, a 31-year-old psychologist, the advancement of gay rights in Mexico's capital in recent years conceals an ugly, persistent problem: unchecked discrimination and violence in what is, on paper at least, one of the most gay-friendly cities in the world.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Kathleen Hennessey
MEXICO CITY - Twenty years after their countries signed a landmark regional trade agreement, the presidents of the United States, Mexico and Canada will meet this week to attempt to strengthen the economic ties envisioned in that pact, correct the omissions and find ways to expand. Trade and commerce are expected to dominate the agenda when President Obama meets with his Mexican and Canadian counterparts - President Enrique Peña Nieto and Prime Minister Stephen Harper - in the Mexican city of Toluca, just west of Mexico City, on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Times staff and wire services
Mexican author, journalist and essayist Federico Campbell, 72, died Saturday in a Mexico City hospital, according to a statement from the National Institute of Fine Arts. No cause was disclosed but, citing an interview with the author's son Federico Campbell Pena, the Mexico City newspaper Excelsior said he suffered a stroke after being hospitalized with the H1N1 flu virus. Campbell was best known for his short story collection "Tijuanenses," which was published by the University of California Press in 1995 as "Tijuana: Stories on the Border.
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