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WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Mexican commuters are furious over a disastrous design failure that has forced the closure of one of this huge city's busiest and newest subway lines. Nearly half a million passengers have had to find alternative transportation after officials shut down most of Line 12, which runs about 15 miles from south of the capital toward its heart. It could take six months or more to repair all of the damage, said officials, who attributed most of the problems to train wheels that are incompatible with the rails.
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NATIONAL
March 13, 2014 | By Neela Banerjee
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency and BP announced Thursday an agreement that would allow the energy giant to bid once again on deep-water offshore drilling leases, reversing a government decision two years ago to bar the company from federal contracts following its massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In what became the country's worst offshore environmental disaster, BP's Macondo well blew out in April 2010, killing 11 workers and spewing more than 4 million barrels of oil into the gulf.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - If nothing else, the slaying of cartel boss Nazario Moreno Gonzalez by Mexican soldiers may have burst the bubble of mysticism that had made him one of the stranger figures to emerge in the country's drug war. Moreno, whose nicknames included "El Mas Loco" ("The Craziest"), was a founder of Michoacan state's La Familia drug cartel and its offshoot, the Knights Templar - groups that have moved massive amounts of methamphetamine and other drugs north to the United States.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2014 | By Cindy Carcamo
FARMINGTON, N.M. - In World War II he served as a Navajo code talker, one of the Marines who became legendary by using their native tongue to transmit messages the enemy could not decipher. Years later, to express its appreciation, the Navajo Nation built Tom Jones Jr. a house. These days the 89-year-old Jones struggles to keep warm during winter because the only heat inside his house emanates from an antique wood stove in the living room. The electricity doesn't work in his bathroom and the floor has worn away, exposing plywood beneath his feet.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
California loves Tesla Motors. The Palo Alto electric car maker's Model S sedan is the state's new eco-luxury status symbol. Californians bought more than a third of Teslas sold globally last year. Residents of the state pack the order list for Tesla's next offering, a sport utility vehicle. California pollution-control policies enable Tesla to rake in tens of millions of dollars each year from selling environmental credits to other automakers - a key source of Tesla's revenue.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
The Energy Department, dealing with twin setbacks in its long effort to deal with Cold War-era radioactive waste, said Tuesday it was stopping construction of a massive plant in South Carolina to handle surplus plutonium and proceeding with an investigation into a leak at a nuclear dump in New Mexico that exposed 13 workers to airborne plutonium. In releasing its fiscal 2015 budget, energy officials said they were stopping construction of the "mixed oxide fuel" plant at the Savannah River site in South Carolina.
WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - When historians write about 21st century Los Angeles, they'll probably observe that Eric Garcetti was the second Spanish-speaking L.A. mayor in a row to make an official visit to the Mexican capital. They may also note how trips such as his trade mission this week reflected the increasingly intimate cultural and economic ties between Los Angeles and its sister megalopolis to the south. But some of the subtleties of the experience may be lost to posterity if it is not also noted that Garcetti, like his predecessor, Antonio Villaraigosa, speaks a version of the language that, for lack of a more scientific term, might be called Funky American Business Spanish.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Southwest Airlines, the nation's biggest domestic carrier, continued its expansion into international destinations by announcing new daily routes to Mexico and the Bahamas. The new routes represent only the second batch of international destinations that the Dallas-based carrier will begin to serve starting this summer. In January, Southwest announced that its first venture into international destinations will be to three beach cities in the Bahamas starting in July. Southwest said Monday that it is adding daily nonstop service to Cancun and Los Cabos in Mexico and to Nassau in the Bahamas starting in August.
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Richard A. Serrano
MEXICO CITY - With the arrest of Sinaloa cartel boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the leadership of Mexico's largest and most sophisticated illegal drug operation has probably transferred to Ismael "El Mayo" Zambada, a 66-year-old former farmer with a knack for business - and maintaining a low profile. But Zambada is likely to discover, much as Guzman did, that inheriting the throne of top capo comes with a series of complications worthy of a Shakespearean king. Like his predecessor, Zambada is a country boy made good who hails from the badlands of Sinaloa, the traditional heart of Mexican drug-smuggling culture.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Now we have an idea why the U.S. Customs and Border Protection service was keeping secret an independent report of its encounters at the Mexican border. Because it has something to hide. As The Times' Brian Bennett reported last week, an independent report by the nonprofit Police Executive Research Forum sharply criticized the agency for a "lack of diligence" in investigating fatal encounters involving its agents. The report, based on internal case files of 67 shooting incidents leading to 19 deaths between January 2010 and October 2012, also faulted some of the agents' practices, including positioning themselves in the "exit path" of fleeing vehicles apparently as a pretext for opening fire in self-defense.
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