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Mexico Politics

NEWS
December 15, 1996 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexico's longtime ruling party, desperately seeking strong leadership to face crucial elections next year, prepared Saturday to choose a new president. The party, which has been buffeted by election losses and infighting, is expected to choose the president of the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Congress, in a meeting today.
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NEWS
September 1, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the next three days, the party that has ruled Mexico for 61 years will attempt to re-invent itself, at least enough to present a new face to voters in next year's congressional elections. The 8,500 delegates to the 14th National Convention of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI from its initials in Spanish, are charged with restoring the party's slipping fortunes.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a crisp Saturday morning, hundreds of supporters of Francisco Labastida jammed a pavilion here, shaking green pompoms, jangling cowbells and cheering for the man widely seen as the leading presidential candidate for the world's longest-ruling party. The rally appeared to reflect an outpouring of emotion as Mexico faces a milestone in its young democracy: the first presidential primary of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. But a closer look at the crowd showed something different.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo inaugurated a new, more democratic era in Mexican politics Monday with a passionate appeal to ascendant opposition parties not to derail the country's free-market economic revolution. "For the first time in our history, we can achieve healthy, durable economic growth, along with a full, pluralistic and harmonious democracy," the president declared in his State of the Union address. "This is the opportunity of our generation."
NEWS
June 13, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that startled Mexicans, disgraced former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari returned briefly to his homeland Saturday after four years in self-exile but sought to dampen speculation that he will play a role in next year's presidential election. Salinas, who won international acclaim for opening Mexico's economy but was vilified after he left office in 1994, told reporters that he was on a 24-hour "private visit." It was motivated mainly by a desire to see his ailing father, he said.
NEWS
September 3, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vicente Fox, the tough cop of this nation's right, is back. Within days of the federal elections in which his National Action Party (PAN) lost nine of its 39 seats in the Chamber of Deputies, along with making a disappointing showing in the presidential race, Fox announced he was ending his retirement from politics.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguably the most powerful man in Mexico after President Carlos Salinas de Gortari is a slight, bespectacled economist with a French accent and a deliberately low profile. Jose Cordoba Montoya is the president's closest adviser. The press and political pundits alternately refer to him as "a virtual vice president," "a prime minister" and "a combined secretary of state and presidential chief of staff." Or, the Henry A. Kissinger of Mexico.
BUSINESS
January 30, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the price of oil surging to unheard-of levels in this petroleum-rich nation, the president was bursting with confidence: "We must prepare ourselves," he declared, for "the historic opportunity to administer abundance." The date was Jan. 7, 1978, crude oil was racing toward an astronomical price of $38.50 a barrel, and Mexico was in a frenzy spending the billions of oil dollars pouring into government coffers.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even the august Fidel Velazquez, dean of the Mexican labor movement, venerable pillar of the long-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party, says it's time. After more than six decades of national preeminence, Velazquez cautions, his beloved party must belatedly begin choosing its presidential candidates in a more democratic fashion--perhaps even adopting U.S.-style political conventions.
NEWS
August 30, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The formation last week of a breakaway coalition of Mexican unions signals the profound changes here assailing organized labor, which up to now has been a monolithic but docile pillar of the nation's ruling party.
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