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OPINION
May 2, 2013
Re "Congress, rethink that wall," Opinion, April 29 Former Mexican President Vicente Fox has spent much of his political career trying to convince us that shipping the poor from Mexico to the United States is a good thing. I wonder what would have happened if he had spent his six-year presidency improving the Mexican economy so that his citizens did not feel the need to flee their country. Additionally, it is hypocritical to condemn our security measures while Mexico stations law enforcement and military personnel on its southern border to prevent illegal immigration from Central and South America.
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NEWS
May 14, 2011 | By Avital Binshtock, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The band Buckcherry headlines "ShipRocked," a five-day musical party aboard the Poesia. It’s a new ship stocked with distinctive restaurants, a spa, two pools, four hot tubs and a three-level theater, plus additional stages for other acts that’ll be riling up rock-loving crowds. The ship stops at popular Caribbean beaches along the Mayan Riviera, where travelers can dive, shop or check out the bar scene. Itinerary : Fort Lauderdale, Fla., to Costa Maya and Cozumel, Mexico, and back Dates : Nov. 14-19 Price : From $949, double occupancy, including meals, accommodations, concerts and special events.
OPINION
June 29, 2012
Re "Don't fear a PRI win," Opinion, June 24 Jorge G. Castañeda practically equates the likely triumph of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in Sunday's presidential election with the ultimate validation of the democratic achievements of the Mexican people. I view the PRI's return another way: the ultimate corroboration of how economic power can impose a candidate despite the democratic aspirations of the Mexican people. David Soto West Hills ALSO: Letters: Fighting polio in Pakistan Letters: A fair deal for online poker Letters: Historical ruling on healthcare  
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
Mexican President Felipe Calderon stopped in Cuba this week, en route to the Colombian port city of Cartagena for the Summit of the Americas. Calderon's visit to the island nation is interesting for several reasons. Mexico-Cuba relations were strained in 2002 after then-President Vicente Fox criticized Cuba's human rights record. That same year, the Mexican leader invited Cuba to attend a summit but, in a private conversation, Fox asked Cuba's Fidel Castro to leave Mexico before then-President George W. Bush arrived.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Earlier this year, the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego released “Drug Violence in Mexico,” a report by the institute's Cory Molzahn, Viridiana Ríos and David A. Shirk. Looking for broader perspective on the estimated 50,000 drug-war killings in Mexico since December 2006, the researchers compared Mexico's overall homicide statistics with other nations'. They found that Mexico's overall homicide rate was about 18 per 100,000 inhabitants - “uncomfortably high,” yet also “about average for the hemisphere.” In fact, that figure matches rates for the city of Los Angeles in the troubled early 1990s.
NEWS
October 11, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
After more than four decades in business, Arte de Mexico owner Jerry Stoffers has announced that he will close his 250,000-square-foot North Hollywood showroom complex early next year. Everything in the showroom will be liquidated at reduced prices: Hand-carved antique doors from India that were $2,000 to $6,000 will start at $595, and hand-carved wooden columns and sculpted marble colums from India that had been $1,500 to $3,000 will begin at $499. Accent chairs will start at $299 and ottomans at $99. Carved stone statues from Malaysia will start at $299, amethyst geodes from Brazil will start at $599, hand-carved antique doors from Mexico (an inexpensive coffee table top, perhaps?
NEWS
January 1, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
It's Mexico, cruising to victory by a mile despite a limp. Then comes Canada, followed by the United Kingdom, the Dominican Republic and France. No, these are not early Winter Olympic results. These are the U.S. travelers' five top foreign destinations, as measured by a new survey of travel data from 2012. In that year, U.S. residents made 20.3 million trips to Mexico (mostly by land); 11.9 million trips to Canada (again, mostly by land); 2.5 million trips to the U.K., 2.3 million to the Dominican Republic and 2 million to France.
WORLD
September 7, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
In the parched Mexican countryside, the corn is wilting, the wheat stunted. And here in this vast and thirsty capital, officials are rationing water and threatening worse cuts as Mexico endures one of the driest spells in more than half a century. A months-long drought has affected broad swaths of the country, from the U.S. border to the Yucatan Peninsula, leaving crop fields parched and many reservoirs low. The need for rain is so dire that water officials have been rooting openly for a hurricane or two to provide a good drenching.
OPINION
October 22, 2011
Since June 2008, The Times has been reporting on the drug-related violence on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border. The series is labeled "Mexico Under Siege" and has included more than 300 articles to date. The Oct. 9 installment prompted reader John Fries of Long Beach to write: "Now yet another article under the headline or title 'Mexico Under Siege.' As a frequent traveler to Mexico, most recently three weeks driving in Yucatan, I object to the insinuation contained in this title.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By David Pierson
Mexico has blocked imports of Foster Farms chicken from three central California processing facilities linked to an outbreak of salmonella. The Mexican government told the U.S. Department of Agriculture on Tuesday it was removing from its list of approved exporters two Foster Farms plants in Fresno and one in Livingston, where the poultry company is headquartered. The three plants were identified by the USDA as the likely origins of a salmonella outbreak that has sickened at least 338 people across the U.S. since March.
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