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NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's a beachy getaway that's good now or later. Travelzoo offers a two-night stay at the Rosarito Beach Hotel in Baja, Mexico, for $249 for two people. The deal comes with breakfast, massages and even a bottle of wine. The deal: The Rosarito Beach Escape from Travelzoo offers an inexpensive seaside getaway in Mexico . The resort is about 155 miles from Los Angeles. For two people, it costs $249 for a two-night stay and $329 for a three-night stay. Extras include two 60-minute massages, a bottle of wine and half a dozen margaritas, and daily breakfast.
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WORLD
July 29, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Mexico received more bad economic news Friday with a report that shows poverty is steadily on the rise. The number of Mexicans living in poverty grew to 52 million in 2010, up by more than 3 million people from two years earlier, the report says. That means 46.2% of the population lives in poverty. Within that group, 11.7 million people live in extreme poverty, a figure that held steady over the same period. The report was produced by the National Council for the Evaluation of Social Development Policy, an autonomous but federally financed agency, and represents the state's most comprehensive study of poverty to date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1986
Your recent article "Paralyzed in Mexico" was of special interest to me. I have been involved in a similar situation as a firefighter and friend, and understand the value of many years of friendship with the people and the firefighters of Mexico, which they and many others, including the California Fire Service, have developed. The efforts of Dick Vic, his wife, Carol, and Jack Stubbs on behalf of an injured neighbor, Edward Axton, were as private citizens, but their affiliation with the fire service and the ongoing interaction which occurs through the Bombero Program and many other programs were of untold help in their efforts.
NEWS
April 16, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
A new hotel and several other tourist facilities are scheduled to open during the upcoming year in Riviera Nayarit , one of Mexico 's newest coastal developments. Several resorts in the region, which is north of Puerto Vallarta, also plan to add rooms or make other improvements. "Riviera Nayarit has seen remarkable growth in the development of tourism infrastructure and offerings since our inception in 2007," said Richard Zarkin, public relations manager of Riviera Nayarit Convention and Visitors Bureau.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2011 | By Tim Johnson
U.S. and Mexican officials Wednesday resolved a cross-border long-haul trucking dispute that will lift punitive tariffs on about $2.4 billion in U.S. products. Under the agreement, which ends a nearly two-decade ban on Mexican trucks entering the United States, Mexico will halve the punitive customs duties within the next 10 days and remove the rest by the end of the summer. "The agreements signed today are a win for roadway safety and they are a win for trade," U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said.
WORLD
November 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The amount of money U.S. immigrants send to their families in Latin America has more than doubled since 2000, and the cash flow home -- except to Mexico -- has recovered from a considerable drop during the Great Recession, a 13-year survey of remittance trends shows. For years, remittances have far outpaced foreign aid in helping lift people out of poverty in Latin America, the study released Friday by Pew Research Center notes. In 2011, remittances totaled $53.1 billion, more than eight times the amount of official aid, the report says.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
NOGALES, Ariz. - Gun runners once were so nonchalant about driving into Mexico that one smuggler stashed a .50-caliber rifle on the top of the engine block of a sedan, the weapon visible to anyone who bothered to pop the hood. It was 2010 and word hadn't yet spread that U.S. officials were beefing up outbound inspections, searching for guns that were fueling Mexico's raging drug war. Border agents confiscated the rifle and hundreds of other weapons and ammunition during the first few years of stepped-up enforcement along the southwestern border, federal data show.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and Richard Fausset
The first Honda Fit rolled off the assembly line Friday at a new $800-million factory near Celaya, Mexico, a symbol of the growing might of the country's auto industry. Honda's U.S. factories spit out hundreds of thousands of Accords and Civics each year. But when the automaker redesigned the Fit for North America, it turned to Mexico for an increasingly skilled workforce and favorable export rules. Mexico already accounts for about 18% of North American auto production, but that's expected to jump to 25% by 2020 as automakers pour billion of dollars into factories, said Joe Langley, an analyst at IHS Automotive.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Earlier this year, the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego released “Drug Violence in Mexico,” a report by the institute's Cory Molzahn, Viridiana Ríos and David A. Shirk. Looking for broader perspective on the estimated 50,000 drug-war killings in Mexico since December 2006, the researchers compared Mexico's overall homicide statistics with other nations'. They found that Mexico's overall homicide rate was about 18 per 100,000 inhabitants - “uncomfortably high,” yet also “about average for the hemisphere.” In fact, that figure matches rates for the city of Los Angeles in the troubled early 1990s.
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