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WORLD
June 14, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
The instructions aren't on any box of medicine, but Mexicans know them all the same: At the first sign of sore throat or fever, race to the pharmacy for antibiotics. Take as you see fit. Even though the law requires a prescription for antibiotics, pharmacists in Mexico seldom ask for one before handing them over. And they hand them over by the boatload: nearly 2 billion doses of antibiotics a year, enough for two full courses of treatment for almost each of the nation's 110 million people.
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WORLD
April 27, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
On Wednesday, a top Health Ministry official, Mauricio Hernandez, deputy secretary for prevention, told Mexicans that a small uptick in flu deaths "by no means indicates an epidemic." Scarcely 24 hours later, the government went on late-night television to issue an emergency decree closing all schools, from day care through university, in Mexico City and the state of Mexico, affecting nearly 7 million students.
WORLD
July 11, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood
The grief-numbed parents of Hermosillo buried their babies and waited for answers. When none came, they marched. When they got desperate, they traveled the thousand miles to Mexico City and marched some more. They carried banners with photos of their children -- 48 in all -- killed when fire tore through a crowded day-care center named ABC. More than a month after the June 5 blaze in the northern state of Sonora, satisfying answers are in short supply.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times staff writer
Earlier this year, the Trans-Border Institute at the University of San Diego released “Drug Violence in Mexico,” a report by the institute's Cory Molzahn, Viridiana Ríos and David A. Shirk. Looking for broader perspective on the estimated 50,000 drug-war killings in Mexico since December 2006, the researchers compared Mexico's overall homicide statistics with other nations'. They found that Mexico's overall homicide rate was about 18 per 100,000 inhabitants - “uncomfortably high,” yet also “about average for the hemisphere.” In fact, that figure matches rates for the city of Los Angeles in the troubled early 1990s.
WORLD
June 2, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
Mexico's reeling economy received another jolt of bad news Monday with reports of the largest monthly decline yet in the amount of money Mexicans working abroad send home. Remittances for the month of April totaled about $1.7 billion, 18.6% less than the $2.1 billion recorded in April 2008, Mexico's central bank said. After oil, remittances are Mexico's largest source of income, and their decline is certain to further erode the country's economic growth.
WORLD
November 15, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
The amount of money U.S. immigrants send to their families in Latin America has more than doubled since 2000, and the cash flow home -- except to Mexico -- has recovered from a considerable drop during the Great Recession, a 13-year survey of remittance trends shows. For years, remittances have far outpaced foreign aid in helping lift people out of poverty in Latin America, the study released Friday by Pew Research Center notes. In 2011, remittances totaled $53.1 billion, more than eight times the amount of official aid, the report says.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Mexico ranked 10th among the world's most popular tourist destinations, according to the latest estimate by a United Nations agency. But the country's head of tourism said she fears Mexico might drop a couple of spots, falling out of the top 10 list. "We have indications that we may drop one or two places, but we're not sure because the figures aren't ours, they are from the World Tourism Organization," Mexico's Tourism Secretary Claudia Ruiz Massieu told the Associated Press Monday.
SPORTS
March 17, 2010 | By Kevin Baxter
Mario Enriquez, his 9-year-old son Brian and a bulldog wearing a Mexican soccer jersey were all part of a sellout crowd of more than 30,000 that crammed Territorio Santos Modelo on Wednesday for a festival, a wrestling exhibition, competing mariachi concerts, a dressage demonstration and a celebration of Mexico's bicentennial. Oh, and not coincidentally, they followed that up with a soccer game in the adjoining stadium, one that saw Mexico score twice in the second half to beat North Korea, 2-1. "It's great to see this many people come out and support the national team," Enriquez said.
SPORTS
March 15, 2009 | Kevin Baxter
Halfway through the Mexican national team's morning workout Saturday, a man slowly wheeled a cart full of baseballs toward the middle of the infield. Not every team has the luxury of using a 17-year major league veteran and Cy Young Award winner to keep its batting practice pitcher supplied with balls. But in this case, Fernando Valenzuela was only too eager to oblige. "Whatever they need," Valenzuela said. "I'm real, real happy to be part of this."
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