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Mexico Communications

BUSINESS
August 29, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Hughes Electronics Corp., General Electric Co. and Loral Corp. plan to bid next month for 60% of Mexico's Satelites Mexicanos system. Units of the three companies have qualified to bid for Satelites Mexicanos, whose three satellites cover most of North America and also Central America and part of South America, Mexico's Communications and Transportation Ministry said. Industrias Penoles, a Mexican silver-mining company that wants to diversify its operations, is also a bidder, the ministry said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001
After four years of costly and fruitless litigation, a landmark agreement between Mexico's former state-owned telephone monopoly and two U.S.-backed competitors should finally open that country's $12-billion telecommunications market to both domestic and international competition. Once the dust settles, families and businesses on both sides of the border should feel the benefit. The deal also sends a larger message of reassurance to foreign investors.
NEWS
May 7, 1993 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy over the alleged solicitation of a $1 million bribe for a Mexican government contract now has moved into the British courts, where a former IBM representative and a former Cabinet minister accuse each other of slander. The case has proven highly embarrassing for the Mexican government, which has worked hard to eliminate even the appearance of official corruption in recent years.
NEWS
June 17, 1985 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The stormy skies of central Florida gave up without a fight today, allowing the space shuttle Discovery to blast off on a mission that could lead to better communications for some of the world's more impoverished areas. "We're trucking along," the crew told Mission Control in Houston 90 minutes after the Discovery reached its orbit 220 miles above the earth.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. asked the World Trade Organization to force Mexico to open its telecommunications industry to foreign competition or face trade sanctions, raising the stakes in a two-year dispute over the $12-billion market. "Mexico's market remains dominated by a single company with a government mandate to set high wholesale prices," U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick said. The complaint to the WTO, a Geneva-based body that sets the rules for trade, boosts Avantel, part-owned by WorldCom Inc.
NEWS
September 25, 1985 | EDWARD J. BOYER, Times Staff Writer
With long-distance telephone service to Mexico City knocked out by last week's earthquake, officials at the Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles were unable to offer any relief to the hundreds of callers anxiously seeking word about their relatives in the devastated capital. "It was a very pathetic situation," said Federico Chavez, a member of the consulate's task force on communications.
NEWS
April 18, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A former Mexican prosecutor who was the chief federal law enforcement authority in Tijuana when presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio was assassinated there was gunned down Wednesday during a morning jog around a track in the Mexican border city.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
Federal regulators have taken the boldest step yet to pry open Mexico's fixed-line telephone market to competition and loosen the grip of telecom giant Telmex, which has long enjoyed a near monopoly here. An official with Mexico's Communications and Transportation Secretariat said Tuesday that the agency would craft regulations that would allow cable television companies to jump into the $12-billion market, perhaps as soon as December.
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