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NEWS
December 23, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Stanford scientists have made a major advance in AIDS research by transmitting the disease to mice that have a human immune system. The infected mice, experts said, promise to be valuable tools for studying the development of AIDS as well as for testing new drugs and vaccines. The production of mice with human immune systems was announced only three months ago, after the Stanford scientists had implanted fetal human immune tissues into a special strain of immune-deficient mice.
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SCIENCE
July 22, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
* Adding an extra version of a single gene makes mice grow big brains--brains so large they have to fold up, much as human brains do, to fit inside the skull, researchers said. It is not yet clear whether the mice are smarter (they were all killed soon after birth), but the scientists said they were surprised that one gene had such a strong effect and said they would conduct further experiments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999
Molecular biologists have created a strain of mice that models one of the key features of Alzheimer's disease, the accumulation of "tangles" containing a protein called tau. The tangles, along with another deposit called plaque, are one of the key features of the disease, which affects as many as 4 million Americans. A team from the University of Pennsylvania reports in the November issue of Neuron that it added an extra copy of the tau gene to mice.
SCIENCE
February 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
When it comes to love, mice are ahead of humans by a nose. Researchers have discovered that mice, when deciding whether to mate, use a "second nose," which figures out gender, status and even if romantic feelings are mutual. The more familiar nose may tell an animal where food is, but a separate organ, called the vomeronasal organ, opens up a different world of perception, said Lawrence Katz, an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Duke University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven deer mice found in Loma Linda, Yucaipa and Mentone were confirmed to carry the potentially fatal hantavirus, state officials said Thursday. The last reported case of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, the disease in its human form, occurred in the area about two years ago in a Highland resident, who survived the infection. The disease was recognized only 12 years ago, but there have been 43 human cases -- with 25% fatalities -- in California and more than 380 cases nationwide.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
When it comes to treating pain, a new study suggests traditional Chinese medicine has been getting it right for thousands of years. A chemical compound found in the underground tubers of the Corydalis plant can effectively alleviate three different types of pain in mice, according to a paper published Thursday in the journal Current Biology. The study also shows that mice do not build up a resistance to the naturally occurring compound, which means it could one day be used for managing chronic pain in humans.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Two research groups working independently reported Wednesday that they have for the first time created a functioning human immune system in mice by implanting human tissues in a strain of mice that have no immune system. This remarkable feat, the researchers said, should make it possible to study the effects of the AIDS virus on the human immune system without endangering people and thereby develop new clues about how to treat and possibly prevent this modern plague.
SCIENCE
May 15, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sooty air pollution can cause genetic damage in mice that can be passed along to offspring, Canadian researchers reported in this week's issue of the journal Science. The team from Ontario's McMaster University found that the culprit was airborne particulate matter, better known as soot, and was concerned that it could produce the same damage in humans. The specific DNA changes observed in sperm aren't linked to disease, but they're similar to a type of damage that is.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
By adding a single gene to fertilized eggs, Princeton University researchers have been able to create smarter mice, a feat that could lead to the development of more intelligent animals and that hints at the feasibility of producing so-called designer babies with enhanced intelligence. The accomplishment demonstrates for the first time that a complex trait like intelligence can be genetically manipulated in mammals.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | United Press International
The Interior Department has added a Midwestern bird and three types of mice living on Gulf Coast sand dunes to its list of endangered species, officials said Thursday. The Perdido Key beach mouse is considered the most critically endangered small mammal in the country, the department said. Only 26 of the mice are thought to exist, all of them at Florida Point in Alabama's Gulf State Park.
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