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TRAVEL
April 30, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
The Mexican hacienda, conceived in the 16th century and condemned in the early 20th, is making a comeback. But this time, instead of crops to reap or minerals to mine, it has rooms to rent. In one such room last month, I dozed off to the sound of crickets and frogs, and woke on a massive bed beneath a slowly circling fan under a 25-foot-high ceiling of rough beams, within four very old, very thick walls.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hoisting posters, waving banners and shouting "La lucha sigue"--the struggle continues--more than 150 people paraded downtown Sunday to commemorate the life of Mexican revolutionary hero Emiliano Zapata. "Zapata, listen to us, your people continue to fight!" blared in Spanish from loudspeakers during the march. Mexican Americans and other Latinos today are facing the same problems Zapata fought against decades ago, said Jaime Cruz, one of the event's coordinators.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | SANDY SHORE
A delicate picture map painted on deerskin is one of the rare treasures exploring the mysteries of the ancient Aztecs in a Denver Museum of Natural History exhibition. The faded map on show in "Aztec: The World of Moctezuma" is known as a lienzo. It was probably produced by an Aztec scribe in the years after the conquest of the 20-million-strong empire in the Valley of Mexico by Spanish explorers in 1521.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1995 | ERNEST SANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A stroll around this dusty but colorful city of 15,000 can be culturally confusing. First, there's the church designed by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel (of Eiffel Tower fame). Then there's the bakery specializing in baguettes. And, finally, there are the sweeping porches and balconies of French colonial architecture. The French occupied Mexico in the 1860s and left their mark in places throughout the country. Eiffel even designed buildings in other parts of Latin America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Montezuma is telling the story of the Spanish conqueror Cortes' slaughter of the Aztec people of Mexico. It is brutal: "They cut off their heads, their arms, their legs," says Montezuma. It is tragic: "Aztec warriors were being killed by the thousands. They fought bravely, but on Aug. 13, 1521, the Aztecs surrendered to the Spaniards." The gathered schoolchildren are rapt. Montezuma wears a headdress of red, black and yellow feathers. "When you leave here today, go in peace," he concludes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | GREG HERNANDEZ
This weekend, thousands of Orange County residents will gather in parks, restaurants and back yards to celebrate Cinco de Mayo, the Mexican holiday most familiar to Americans. But local Latino leaders say that the occasion has a different flavor in the United States than in Mexico, where Cinco de Mayo is a minor event compared to Mexican Independence Day on Sept. 16. And they worry that the historical meaning of the occasion is sometimes lost amid margarita specials and mariachi music.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | SANDY SHORE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Before Batman, there was Bat God. While the modern caped crusader is famous for his crime-fighting adventures, no one is really sure why Bat God mesmerized the ancient Aztecs of Mesoamerica. "The significance of the bat god is still under study," said University of Colorado Prof. David Carrasco. "What we do know is that bats and bat symbolism tended to be associated with caves, the underworld and the afterlife."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1995
On a day honoring men like Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata, Mexican Americans made room for a woman in their pantheon of heroes in Lincoln Park on Monday, unveiling the first monument to a heroine of the War of Independence. Shortly after the traditional Nov. 20 homage to heroes of the Mexican Civil War of 1910, dignitaries and residents stepped farther back in history, honoring Dona Josefa Ortiz de Dominguez for her role in the Mexican War of Independence a century earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1997 | KARIMA A. HAYNES
Strains of ancient Indian music filled the air as Montezuma, the last Aztec emperor of Mexico, emerged from behind stone sculptures adorning the outdoor Plaza of Mexican Heritage at Forest Lawn-Memorial Park. Montezuma--dressed in a flowing gold lame cape, feathered headdress and beaded breastplate, loincloth and boots--strode to the edge of the plaza and introduced himself to 200 students from Valley Alternative Magnet School in Van Nuys. "I am Mexico's last great emperor! Montezuma!"
WORLD
September 13, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
There's an extra reason Father Miguel Hidalgo is considered the Father of the Nation. The priest fathered numerous children with a string of "wives" he canoodled with even as he fought for the independence of Mexico. The peccadilloes of Hidalgo and others in Mexico's pantheon of national heroes are getting a fresh hearing these days as the country marks the 200th anniversary of its independence and the 100th anniversary of its revolution. Dozens of new movies, books and television programs have popped up, reexamining the history of Mexico's struggles for liberation and the men — and, yes, the women — who waged them.
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