Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMexico Culture
IN THE NEWS

Mexico Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 28, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along one edge of the square negotiating table sat ski-masked Maya Indians, half of them in ceremonial regalia of woolen tunics and beribboned straw hats. Facing them across the room were highly trained Mexican technocrats, among them Marco Antonio Bernal, a veteran of government social programs, and prominent diplomat Gustavo Iruegas, experienced in finding common ground for different views.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Get a dose of culture during the day and dance all night at Santuario, a new entertainment center in Mexico 's Nuevo Vallarta, a resort community about 15 minutes outside Puerto Vallarta. "We view Santuario as a gateway into education and entertainment for all of our guests," said El Kadri, director of entertainment for Grupo Vidanta, a hotel and resort developer.  “We also view it as a gateway into the Nuevo Vallarta resort property.” Nuevo Vallarta , a planned residential-resort community that was organized by the Mexican government more than a decade ago, offers resort amenities on three miles of white sandy beach.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1991
A newly established institute will promote Mexican cultural and educational activities in Los Angeles and work toward improving ties between Mexico and the large Latino community in the Southland. The institute's board, headed by Los Angeles businessman Fernando Oaxaca, includes both prominent Mexican-Americans and Mexican government officials. The Mexican government is providing about $200,000 in initial funding.
WORLD
April 3, 2012 | By Daniel Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
Javier Guzman, a 25-year-old industrial engineer, eased his SUV toward the curb on a recent Sunday as a masked state police officer in the middle of the road signaled him to pull over. Guzman rolled down his window, greeting the officer with a " buenas tardes . " "Do you live here? Where are you coming from?" the officer asked. "I live here, this car is mine," Guzman replied. He had nothing to hide, yet began coughing nervously. The officer, dressed in black, from combat boots to ski mask, circled the vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1993 | ALICIA DI RADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a nod to the growing number of immigrants settling in Santa Ana, officials of the Mexican government are planning to create a cultural gathering place for the thousands of Mexicans who have made Orange County their new home. La Casa de la Cultura de Mexico, or the House of Mexican Culture, would be the county's first center sanctioned by the Mexican government for arts, education and community service.
NEWS
March 31, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The market in this town on southern Mexico's steamy Isthmus of Tehuantepec is memorable for iguana stewed in tomato sauce, sun-dried fish and a full aisle of earrings, necklaces and bracelets dripping with gold coins, a selection to rival any jewelry store.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
Hermenegildo Bustos (1832-1907) is the most important Mexican painter of the 19th Century. If you've never heard of him--well, don't be surprised. A year ago, few in the United States had. Bustos' reputation has been rather like the proverbial stone dropped into a pond. At its center, the splash was dramatic, while its ripples have been slowly expanding in larger and larger circles. Finally they've reached our shores.
NEWS
July 12, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and JOSEPH TREVINO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a sweltering evening, the flower of Yucatan womanhood is packed into a local gymnasium, dressed in Sunday-best linen and sensible pantsuits. Schoolteachers. Fresh-scrubbed college students. Moms like Maria Esther Ortega, 45, a staunch Catholic with four children. It is a historic moment for Merida, and they know it. "Yes, we did it!" thunder the 2,041 women. "Yes, we did it!" Moments later, the long-anticipated show begins. Weeks of controversy over morality and women's rights fade away.
