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February 4, 2009 | Associated Press
After a triumphant tour that won critical raves in New York, Miami City Ballet is cutting eight dancers because it can't afford to pay them. Ballet spokeswoman Nicolle Ugarriza says the corps and apprentice dancers' contracts will not be renewed next season. The dancers were notified last week in a letter from the ballet's artistic director and chief executive officer, Edward Villella. The cuts will reduce the troupe from 53 to 45 dancers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2013 | By Laura Bleiberg
“Le Corsaire,” the ballet equivalent of the movie matinee adventure tale, has been tweaked by successive generations of choreographers with one goal uppermost: to raise excitement and audience neck hairs through nonstop dancer bravura. At American Ballet Theatre, it is the danseurs' derring-do, mostly, that thrills. The company's contingent of male elites - from principals to its corps de ballet  -  brought out all their tricks and then some Friday night at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion as they reprised Anna-Maria Holmes' three-act staging from 1998.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2001 | JENNIFER FISHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On days when the news is almost all harrowing, there's a lot to be said for encountering the securely interlocking structures and radiant beauty of Balanchine ballets. Often credited with capturing the vigor and optimism of America, while retaining the haunting elegance of imperial Russian classicism, George Balanchine was a choreographer who courted transcendence--and often delivered.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By David Ng
Mike Piazza, the former major league baseball player, is taking on an unconventional post-retirement job. The athlete is teaming up with Miami City Ballet and will perform a role in the company's production of George Balanchine's "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue. " But don't expect the baseball star to wear leotards or a codpiece. And don't expect him to dance, leap or lift female dancers, the company said. Piazza will appear in one performance of the ballet -- on May 3 at the Adrienne Arsht Center in Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1995 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Pawing the air with her legs as if stroking them against satin sheets, Iliana Lopez managesto make the ghastly lifts in "Transtangos" into spatial autographs--a testament to her star status at Miami City Ballet. Dangling in splits upside down, she becomes all legs, stretching them wide enough to claim the Orange County Performing Arts Center as conquered territory and the Friday audience as her vassals.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1999 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE CRITIC
The sleek, moneyed, increasingly European San Francisco Ballet normally owns the Balanchine franchise in the Bay Area. But not this week, when the younger, hotter Miami City Ballet is dancing the West Coast premiere of Balanchine's full-length "Jewels" in UC Berkeley's Zellerbach Hall. In a staging by company ballet mistress Eve Lawson on Thursday, the first of three performances on the UC campus, Miami's "Jewels" glowed with energy and glittered with sharp choreographic detail. .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1992 | SUSAN REITER, Susan Reiter is a free-lance writer based in New York
The image of his dancing is frozen in memory--most famously, the powerful leap in George Balanchine's "Prodigal Son": suspended in midair, muscular thighs clenched, his face full of rage and determination. From the late 1950s through the mid-'70s, when he danced that and many other enduring roles with New York City Ballet, Edward Villella became one of the most famous American male ballet dancers of his era--perhaps the nation's first widely celebrated male ballet star.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2003 | Donna Perlmutter, Special to The Times
For all of its 17 years, the Miami City Ballet has been the bearer of glad Balanchine tidings -- thanks to company founder Edward Villella. The former New York City Ballet star has happily capitalized on his legacy by filling his repertory -- especially on tour -- with brand-name Balanchine. And receptive audiences have rewarded the Miamians. "We do have this reputation," says Villella of the high marks given his company for its authoritative way with the master's dances.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1995 | Laurie Horn, Laurie Horn is the dance critic for the Miami Herald.
