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Mexico Industries

BUSINESS
October 14, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Mexico's industrial output had its biggest drop in four months in August amid sluggish demand in the U.S. for cars, auto parts and other goods produced by export-assembly factories set up along the border. Industrial production -- which includes manufacturing, energy, construction and mining -- shrank 2.9% from August 2002 after contracting 1.9% in July, the government said Monday. The decline, the fifth in a row, was bigger than the 1.7% median drop forecast in a Bloomberg News analyst survey.
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BUSINESS
February 19, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING and DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lavender Ford Mustangs, sturdy Jeep Cherokees and economical Nissan Tsuru sedans waited in showrooms here last week for what car dealers hoped would be a crush of customers ahead of a government-scheduled 6% price hike. But few buyers--or even window-shopping tire kickers--showed up, and the handful who did were driving hard bargains.
BUSINESS
June 15, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexican officials vow that they will respect the constitution in considering any new foreign participation in the nation's oil industry under a proposed North American free-trade agreement. "Nothing that violates the constitution," they declare week after week when the issue arises in the press. But many Mexicans think that waving the constitution is just a bargaining chip in the ongoing free-trade negotiations.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2010 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With "The Perfect Game," first-time screenwriter W. William Winokur tells the story of Mexico's Monterrey Industrials, the first foreign baseball team to win the Little League World Series in 1957. A bunch of players a good couple sizes smaller than their opponents, the team literally walked across the border to their first game, expecting to lose and go home, but instead kept winning all the way to the championships. The pitcher would go on to throw a perfect game in the final and to this day remains the only pitcher to do so in a Little League World Series championship game.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2006 | Cecilia Sanchez and Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writers
Racked by corruption, poverty, ethnic inequality and violent drug trafficking, Mexico certainly has no shortage of subject matter for documentary films. Nor does it lack a pool of talented young documentary filmmakers. What it needs is more financial support for documentary production, and possibly a jolt of Hollywood-grade star power. That's where Gael Garcia Bernal and Diego Luna, two of Mexico's most bankable young actors, think they can help.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - President Obama will seek to cement relations with Mexico's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto, over the next two days with vows of neighborly kinship and future cooperation. But the true test of their ability to work together may be whether they can hold their tongues. Obama's visit to Mexico City comes as the fight over border security and immigration reform has begun to consume Congress. Peña Nieto supports the effort but wants to avoid the mistakes of a predecessor, Vicente Fox, who lobbied for a 2001 immigration reform bill in Congress.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1992
The media drumbeat over a free trade agreement between the United States and Mexico has reached deafening proportions. Under this agreement, goods produced in either country would be allowed to enter the other duty-free. Capital investment would be allowed to enter either country without penalty. The hype ignores the fact that the United States reached its peak in industrial production under tariff protection. Japan and Korea are prospering under government protection of their markets from invasion by outsiders.
OPINION
November 14, 1993 | Walter Russell Mead, Walter Russell Mead, a contributing editor to Opinion, is the author of "Mortal Splendor: The American Empire in Transition" (Houghton Mifflin). He is now working on a book about U.S. foreign policy for the Twentieth Century Fund
The North American Free Trade Agreement will encourage foreign investment in Mexico and create jobs there. Because Mexicans will have jobs at home, they won't come north looking for work. NAFTA, there fore, will reduce immigration from Mexico to the United States. Right? Wrong. NAFTA could mean millions of additional immigrants over the next 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1989 | FRANK del OLMO, Frank del Olmo is a Times editorial writer
Much is being made of the fact that Mexico's powerful ruling party has lost a major election for the first time. It could mean a monolithic political system is becoming more democratic, and anyone interested in the stability and progress of Mexico should hope that's the case. But just as interesting is where that defeat occurred--our neighboring state of Baja California.
NEWS
December 29, 1994 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a week of trauma, tension and fear, Mexico appeared on the path toward peace Wednesday, after Indian rebels agreed to negotiate through an official Roman Catholic mediator and President Ernesto Zedillo ordered the army to withdraw from two key towns in the southern state of Chiapas.
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