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Mgm Grand Air

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TRAVEL
August 7, 1994
MGM Grand Air, which has focused mainly on first-class charter service, will begin scheduled commercial service between New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas on Sept. 8. Company officials said the idea is to link America's two largest cities with Las Vegas, the nation's fastest growing market. There will be two round-trip flights between LAX and JFK daily, except Saturdays and on Thursday and Sunday, one flight that makes a loop from LAX to Las Vegas to New York and back.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny but posh MGM Grand Air--which catered to the entertainment elite with gourmet meals and private rooms--has gone out of business after its billionaire owner, Kirk Kerkorian, sold its six jets to a Midwestern air cargo and charter operator for an undisclosed amount. The exclusive airline, whose Los Angeles-to-New York flight cost $1,400 and seated only 34 passengers, was renowned for shuttling movie stars, rock singers and Hollywood executives.
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BUSINESS
April 25, 1990 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MGM Grand Air has opened a little more room at the top of the luxury flying experience. The company announced Tuesday that it is adding three reconfigured DC-8s to its fleet, enabling it to more than double passenger capacity between Los Angeles and New York. The airliner also hopes to use the planes for nonstop international flights in the future. MGM Grand Air, which offers only first-class service, is known for its super-luxurious amenities.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny but posh MGM Grand Air--which catered to the entertainment elite with gourmet meals and private rooms--has gone out of business after its billionaire owner, Kirk Kerkorian, sold its six jets to a Midwestern air cargo and charter operator for an undisclosed amount. The exclusive airline, whose Los Angeles-to-New York flight cost $1,400 and seated only 34 passengers, was renowned for shuttling movie stars, rock singers and Hollywood executives.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1987 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
F. Michael Rogers, a retired Air Force general, says he thinks he knows what well-heeled civilians want when it comes to air travel. He is putting his idea to the test Tuesday when MGM Grand Air, a luxury airline with a glitzy name, begins transcontinental service from Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny but posh MGM Grand Air--which catered to the entertainment elite with gourmet meals and private rooms--has gone out of business after its billionaire owner, Kirk Kerkorian, sold its six jets to a Midwestern air cargo and charter operator for an undisclosed amount. The exclusive airline, whose Los Angeles-to-New York flight cost $1,400 and seated only 34 passengers, was renowned for shuttling movie stars, rock singers and Hollywood executives.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
A dozen or so people gathered in comfort at Los Angeles International Airport's Imperial Terminal one recent sunny afternoon to wait for a flight bound for New York City. Some arrived in limousines reserved for them by the airline's "concierge." The seats in the passenger lounge were soft; the drinks were cool. There were no crowds, no lines and no stranded passengers tripping over each other.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
No passengers choked on their caviar. And none fell out of their specially designed sleeper seats. But there was a hushed mumbling among pampered passengers on a recent MGM Grand Air jet from Los Angeles to New York. They were among the first to learn that the airline that had prided itself on first-class-only service was about to introduce--horror of horrors--coach class. What next? Vinyl handbags at Gucci? Brass rings at Tiffany? Or maybe a Rolls-Royce with an optional V-6?
NEWS
September 13, 1987 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, Times Staff Writer
Champagne corks popped in the skies over El Segundo this week as MGM Grand Air launched a much-heralded service offering airborne opulence from Los Angeles to New York. There was little celebration on the ground, however, as the El Segundo City Council considered its options in its fight to ground MGM. The airline has started the first scheduled service out of Los Angeles International Airport's Imperial Terminal, which the city has been trying to shut down for years because of jet noise.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1990 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MGM Grand Air, the airline that has created a niche as an ultra-luxurious way for the wealthy and famous to travel on all first-class planes between America's coasts, will add coach class this summer, the company announced Monday. But passengers in the two classes won't even see each other, the airline's president claimed. The new service will begin on Aug. 16 when the carrier puts its three newly acquired DC-8 Super 62 airliners into service.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Champagne and caviar are to MGM Grand Air what soft drinks and peanuts are to other domestic carriers. And now the luxury airline, which most recently had been offering upscale charter flights, has unveiled what the company dubs the "Golden Triangle" of scheduled service to Los Angeles, New York and Las Vegas, which is the hub. The airline has one goal: carrying guests in style to the airline's sister company, the opulent MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas.
TRAVEL
August 7, 1994
MGM Grand Air, which has focused mainly on first-class charter service, will begin scheduled commercial service between New York, Los Angeles and Las Vegas on Sept. 8. Company officials said the idea is to link America's two largest cities with Las Vegas, the nation's fastest growing market. There will be two round-trip flights between LAX and JFK daily, except Saturdays and on Thursday and Sunday, one flight that makes a loop from LAX to Las Vegas to New York and back.
BUSINESS
April 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert L. Gould Named MGM Grand Air President, CEO: The charter airline said Gould will succeed Charles Demoney, who resigned to pursue other interests. Gould, 54, most recently served as president and chief operating officer of Eastern Airlines. Prior to that, he spent 25 years with Pan American World Airways, where he served in positions ranging from pilot to senior vice president.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
MGM Grand Air, which caters to wealthy travelers with private first-class compartments and stand-up bars, on Thursday said it will scrap its money-losing scheduled flight service in favor of air charters. Founded by reclusive financier Kirk Kerkorian five years ago, MGM Grand Air's gilded Los Angeles-to-New York service fell victim to the recession and intense airline industry competition, said President Charles Demoney.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | PAUL JACOBS and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal authorities conducting a criminal investigation of Mark L. Nathanson's activities as coastal commissioner also are delving into his role in launching billionaire Kirk Kerkorian's luxury-class airline, MGM Grand Air, The Times has learned. Nathanson's work for Kerkorian also underscored the benefits stemming from his relationship with his political patron, Assembly Speaker Willie Brown.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
MGM Grand Sells Shares: The Las Vegas casino developer and owner of MGM Grand Air said it raised $200 million through a stock rights offering at $12 a share. Existing MGM stockholders bought 8,870,941 shares, of which 8,333,334 were bought by Tracinda Corp., the Kirk Kerkorian-led investment firm that already was MGM Grand's major stockholder. New investors bought 7,150,000 shares. The stock was sold through brokerage Bear, Stearns & Co. MGM closed at $12.125 on the New York Stock Exchange.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tiny but posh MGM Grand Air--which catered to the entertainment elite with gourmet meals and private rooms--has gone out of business after its billionaire owner, Kirk Kerkorian, sold its six jets to a Midwestern air cargo and charter operator for an undisclosed amount. The exclusive airline, whose Los Angeles-to-New York flight cost $1,400 and seated only 34 passengers, was renowned for shuttling movie stars, rock singers and Hollywood executives.
BUSINESS
January 29, 1991
In response to several letters to the editor (Jan. 22), I would like to say that many of us who oppose this war have been protesting for peace and justice in many other situations. I question why George Bush is not doing the same. Many of us who protest this war have become angry at the lack of concern he shows toward the vast numbers of social problems plaguing our society.
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