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March 22, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Another antiquities auction has turned into another international art dispute. This time it's the sale , scheduled for Friday and Saturday at Sotheby's in Paris, of the Barbier-Mueller Collection of Pre-Columbian art from Mexico and Central and South America. The Mexican government's National Institute of Anthropology and History is demanding a halt to the sale of 51 of the 313 works in the auction, according to the Associated Press, saying they are Mexican national property.
June 14, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
The instructions aren't on any box of medicine, but Mexicans know them all the same: At the first sign of sore throat or fever, race to the pharmacy for antibiotics. Take as you see fit. Even though the law requires a prescription for antibiotics, pharmacists in Mexico seldom ask for one before handing them over. And they hand them over by the boatload: nearly 2 billion doses of antibiotics a year, enough for two full courses of treatment for almost each of the nation's 110 million people.
February 24, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and Richard Fausset
The first Honda Fit rolled off the assembly line Friday at a new $800-million factory near Celaya, Mexico, a symbol of the growing might of the country's auto industry. Honda's U.S. factories spit out hundreds of thousands of Accords and Civics each year. But when the automaker redesigned the Fit for North America, it turned to Mexico for an increasingly skilled workforce and favorable export rules. Mexico already accounts for about 18% of North American auto production, but that's expected to jump to 25% by 2020 as automakers pour billion of dollars into factories, said Joe Langley, an analyst at IHS Automotive.
December 1, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
Amy Neiman and her husband, Alan, were in Mexico in November during the Dia de Los Muertos holiday. Near the Templo de Santo Domingo de Guzmán in Oaxaca, they saw people gathered for a parade, and one couple in particular stood out. "I was struck by the colors, the creativity, the seriousness of the young people," Neiman said. The woman's gown is made from Styrofoam cups, paper plates and plastic utensils. The Venice resident used an iPhone 4S.  To submit your photos, click the upload button below.
July 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Here's a beachy getaway that's good now or later. Travelzoo offers a two-night stay at the Rosarito Beach Hotel in Baja, Mexico, for $249 for two people. The deal comes with breakfast, massages and even a bottle of wine. The deal: The Rosarito Beach Escape from Travelzoo offers an inexpensive seaside getaway in Mexico . The resort is about 155 miles from Los Angeles. For two people, it costs $249 for a two-night stay and $329 for a three-night stay. Extras include two 60-minute massages, a bottle of wine and half a dozen margaritas, and daily breakfast.
February 9, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. State Departmenthas issued an updated travel warning for tourists planning to visit Mexico, adding more detailed information on drug violence on a state-by-state and city-by-city basis. The new warning comes in response to concerns by Mexico tourism officials, who worried that previous travel warnings scared off U.S. tourists by generalizing about the threat of crime violence in Mexico. Mexican officials welcomed the update. "The Mexico Tourism Board has long advocated for travel advisories which abide by three key [tenets]
Mexico's drug war is bound to have a profound effect on the lives of Mexican immigrants in the United States. On the one hand, the image of Mexico's chaos as a spreading contagion most likely will strengthen the hand of anti-immigrant forces. On the other, as Mexican newcomers look back at their increasingly dangerous homeland, they will -- consciously or unconsciously -- set down deeper roots in the United States.
March 27, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Terroir . Wild yeasts. Elevation. Who knew these terms could apply to mezcal as easily as to wine. In fact, "the vocabulary of mezcal is more like the vocabulary of wine than spirits," explains Ron Cooper, the California artist who founded Del Maguey single-village mezcals 20 years ago when the beverage wasn't on anybody's radar. "We're talking about terroir , about mouth feel," he says. "We're talking about aroma, nose. " He can go on for hours, recounting the long history of mezcal made in remote villages hours off dirt roads.
September 10, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
President Obama sought to calm a diplomatic furor, disputing Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton's assertion that Mexico has begun to look like Colombia at the height of its struggle against a drug-financed insurgency. Obama's comments, in an interview published Thursday by the Los Angeles-based Spanish-language newspaper La Opinion, followed an outcry that began in Mexico after Clinton told a foreign policy group Wednesday that Mexico "is looking more and more like Colombia looked 20 years ago, where the narco-traffickers controlled certain parts of the country.
December 17, 2013 | By Joseph Serna
After more than two and a half years on the run, a Pomona man is expected to face charges for a 2011 fatal drive-by shooting, Los Angeles County prosecutors said. Ruben Vargas, 37, is scheduled to be arraigned Jan. 14 on a murder charge in the 2011 shooting death of Lina Romero , 31. Pomona police say Vargas and 27-year-old Andrew Alvarez drove by a home in the 600 block of Illinois Street and unleashed a barrage of gunfire into a home, hitting Romero, who was inside. She died about a month later in the hospital, turning the case into a homicide.
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