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NEWS
September 22, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Mexico, it is often said that the past is never past, that Mexican history is as alive as the Mexican present. This is, after all, a country that continues to grapple with its 16th-Century conquest, a country where government officials sign public documents with the 1910 revolutionary slogan, "Effective suffrage; no reelection." And where schoolbooks, free to students for more than 30 years, are still hailed as "free texts."
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NATIONAL
May 30, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos
The Whitewater-Baldy Complex fire in New Mexico hasn't just broken the record for the largest blaze in state history, it's shattered it. An infrared reading about midnight Tuesday measured the fire at 170,272 acres, leaving last year's 156,593-acre Las Conchas fire in the dust. That acreage roughly translates to 269 square miles, more than half the size of city of Los Angeles. “The fire seems to be growing in all directions,” fire information officer Gerry Perry told the Los Angeles Times.
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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The remains of a huge, ancient port city believed to have flourished for 500 years during the decline of the Roman Empire have been discovered on Mexico's Gulf Coast, the National Geographic Society announced Thursday. With more than 150 earthen pyramids and other buildings, the biggest 100 feet high, the port seems to have been North America's largest coastal city 1,500 years ago. The site, in the state of Veracruz, has been named El Pital for a nearby town.
WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
There's an extra reason Father Miguel Hidalgo is considered the Father of the Nation. The priest fathered numerous children with a string of "wives" he canoodled with even as he fought for the independence of Mexico. The peccadilloes of Hidalgo and others in Mexico's pantheon of national heroes are getting a fresh hearing these days as the country marks the 200th anniversary of its independence and the 100th anniversary of its revolution. Dozens of new movies, books and television programs have popped up, reexamining the history of Mexico's struggles for liberation and the men — and, yes, the women — who waged them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1999
Mexico is a land of rich history and wonderful contrasts. It was home to sophisticated ancient cultures, yet was forced to struggle many years for its independence--in fact, today's Cinco de Mayo celebration commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla victory over the French. Much of Mexico is a vast inland plateau, but it also is known for such wondrous ocean creatures as the gray whale and sea turtle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998
While the United States was fighting the Civil War, citizens of the newly established Mexican government were battling the heavily armed forces of the French. Against all odds, Mexico won this battle on May 5, 1862. Though more battles needed to be won before Mexico was truly free, today both Mexicans and Americans remember this important victory by celebrating Cinco de Mayo. To find out more, use the direct links on The Times Launchpoint Web site: http://www.latimes.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | Reed Johnson, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Eden and Atlantis rolled into one. A Shangri-La where old age and death supposedly were unknown. A paradise that, inscribed in ancient tribal memory, has passed from legend into tradition into myth. Nearly every world culture has its epic of origin, a story that explains where its people came from and defines who they are. The Israelites had their Exodus, the Romans their "Aeneid," the Germans their Nibelungenlied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1994 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
First-grader Hector Gamiz didn't know the meaning of the intricate designs decorating his T-shirt until he met Montezuma, the last Aztec emperor of Mexico, on Wednesday at Forest Lawn-Memorial Park, Hollywood Hills. Montezuma, played by actor Fabian Gregory Cordova, described the foods ancient Mexicans ate, the gods they worshiped and the monuments they built as he led about 25 Southland school children on a tour of the outdoor Plaza of Mexican Heritage at the cemetery.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | YVETTE C. DOSS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A small boy, a young cadet in the Mexican army, is said to have wrapped himself in the Mexican flag as he leaped to his death from the top of Chapultepec Castle in Mexico City during the last stand of the U.S.-Mexican war in 1847. He, along with five other young "nin~os heroes"--or "child heroes," as they are now known in Mexico--flung themselves off the castle during the battle, joining the tens of thousands of Mexican soldiers who died fighting U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The rebellious black stallion had finally let Jimmy Smits mount him and the six child actors playing Cheech Marin's brood were primed to pay their father a tearful goodby when the first raindrops fell. A clap of thunder sent the cast and crew of Turner Network Television's made-for-TV movie "The Cisco Kid" running for the cover of an adobe house in this mountain village, their sixth location in as many weeks.