NEWS
November 29, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back before the ubiquitous suburban shopping center was a twinkle in some developer's eye, before one-day sales and mall Muzak, historic Olvera Street was tempting the pocketbooks of area shoppers. But nowadays, the 61-year-old Mexican-flavored marketplace is perhaps better known for its cultural significance--it's part of the historic El Pueblo de Los Angeles park that marks where Los Angeles was founded in 1781. Olvera Street is indeed a marketplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1987 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Five years ago on his first trip from Mexico to visit former members of his flock in Los Angeles, Father Raul Navarro was disappointed that there was no music to greet him. Navarro, 72, a music lover and legendary figure in the lakeside town of Chapala, near Guadalajara, founded that community's reknowned children's banda de pueblo , or town band, an institution there since 1946.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could accelerate the decline of a 500-year-old tradition in Mexico, lawmakers in this capital city have voted to ban those younger than 18 from attending bullfights here. The ban could take effect at the Plaza Mexico bullring as early as next month unless Mexico City Mayor Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador forces the Metropolitan Assembly to reconsider. The ban was one of 70 articles in a bill on animal protection that was passed 55 to 0 by the assembly late Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2001 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a corner of his Garden Grove garage, Lino Espino is pecking at his gray electric typewriter, the Brother SX 14 he bought for $15 at the swap meet on Golden West Street. He's typing his latest corrido, a story told in waltz-time song and used by Mexicans for centuries to chronicle current events with pathos and satire. Today, Espino is crafting a song about the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2001 | AGUSTIN GURZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this new millennium, the market for mariachi music poses a paradox. On the one hand, the lively and tradition-rich genre will draw thousands of fans this weekend to the Hollywood Bowl for the Mariachi USA Festival, the annual showcase of Mexico's exquisite cultural export. But across town at a large Latin music retailer on Whittier Boulevard in East L.A., the current best-selling mariachi CD has nothing to do with tradition. In fact, the recording barely has anything to do with Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Virginia Diediker celebrating Mexican heritage is a year-round passion sparked 30 years ago during college. But on Cinco de Mayo, Diediker, who directs a group of Mexican folk dancers, would rather watch from the sidelines. "We just fill in the rest of the months," said Diediker, explaining that she and others in her world-touring company prefer to see community groups, which practice all year for the event, spend the day in the spotlight.
NEWS
April 11, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Mexican comedian Cantinflas shunned the film companies of his homeland and signed with Columbia Pictures in 1946, he changed the course of Latin American cinema and lifted himself to international fame. He starred with Frank Sinatra and Debbie Reynolds, won two Golden Globe Awards, including one for his role in the 1956 best picture, "Around the World in 80 Days," all based on a simple character whose roundabout phrases and meaningless speeches confounded the wealthy and powerful.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guillermo Sheridan had a bitter smile as he scrolled down the list of acquisitions by Princeton University: The papers of Carlos Fuentes, Miguel Angel Asturias, Julio Cortazar, Elena Garro--even a lesser known Mexican poet named Bernardo Ortiz de Montellano. "We Mexicans always sell our raw materials," he remarked acidly, stopping at Ortiz's name on his computer screen. "Coffee, copper--and this."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1997 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The holiday is the Mexican Dia de los Muertos--Day of the Dead--but the observance has a definite L.A. accent. In Studio City, a group of women attending a cultural workshop learns how to decorate the traditional sugar skulls that evoke the memories of the departed. Beth Sax takes a skull and carefully writes "P. Diana" for the late princess.
NEWS
January 27, 1998 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Belen Luevano de Ortega, 59, came to the border 12 years ago to support her dying husband, people told her that only women of dubious reputations worked at the maquiladora assembly plants. She settled for a miserable $3 a week as a live-in maid. But when her daughter, Alicia Ortega, 36, joined her two years later, the younger woman couldn't care less what people said. Ortega jumped at a manufacturing job--in spite of a husband who wanted her home with the children.
MAGAZINE
December 10, 2000 | CAROLYNN CARRENO, Carolynn Carreno last wrote for the magazine about a traditional Thanksgiving in Santa Barbara
About 15 years ago, taking a break from my sophomore year of college, I sat in a wood-smoky guest house in the hills of the Nepalese Himalayas talking with some Americans about "home" and what we missed. When it was my turn, I said, a little pretentiously and not a little lost in life, "I miss Mexico more than I miss the United States. There's just more to miss." I went on wistfully, as if conjuring up an actual memory.
NEWS
December 2, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newly inaugurated President Vicente Fox, decked out in a tailored gray suit and the red, white and green presidential sash, was just beginning a formal address before 10,000 supporters and dignitaries Friday when something went wrong. He stopped. He squinted at the TelePrompTer. He gave up. "I'm reading this, eh?" he confessed to the crowd. "Don't think I'm that brilliant." It was classic Vicente Fox.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|