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NEWS
February 2, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political jockeying these days to restart peace negotiations in the southern state of Chiapas sometimes descends to absurd levels. To wit: Will rebel leader Subcommander Marcos take off his ski mask when he emerges from the jungle and testifies before Congress here next month? And if he doesn't, will legislators walk out on him? Yet behind such maneuvering lie divisive issues that could derail one of the key initiatives of Mexican President Vicente Fox's 2-month-old administration.
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NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Mexican army abandoned another jungle base in the southern state of Chiapas, as the government moved closer to meeting the demands of leftist Zapatista rebels. President Vicente Fox has now shuttered four of the seven Chiapas bases whose closure the rebels have demanded. The rebels accuse the army of abusing Indians and supporting paramilitary gangs. They also demand passage of an Indian rights law and the release of about 100 imprisoned rebels as a condition for restarting peace talks.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of followers of Yucatan state's ruling party prevented a federally appointed electoral council from taking office Monday, setting up a potentially explosive confrontation between a state and the federal government.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The southern heartland of Mexico's once-mighty Institutional Revolutionary Party is abuzz with political rebellion reminiscent of the 1963 battle over states' rights in Alabama, where Gov. George Wallace defied federal orders to integrate the schools. Here in Yucatan state, the legislature--still controlled by the PRI, as the party is known--is refusing to obey a federal order to swear in a new state electoral council that in May will run an important gubernatorial election.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Mexico's Congress cleared the way Wednesday for a member of the country's former ruling party to take over as provisional governor in the oil-rich state of Tabasco. The federal Congress authorized a leave of absence for Enrique Priego of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, who last month was named interim governor of Tabasco, throwing the state into upheaval.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The languid southern Mexican state of Tabasco on Wednesday either had no governor at all or two of them--or maybe just one, depending on whom you asked. The oil-rich state on the Gulf of Mexico, long a loyal fiefdom of the party that dominated 20th century Mexico, lost its governor-elect Friday when the Federal Electoral Tribunal annulled the Oct. 15 election on grounds of irregularities favoring the state's ruling party. It was the first time a major Mexican election has been overturned.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Legislators in Mexico's Tabasco state found themselves with two interim governors--and no agreement about which one should stay. Opposition lawmakers appointed a second interim governor after rejecting the candidate appointed Sunday by the outgoing legislature dominated by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. The PRI candidate, interim Gov. Enrique Priego, was also sworn in Sunday.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
The first session of Tabasco's new state legislature exploded into fistfights Monday as lawmakers fought over an interim governor named after October's gubernatorial election was annulled. Chairs and windows were broken during the brawl in which opposition legislators from the leftist Democratic Revolution Party, or PRD, angrily rejected the candidate chosen Sunday by the outgoing legislature, dominated by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI.
NEWS
January 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
In one of its final acts, the outgoing congress in Tabasco state named a former ruling party legislator as acting governor Sunday, two days after a top court stripped the party of its recently won governorship. The naming of Enrique Priego, 53, came amid protests from opposition parties, which won a major victory Friday when Mexico's top electoral court annulled the results of the gulf coast state's October elections, backing opposition claims that the balloting was marred with errors.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court ruled Friday that unfair practices had fatally marred a critical election and ordered that a new ballot be held. No, this wasn't about Florida's presidential count. It was the Oct. 15 governor's race in the southern Mexican state of Tabasco. The long-dominant Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, had claimed victory in the hard-fought election, which would have helped the party recover from its defeat in the July 2 presidential race.
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