Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMexico Politics
IN THE NEWS

Mexico Politics

NEWS
March 12, 2001 | LEE ROMNEY and JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tens of thousands of supporters welcomed Subcommander Marcos and 23 other Chiapas rebel leaders as their caravan rolled triumphantly into the Mexican capital's main square, ending a 2,100-mile trek from their southern stronghold and opening an uncertain political chapter in Mexico's modern democracy.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 10, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vicente Fox has spent his first 100 days in office generating so many initiatives, programs and operations that Mexicans could be pardoned for shrugging: another day, another crusade. With the combined zeal of his Jesuit education and his years as a Coca-Cola executive, Fox has crafted an ambitious vision for turning Mexico on its head by the end of his six-year term--if he can execute even a portion of his projects.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of the Mexican capital these days could be forgiven for humming the refrain from the old Chicago song: "Does anybody really know what time it is?" Their leftist mayor, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, has decreed that the Federal District will not adopt daylight saving time when nearly all the rest of Mexico moves the clocks forward on the first Sunday in May.
NEWS
March 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
After five heady days of cheering crowds and welcoming banners, Mexico's Zapatista rebels headed Thursday into slightly hostile territory: a state whose governor called the guerrilla leader a coward and made it clear the insurgents weren't welcome.
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years after he and his ragtag band of Maya Indians seized this placid colonial city in an armed rebellion that stunned the world, Subcommander Marcos was back, armed this time not with a gun but with a speech. In that moment this weekend, the Zapatista rebels' struggle for indigenous rights shifted from a military theater where the guerrillas had no prospect of victory to a political stage--one where they may well be capable of challenging the new national government as agents for change.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political jockeying these days to restart peace negotiations in the southern state of Chiapas sometimes descends to absurd levels. To wit: Will rebel leader Subcommander Marcos take off his ski mask when he emerges from the jungle and testifies before Congress here next month? And if he doesn't, will legislators walk out on him? Yet behind such maneuvering lie divisive issues that could derail one of the key initiatives of Mexican President Vicente Fox's 2-month-old administration.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Mexican army abandoned another jungle base in the southern state of Chiapas, as the government moved closer to meeting the demands of leftist Zapatista rebels. President Vicente Fox has now shuttered four of the seven Chiapas bases whose closure the rebels have demanded. The rebels accuse the army of abusing Indians and supporting paramilitary gangs. They also demand passage of an Indian rights law and the release of about 100 imprisoned rebels as a condition for restarting peace talks.
NEWS
January 16, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of followers of Yucatan state's ruling party prevented a federally appointed electoral council from taking office Monday, setting up a potentially explosive confrontation between a state and the federal government.
NEWS
January 14, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The southern heartland of Mexico's once-mighty Institutional Revolutionary Party is abuzz with political rebellion reminiscent of the 1963 battle over states' rights in Alabama, where Gov. George Wallace defied federal orders to integrate the schools. Here in Yucatan state, the legislature--still controlled by the PRI, as the party is known--is refusing to obey a federal order to swear in a new state electoral council that in May will run an important gubernatorial election.
NEWS
January 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Mexico's Congress cleared the way Wednesday for a member of the country's former ruling party to take over as provisional governor in the oil-rich state of Tabasco. The federal Congress authorized a leave of absence for Enrique Priego of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, who last month was named interim governor of Tabasco, throwing the state into upheaval.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|