Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMexico Government Employees
IN THE NEWS

Mexico Government Employees

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assassins gunned down a ranking state prosecutor and crushed him under the wheels of a van in front of his home in an exclusive suburb of Tijuana, authorities said Saturday. The execution-style slaying of Odin Gutierrez Rico on Friday night was the latest in a series of grisly killings that have earned Tijuana comparisons to Al Capone's Chicago. Seven senior federal law enforcement officers from Baja California have been slain during the past year. U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
The Mexican government has fired two immigration officials for deporting seven fellow citizens who could not produce official citizenship documents. The officials apparently thought the seven were from Guatemala. The fired officials could also face criminal charges, Mexico's Migration Institute said. The two officials worked at a migration office in the border state of Sonora, across from Arizona.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The latest wave of drug tests for police officers in a southern state turned up 119 agents who tested positive for drugs--4.1% of those tested. All 119 officers will be fired immediately, Miguel Mario Angulo Flota, secretary of the Quintana Roo state public security system, told the government's Notimex news agency. The tests were given to 2,879 officers in Quintana Roo state. Angulo Flota said he believed that 4.1% "does not constitute an alarming proportion."
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico fired 43 mid- and high-level public employees, including 19 customs officials at airports in Mexico City and Monterrey, as part of an ongoing effort to stamp out corruption. The Economy Ministry said the workers were fired because of "a loss of confidence in their abilities." Some could face criminal charges, it said. President Vicente Fox has launched a crusade against corruption.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Mexico fired 43 mid- and high-level public employees, including 19 customs officials at airports in Mexico City and Monterrey, as part of an ongoing effort to stamp out corruption. The Economy Ministry said the workers were fired because of "a loss of confidence in their abilities." Some could face criminal charges, it said. President Vicente Fox has launched a crusade against corruption.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until a few weeks ago, Alejandro Partido would have been aghast at the idea of becoming a bureaucrat. "My perception was that you got to a government office and didn't do anything. You arrived at 9 and left at 10 [a.m.]," the recent MBA grad said with a sniff. "Total inefficiency." But this is Mexico's new era. So last week, Partido marched up to the headquarters of President-elect Vicente Fox and joined the stream of people offering their resumes. "It's the change of person," Partido, 29, said.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The new chief of Mexico's customs agency fired 45 of the department's 47 supervisors and said the ax would fall on the remaining two soon. He cited corruption, inefficiency and apathy among customs agents. Jose Guzman Montalvo promised a complete overhaul of the agency, widely accused of extorting money and collaborating with criminals entering ports and crossing checkpoints along the U.S. border.
NEWS
October 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Mexican officials said Friday that they have won the extradition of former prosecutor Pablo Chapa Bezanilla from Spain and that he will probably be returned within days. Chapa Bezanilla fled to Spain earlier this year after investigators said he allegedly paid informants to plant human remains at the house of the brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They used hypodermic syringes to spatter their blood on Mexico City's government buildings during protests. Two of them launched a hunger strike in a tent outside the National Human Rights Commission building, a protest that began Oct. 14 and now threatens to claim their lives.
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New mandatory drug tests for Mexico's federal law enforcement agencies turned up 424 police, prosecutors and administrative personnel who tested positive--nearly half of them for cocaine use--during the past six weeks, the attorney general's office disclosed here Tuesday.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The new chief of Mexico's customs agency fired 45 of the department's 47 supervisors and said the ax would fall on the remaining two soon. He cited corruption, inefficiency and apathy among customs agents. Jose Guzman Montalvo promised a complete overhaul of the agency, widely accused of extorting money and collaborating with criminals entering ports and crossing checkpoints along the U.S. border.
NEWS
August 8, 2000 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until a few weeks ago, Alejandro Partido would have been aghast at the idea of becoming a bureaucrat. "My perception was that you got to a government office and didn't do anything. You arrived at 9 and left at 10 [a.m.]," the recent MBA grad said with a sniff. "Total inefficiency." But this is Mexico's new era. So last week, Partido marched up to the headquarters of President-elect Vicente Fox and joined the stream of people offering their resumes. "It's the change of person," Partido, 29, said.
NEWS
May 2, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican drug prosecutor Jose Patino Moreno enjoyed the respect of U.S. authorities along the international border even before accepting the daunting assignment that would be his last. Courtly and careful, Patino, a ranking lawyer in the narcotics unit of the federal attorney general's office in Mexico City, had impressed U.S. counterparts as a trustworthy ally and a bright spot in his country's often-fitful campaign against drug smuggling.
NEWS
October 4, 1997 | From Associated Press
Mexican officials said Friday that they have won the extradition of former prosecutor Pablo Chapa Bezanilla from Spain and that he will probably be returned within days. Chapa Bezanilla fled to Spain earlier this year after investigators said he allegedly paid informants to plant human remains at the house of the brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.
NEWS
August 28, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The latest wave of drug tests for police officers in a southern state turned up 119 agents who tested positive for drugs--4.1% of those tested. All 119 officers will be fired immediately, Miguel Mario Angulo Flota, secretary of the Quintana Roo state public security system, told the government's Notimex news agency. The tests were given to 2,879 officers in Quintana Roo state. Angulo Flota said he believed that 4.1% "does not constitute an alarming proportion."
NEWS
March 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New mandatory drug tests for Mexico's federal law enforcement agencies turned up 424 police, prosecutors and administrative personnel who tested positive--nearly half of them for cocaine use--during the past six weeks, the attorney general's office disclosed here Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1988 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Agents from Mexico's top national security agency guarded marijuana shipments and delivered hundreds of assault rifles to the narcotics traffickers believed responsible for the murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena, a high-ranking U.S. official testified Tuesday.
NEWS
August 20, 1996 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexicans grappled with a baffling new set of questions Monday about their nation's political volatility after this weekend's gangland slaying of yet another federal prosecutor who had played a role in investigating the assassination of the nation's onetime presidential heir apparent.
NEWS
January 11, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They used hypodermic syringes to spatter their blood on Mexico City's government buildings during protests. Two of them launched a hunger strike in a tent outside the National Human Rights Commission building, a protest that began Oct. 14 and now threatens to claim their lives.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assassins gunned down a ranking state prosecutor and crushed him under the wheels of a van in front of his home in an exclusive suburb of Tijuana, authorities said Saturday. The execution-style slaying of Odin Gutierrez Rico on Friday night was the latest in a series of grisly killings that have earned Tijuana comparisons to Al Capone's Chicago. Seven senior federal law enforcement officers from Baja California have been slain during the past year. U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|