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Mexico Revolts

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NEWS
February 19, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mexicans love a masked hero. From Zorro, the nobleman who righted wrongs in colonial California, to Superbarrio, the modern-day wrestler looking out for the rights of the city's poor, disguise enhances the legend. So it's little wonder that a sharp-witted rebel in a ski mask has become a celebrity as Sub-commander Marcos, the voice of the revolution in southern Mexico.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Carlos Reygadas admits that when he first heard the concept behind the new movie "RevoluciĆ³n" — a compilation of 10 short films by 10 different Mexican directors — he felt "a little reluctant" to join in. Omnibus movies, he knew, often add up to less than the sum of their parts. And the theme of this particular film came spring-loaded with significance: the legacy of the Mexican Revolution of 1910-1920. Furthermore, the movie's release would be timed to coincide with this year's heavily hyped centennial celebrations taking place on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border.
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NEWS
September 15, 1994 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Josefina Hernandez Gomez did not have much to go home to. On the day last year when she and her extended family were driven into exile, Hernandez's hateful neighbors burned their tiny houses and stole the chickens and sheep. The unattended radish and corn crops rotted. But Hernandez and her family, defying threats of death, did return. They sleep in the fertilizer shed while starting to rebuild. "They burned everything. Our mattresses.
NEWS
November 25, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young woman brought up as Luz Elba Gorostiola had a void in her life. Though her adoptive family raised her with great love, she learned in her teens that her birth parents were leftist guerrillas killed long ago by police in a shootout. But she never knew their names--or her own. Her adoptive parents, Alejandro and Maria Gorostiola, could only tell her that one June night in 1975, Alejandro's brother Carlos came to their door with a toddler wrapped in a sweater.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1994 | ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The violent uprising that began recently in southern Mexico is drawing special attention at the Crystal Cathedral, where volunteers and missionaries from the church are praying for the safety of workers at a hospital the church helped build 10 years ago. Church officials have heard that the eight employees of the remote clinic fled the area last week when rebels stormed several villages in the state of Chiapas to protest the government's treatment of peasants in the area.
NEWS
February 13, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tightening the government's grip on the embattled southernmost state of Chiapas, the Mexican and Guatemalan armies closed their border and Mexican troops moved to surround half a million acres of unexplored jungle Sunday in their hunt for fugitive leaders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army. Witnesses reported that guerrillas were fleeing deep into the vast Montes Azules Reserve.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two decades, Sebastian Diaz vividly recalls his father's last visit to his modest home in the hills of Chiapas, Mexico's most southern state. The elder Diaz stood in the door of the one-room, thatch-roofed adobe, with a stack of matches clearly visible behind him. "We hear you changed religions," he told his son. "It would be better if you did not wake up here tomorrow."
NEWS
February 27, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pedro Perez and his neighbor, Gustavo, spent their youth picking coffee and herding cattle for ranchers at the edge of the southern Mexican highlands and their middle age trying to carve a living from the jungle. For two decades, they have worked together--mostly in vain--to demand basic education, health care, water and access to this village, which is now a four-hour trek over muddy trails from the nearest dirt road.
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the midst of Mexico's celebrated transition to democracy, a state election was held here recently. The result: 15,000 protesters took to the streets. A campaign worker was assassinated. And guerrillas are warning of "war" if the new governor takes office Thursday. Bullets or ballots? It's not even a question in most of Mexico, which is enjoying a new era of clean elections.
NEWS
January 8, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governor of the southeastern state of Chiapas resigned Wednesday in the face of accusations that he ignored warnings of the Christmas-week massacre of 45 unarmed villagers, allegedly carried out by a gang of attackers linked to Mexico's ruling political party. Analysts interpreted the departure of Gov. Julio Cesar Ruiz Ferro as another direct intervention by President Ernesto Zedillo in the troubled state to try to break the stalemate in the 4-year-old conflict with Zapatista rebels.
NEWS
August 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Almost four years after 45 peasants were massacred by paramilitary gunmen, hundreds of Mexican Indians returned to their homes in the southern state of Chiapas on Tuesday, still demanding that all the killers be brought to justice.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
In an effort to salvage peace in the southern state of Chiapas, Mexico's Congress voted to let Zapatista rebels speak before lawmakers to promote an Indian rights bill. Legislators passed a measure requiring at least 100 members of the 628-seat Congress to be present when the rebels make their pitch. Rebel leader Subcommander Marcos said the Zapatistas accepted Congress' proposal and would postpone their return to the jungle, which had been scheduled for today.
NEWS
March 21, 2001 | Associated Press
Expressing "absolute will to achieve peace," President Vicente Fox on Tuesday made a dramatic appeal for a meeting with Zapatista rebel leaders, who say they plan to leave Mexico's capital and head back to the jungle Friday. Fox announced that he will meet more of the rebels' conditions for talks, transforming three military bases into community centers and freeing more Zapatista prisoners.
NEWS
March 17, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for the euphoria over the Chiapas rebels' peaceful caravan journey through Mexico to give way to insults, suspicion and hardball politics. The 16-day motorized march by the 24 commanders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army ended Sunday in Mexico City's main square, the Zocalo, with a rally that was more Woodstock than the revolution the Zapatistas envisioned when they rose up Jan. 1, 1994.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ski-masked leaders of Mexico's Zapatista guerrillas met Monday with congressional mediators in the first serious attempt in nearly five years to address the demands that spurred the rebels' 1994 uprising in the southern state of Chiapas. Subcommander Marcos and 23 fellow commanders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army huddled behind closed doors with federal legislators in a university building in the Mexican capital to begin lobbying for Indian rights legislation.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel leader Subcommander Marcos on Thursday took his campaign for indigenous rights into the heartland of the Mexican Revolution, placing a floral wreath on the spot where peasant hero Emiliano Zapata was assassinated 82 years ago. On the 13th day of a 2,100-mile trek from his base in the southern state of Chiapas to the nation's capital, Marcos pointedly followed Zapata's famous trail in the central state of Morelos.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Negotiations to end the smoldering conflict in Chiapas started Saturday after two days of delays--but without the hundreds of Indian spectators who had crowded around the talks site and without the charismatic Subcommander Marcos. Three hundred military police with nightsticks guarded the perimeter of the site. The Indians in brightly embroidered blouses and beribboned hats--who had camped in the security zone, holding up the talks since Thursday--had left. Marcos never appeared.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ski-masked leaders of Mexico's Zapatista guerrillas met Monday with congressional mediators in the first serious attempt in nearly five years to address the demands that spurred the rebels' 1994 uprising in the southern state of Chiapas. Subcommander Marcos and 23 fellow commanders of the Zapatista National Liberation Army huddled behind closed doors with federal legislators in a university building in the Mexican capital to begin lobbying for Indian rights legislation.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebel leader Subcommander Marcos handed over his assault rifle and silver-plated revolver and left his jungle stronghold here Saturday on a risk-filled 2,000-mile caravan to Mexico City, raising hopes of an end to the seven-year-long Zapatista uprising and of greater rights for all of this country's indigenous peoples.
NEWS
February 2, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political jockeying these days to restart peace negotiations in the southern state of Chiapas sometimes descends to absurd levels. To wit: Will rebel leader Subcommander Marcos take off his ski mask when he emerges from the jungle and testifies before Congress here next month? And if he doesn't, will legislators walk out on him? Yet behind such maneuvering lie divisive issues that could derail one of the key initiatives of Mexican President Vicente Fox's 2-month-old administration.
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