TRAVEL
August 17, 2008 | By Christopher Reynolds, Times staff writer
"The most interesting part about [El Morro] is the signatures of all the people going through there," reader Laura LaCour-Johnson, a native of Albuquerque, write in her nominating letter. "The best time to go is just before winter, when it's chilly but you can still go up. If it has just snowed, it's really, really nice. " THE SETTING El Morro National Monument , a much-carved bluff in the high desert of western New Mexico. THE VIBE Anasazi, with one layer of Spanish colonialism and another of American Manifest Destiny, all seen through the lens of National Park Service stewardship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2008 | John L. Mitchell, Times Staff Writer
In Mexico, the story of the country's black population has been largely ignored in favor of an ideology that declares that all Mexicans are "mixed race." But it's the mixture of indigenous and European heritage that most Mexicans embrace; the African legacy is overlooked.
NEWS
December 28, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mexico's secretive counterinsurgency squad came looking for her in this industrial city two hours' drive from the U.S. border, Violeta Tecla Parra was already hardened by detention and savvy to their ways. So, as she opened her apartment door that day in April 1978, Violeta pulled out a pistol and opened fire, striking one agent in his flak jacket before she was bearhugged to the ground. And that, as far as the official record goes, was the last anyone heard of her.
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were joined together in a clandestine ceremony, a blessing from a Catholic priest. It was a substitute for the wedding that had to be canceled because both bride and groom were wanted by the police. Once devotees of the teachings of Jesus, Ignacio Salas Obregon and Graciela Mijares had just become urban warriors, self-styled guerrilla fighters who robbed banks and planned kidnappings from "safe houses" scattered across this capital city.
NEWS
November 28, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fulfilling a key campaign pledge, Mexican President Vicente Fox said Tuesday that his government will prosecute and punish officials who are found responsible for killing hundreds of leftists in the 1970s and '80s. Speaking in the courtyard of a former jail once filled with political prisoners, Fox also said that security files from that era will be opened, allowing public scrutiny for the first time of human rights abuses during the government's "dirty war" against leftist insurgents.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | Reed Johnson, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Eden and Atlantis rolled into one. A Shangri-La where old age and death supposedly were unknown. A paradise that, inscribed in ancient tribal memory, has passed from legend into tradition into myth. Nearly every world culture has its epic of origin, a story that explains where its people came from and defines who they are. The Israelites had their Exodus, the Romans their "Aeneid," the Germans their Nibelungenlied.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the father of your country were best known for cutting down an Aztec emperor rather than a cherry tree, would you honor him with a monument? While American textbooks illuminate the most honorable qualities of George Washington, official Mexican lore has vilified the father of modern Mexico, Spanish conqueror Hernando Cortes. To many Mexicans, Cortes is a symbol of rape and plunder. He tore down Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec Empire, and imposed Spanish rule over Indian civilization.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
At mid morning the wind hadn't begun to play havoc on this remote, barren film location, 57 miles northeast of Mexico City. Yet daily, around noon, the hot breeze that abruptly sweeps over the landscape and creates clouds of dust is so strong that at times it threatens to halt the film making going on here. Thirty miles away, in the shadow of the ancient Aztec pyramids at Teotihuacan, Jane Fonda was on her way to the set of "Old Gringo."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2000 | CHRISTINE McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Archeologist Jeffrey Wilkerson had long suspected that massive floods flashed through Mexico's Gulf Coast lowlands every few hundred years, overwhelming ancient pre-Columbian cities and their sophisticated flood control systems. But not until he was nearly swept away in last October's Tropical Depression No. 11 did Wilkerson get to glimpse the destructive force of these storms.
NEWS
July 3, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH and MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With their thunderous rejection of the Institutional Revolutionary Party on Sunday, the Mexican people ravaged not only a political party but a way of life. Opposition challenger Vicente Fox's presidential victory over Francisco Labastida ended 71 years of unbroken rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, by far the longest of any governing faction in the world. But the PRI was far more than just a government.
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