"Free. Exciting. Energetic. Happy." Iliana Lopez, the most finely tuned of Miami City Ballet's ballerinas, is grabbing for adjectives to describe Edward Villella's 9-year-old company, which opens a three-day run Friday at the Orange County Center for the Performing Arts. The words also could describe Lopez herself. "People ask us, why didn't you go to American Ballet Theatre or New York City Ballet?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
IF the cards had been dealt differently, the New York-born, Italian American Edward Villella might easily have found work on TV's "The Sopranos" or "Everybody Loves Raymond," or even forged a big-screen career a la Pacino or De Niro. But where the acting world was denied, the universe of dance gained one of its most vivid presences.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Miami City Ballet and the Miami Heat have more than grace under fire in common: They share a 25th anniversary, and basketball superstars LeBron James and Dwyane Wade are helping mark the occasion. The players are teaming up, so to speak, with ballerinas to commemorate their silver anniversaries this year. As part of the "Ballet and Basketball" celebration, the team and company are reenacting a photograph taken before the first-ever Heat game or Miami Ballet performance. The 25-year-old picture shows towering Heat player Billy Thompson posing with a dancer for the original company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | Associated Press
After a triumphant tour that won critical raves in New York, Miami City Ballet is cutting eight dancers because it can't afford to pay them. Ballet spokeswoman Nicolle Ugarriza says the corps and apprentice dancers' contracts will not be renewed next season. The dancers were notified last week in a letter from the ballet's artistic director and chief executive officer, Edward Villella. The cuts will reduce the troupe from 53 to 45 dancers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2008 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Miami City Ballet will forgo a live orchestra and will perform to recorded music for the second half of its 2008-09 season to save money. Blaming the economy, ballet officials said Tuesday that they cut the orchestra because of declining ticket sales and donor contributions. Live music for a full season would cost $480,000, but only $188,280 had been raised so far. Musicians will play during ballet performances through January, except for the company's holiday schedule of "George Balanchine's the Nutcracker," which will feature taped music.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008 | Diane Haithman
The latest economy-related casualty in the arts: The planned June 26-28 performances of the Nederlands Dans Theater I, part of the ongoing Music Center dance season at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, have been canceled. There will be no replacement. Josephine Ramirez, the Music Center's vice president of programming and planning, said that there was reduced donor giving, a decline in investment revenue and a shortfall in ticket sales for the dance series' most recent engagement, Miami City Ballet, Oct. 24-26.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2008 | Laura Bleiberg, Bleiberg is a freelance writer.
Here's a suggestion: Let's ditch the nightclub as a setting for ballet. No more predictable tales about the trials of courtship or the ballroom as a metaphor for life. Miami City Ballet, Edward Villella's smart and spirited South Florida company, inaugurated the '08-'09 Music Center dance season this past weekend with yet another piece staged in a dark club frequented by prowling, brawling guys and preening, teasing girls. This theme has outlived its variations. Enough already.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
"Dances at a Gathering" wasn't Jerome Robbins' first -- or last -- choreography to piano pieces by Chopin, but it's surely the most intuitive, full of dances that develop out of a single gesture or refuse to develop at all and are abandoned like half-considered ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In just 20 years, Miami City Ballet has become a great success story in American dance, establishing in a community almost as multicultural as our own a much-loved company of homegrown stars showcased in world-class repertory. There was much for L.A. to enjoy and envy in the company's scrupulous execution of major works by Robbins, Balanchine and Tharp on Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jimmy Gamonet de los Heros, resident choreographer of the Miami City Ballet, is a mixmaster of an unusual sort. A neoclassicist of the Balanchine school, he's making his mark with ballets that are as likely to be inspired by computer programs as Andean marriage rituals. In fact, the combination of old and new, European and Latin American influences, is a trademark not just of the man, but of the acclaimed young company to which he belongs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2006 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
In just 20 years, Miami City Ballet has become a great success story in American dance, establishing in a community almost as multicultural as our own a much-loved company of homegrown stars showcased in world-class repertory. There was much for L.A. to enjoy and envy in the company's scrupulous execution of major works by Robbins, Balanchine and Tharp on Friday at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2006 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
IF the cards had been dealt differently, the New York-born, Italian American Edward Villella might easily have found work on TV's "The Sopranos" or "Everybody Loves Raymond," or even forged a big-screen career a la Pacino or De Niro. But where the acting world was denied, the universe of dance gained one of its most vivid presences.
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