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February 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
When it comes to love, mice are ahead of humans by a nose. Researchers have discovered that mice, when deciding whether to mate, use a "second nose," which figures out gender, status and even if romantic feelings are mutual. The more familiar nose may tell an animal where food is, but a separate organ, called the vomeronasal organ, opens up a different world of perception, said Lawrence Katz, an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Duke University.
July 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven deer mice found in Loma Linda, Yucaipa and Mentone were confirmed to carry the potentially fatal hantavirus, state officials said Thursday. The last reported case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the disease in its human form, occurred in the area about two years ago in a Highland resident, who survived the infection. The disease was recognized only 12 years ago, but there have been 43 human cases -- with 25% fatalities -- in California and more than 380 cases nationwide.
September 15, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Two research groups working independently reported Wednesday that they have for the first time created a functioning human immune system in mice by implanting human tissues in a strain of mice that have no immune system. This remarkable feat, the researchers said, should make it possible to study the effects of the AIDS virus on the human immune system without endangering people and thereby develop new clues about how to treat and possibly prevent this modern plague.
May 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sooty air pollution can cause genetic damage in mice that can be passed along to offspring, Canadian researchers reported in this week's issue of the journal Science. The team from Ontario's McMaster University found that the culprit was airborne particulate matter, better known as soot, and was concerned that it could produce the same damage in humans. The specific DNA changes observed in sperm aren't linked to disease, but they're similar to a type of damage that is.
By adding a single gene to fertilized eggs, Princeton University researchers have been able to create smarter mice, a feat that could lead to the development of more intelligent animals and that hints at the feasibility of producing so-called designer babies with enhanced intelligence. The accomplishment demonstrates for the first time that a complex trait like intelligence can be genetically manipulated in mammals.
May 18, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
In an age of long commutes, late sports practices, endless workdays and 24/7 television programming, the image of Mom hanging up her dish towel at 7 p.m. and declaring "the kitchen is closed" seems a quaint relic of an earlier era. It also harks back to a thinner America. And that may be no coincidence. A new study, conducted on mice, hints at an unexpected contributor to the nation's epidemic of obesity - and, if later human studies bear it out, a possible way to have our cake and eat it too, with less risk of weight gain and the diseases that come with it. Just eat your cake - or better yet, an apple - earlier.
June 28, 1985 | United Press International
The Interior Department has added a Midwestern bird and three types of mice living on Gulf Coast sand dunes to its list of endangered species, officials said Thursday. The Perdido Key beach mouse is considered the most critically endangered small mammal in the country, the department said. Only 26 of the mice are thought to exist, all of them at Florida Point in Alabama's Gulf State Park.
August 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
The world's largest producer of rare mutant mice for research has resumed near-normal production two years after being heavily damaged by fire. "We are at 90% of pre-fire levels and we expect to reach 100% this fall," said Kenneth Paigen, director of the Jackson Laboratory. Before the May 10, 1989, fire destroyed the mouse production plant, the laboratory was distributing almost 2 million mice annually to 11,200 locations around the world.
October 16, 1992 | From Reuters
Scientists said Thursday they had created a genetically engineered mouse that rapidly develops high levels of artery-hardening cholesterol--an advance that should speed heart disease research. The mice accumulate blood cholesterol levels five times higher than normal even when fed regular diets and their arteries rapidly narrow with fatty deposits, condensing into four months a process that takes 40 years in humans.
A pack of mice mauled a bedridden 89-year-old man at an Australian nursing home, shredding parts of his ears and prompting the government to launch an investigation. Federal Minister for Aging Justine Elliot ordered the probe, saying in a statement that the attack was "extremely disturbing and traumatic for residents and their families." Ray Hopper, a state opposition legislator who was alerted to the mauling by the man's family this week, said the resident was found covered in blood by nursing staff last weekend.
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