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Mexico History

NEWS
February 4, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN and ROBERT RANDOLPH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the first time in modern Mexican history, a former president testified Tuesday before a congressional committee, as legislators plunged into an investigation of one of this country's most painful events: the army massacre of student protesters in 1968. Former President Luis Echeverria, 76, was asked to clarify the mystery still surrounding the military attack--an assault so bloody it started the gradual decline of Mexico's one-party state.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Two landmark exhibitions from this year combined to give a satellite's-eye view of human history evolving. They concern the time when the voyages of Christopher Columbus set in motion a turmoil of epochal change. They arrive in the troubled twilight of a millennial century when the peoples of the planet are again in anxious motion. They speak to the present.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1996 | DEBRA CANO
The recent restoration of a community mural depicting Mexican and Chicano history will be celebrated Saturday at the Salvation Army Anaheim Temple Corps. Damaged by graffiti several months ago, the 6-foot-tall, 106-foot-wide "Nuestra Experiencia en el Siglo Viente" (Our Experience in the 20th Century) mural on an a wall adjacent to the Salvation Army's parking lot was restored by local artist Emigdio Vasquez.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a captured warrior in the Aztec Empire, the most honorable way to die was fighting. Tied to a giant stone, the prisoner would do battle against four gladiators at once. In death, he--or she--was decapitated, a sacrifice to the gods. This, anthropologists say, may have been the fate of the Indian soul whose skull was unearthed in downtown Mexico City last month five feet beneath a colonial mansion that was undergoing restoration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1989 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Moctezuma, the last Aztec emperor of Mexico, was trying to make a point about Mexican history to about 150 elementary school youngsters Friday. He asked them, "What day is it tomorrow?" "Saturday," a bright-eyed little girl piped up. Several youngsters sitting around the blonde respondent whispered, "No it isn't." They knew what the old Aztec was driving at. "It's Mexican Independence Day," they said.
TRAVEL
April 30, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
The Mexican hacienda, conceived in the 16th century and condemned in the early 20th, is making a comeback. But this time, instead of crops to reap or minerals to mine, it has rooms to rent. In one such room last month, I dozed off to the sound of crickets and frogs, and woke on a massive bed beneath a slowly circling fan under a 25-foot-high ceiling of rough beams, within four very old, very thick walls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hoisting posters, waving banners and shouting "La lucha sigue"--the struggle continues--more than 150 people paraded downtown Sunday to commemorate the life of Mexican revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata. "Zapata, listen to us, your people continue to fight!" blared in Spanish from loudspeakers during the march. Mexican Americans and other Latinos today are facing the same problems Zapata fought against decades ago, said Jaime Cruz, one of the event's coordinators.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | SANDY SHORE
A delicate picture map painted on deerskin is one of the rare treasures exploring the mysteries of the ancient Aztecs in a Denver Museum of Natural History exhibition. The faded map on show in "Aztec: The World of Moctezuma" is known as a lienzo. It was probably produced by an Aztec scribe in the years after the conquest of the 20-million-strong empire in the Valley of Mexico by Spanish explorers in 1521.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | ERNEST SANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A stroll around this dusty but colorful city of 15,000 can be culturally confusing. First, there's the church designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (of Eiffel Tower fame). Then there's the bakery specializing in baguettes. And, finally, there are the sweeping porches and balconies of French colonial architecture. The French occupied Mexico in the 1860s and left their mark in places throughout the country. Eiffel even designed buildings in other parts of Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Montezuma is telling the story of the Spanish conqueror Cortes' slaughter of the Aztec people of Mexico. It is brutal: "They cut off their heads, their arms, their legs," says Montezuma. It is tragic: "Aztec warriors were being killed by the thousands. They fought bravely, but on Aug. 13, 1521, the Aztecs surrendered to the Spaniards." The gathered schoolchildren are rapt. Montezuma wears a headdress of red, black and yellow feathers. "When you leave here today, go in peace," he concludes.
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