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Michael Brecker

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
In these days of overnight stardom and overblown hype, it is noteworthy that Michael Brecker, a professional musician for 17 years, has just given birth to his first album as a leader. True, there have been several Brecker Brothers recordings with Randy Brecker on trumpet, and six LPs with the group Steps Ahead, which he co-led with Mike Mainieri; but the new release simply titled "Michael Brecker" (MCA/Impulse 5980) finds him heading his own all-star quintet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2008 | Don Heckman
HERBIE HANCOCK'S performance at the Playboy Jazz Festival on Sunday comes in the midst of a bountiful year. Yes, the veteran jazz pianist/composer's Hollywood Hills home glistens with the an impressive collection of Grammys, an Oscar and other awards. But Hancock has never received a statuette with as much cachet as the Album of the Year Grammy he got on Feb. 10 for his recording, "River: The Joni Letters." On Sunday, his Playboy Jazz set will feature numbers from Hancock's acclaimed album, as well as a rare live rendering of his 1983 hit, "Rockit," and guest appearances by singers Sonya Kitchell and Amy Keys, bassist Marcus Miller and DJ C-Minus.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2007
Michael Brecker, a versatile and highly influential jazz tenor saxophonist who won 11 Grammys over a career that spanned more than three decades, died of leukemia Saturday in New York. He was 57. A full obituary will appear in Monday's Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Michael Brecker, the jazz saxophonist who won 11 Grammy Awards and was considered by many the most influential tenor player of his generation, died Saturday at a hospital in New York City. He was 57. The cause of death, according to his manager, Darryl Pitt, was leukemia, the result of Brecker's struggle with myelodysplastic syndrome, a form of cancer in which the bone marrow produces abnormal as well as normal blood cells.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Michael Brecker, the jazz saxophonist who won 11 Grammy Awards and was considered by many the most influential tenor player of his generation, died Saturday at a hospital in New York City. He was 57. The cause of death, according to his manager, Darryl Pitt, was leukemia, the result of Brecker's struggle with myelodysplastic syndrome, a form of cancer in which the bone marrow produces abnormal as well as normal blood cells.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He's won seven Grammys, appeared on more than 500 recordings--from his own to cameos on projects with the likes of Frank Sinatra and Lou Reed--and influenced scores of tenor saxophonists. And though Michael Brecker is one of jazz's unique voices, capable of stone-cold thrilling improvisations balanced by deep emotional moments, he remains remarkably modest about his stature in the modern jazz pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He's won seven Grammys, appeared on over 500 recordings--from his own albums to cameos on projects with Frank Sinatra and hundreds of others--and he's influenced scores of tenor saxophonists. And while he is decidedly one of jazz's unique voices, a man capable of stone-cold thrilling improvisations balanced by deep emotional moments, Michael Brecker remains remarkably modest about his place in jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2005 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
Michael Brecker felt a sharp pain in his back while performing at last August's Mt. Fuji Jazz Festival in Japan, but initially thought it was just another of those ailments afflicting touring musicians that an ice pack or massage could alleviate. Instead, it turned out to be the first outward symptom of a life-threatening disease that has temporarily silenced Brecker's saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2006 | DON HECKMAN
Ornette Coleman, "Sound Grammar" (Sound Grammar). At 76, Coleman continues to be an astonishingly creative adventurer, performing on his first new album in a decade with a two-bass and drums lineup that triggers some of his most imaginative playing -- on alto saxophone, trumpet and violin. * Stefon Harris, "African Tarantella" (Blue Note).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Bill Kohlhaase
Will Robert Stewart be the Pharoah Sanders of the 21st century? This quartet date, like "Judgement," Stewart's 1995 debut release on World Stage records, recalls Sanders' spiritual period of the late '60s, with its emphasis on droning modal frameworks, long, uncomplicated solos and robust tones. The devotional motif contrasts sharply with that of Stewart's previous Qwest recording "In the Gutta" and affords less opportunity for technical displays.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2007
Michael Brecker, a versatile and highly influential jazz tenor saxophonist who won 11 Grammys over a career that spanned more than three decades, died of leukemia Saturday in New York. He was 57. A full obituary will appear in Monday's Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2006 | DON HECKMAN
Ornette Coleman, "Sound Grammar" (Sound Grammar). At 76, Coleman continues to be an astonishingly creative adventurer, performing on his first new album in a decade with a two-bass and drums lineup that triggers some of his most imaginative playing -- on alto saxophone, trumpet and violin. * Stefon Harris, "African Tarantella" (Blue Note).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2005 | Charles J. Gans, Associated Press
Michael Brecker felt a sharp pain in his back while performing at last August's Mt. Fuji Jazz Festival in Japan, but initially thought it was just another of those ailments afflicting touring musicians that an ice pack or massage could alleviate. Instead, it turned out to be the first outward symptom of a life-threatening disease that has temporarily silenced Brecker's saxophone.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The first sounds emanating from the stage at the Cerritos Center on Wednesday easily could have been mistaken for the soundtrack of a '50s science fiction movie. Bloops, bleeps, whirs and thumps suggested the imminent arrival of Dr. Morbius and the cast of "Forbidden Planet." But it was Herbie Hancock who was producing most of the atmospheric clatter -- from a laptop computer -- aided by saxophonist Michael Brecker, trumpeter Roy Hargrove, bassist Scott Colley and drummer Terri Lyne Carrington.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask a young jazz saxophone student who his or her favorite player is, and there's a strong possibility the answer will be Michael Brecker. Look at any of the major jazz awards of the past few years and Brecker's name is usually near the top of the list. All of which may account for the full house that enthusiastically greeted Brecker on Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill in the opening set of a three-night run--his first ever as a leader in a Los Angeles club.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1998 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker is one of those reluctant giants in music, half-hiding in plain sight. His name may not register with the general public, but, in musical circles, Brecker has long been established as one of the preeminent and influential saxophonists of his generation, blessed with fearsome technical finesse as well as melodic charms.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask a young jazz saxophone student who his or her favorite player is, and there's a strong possibility the answer will be Michael Brecker. Look at any of the major jazz awards of the past few years and Brecker's name is usually near the top of the list. All of which may account for the full house that enthusiastically greeted Brecker on Tuesday at Catalina Bar & Grill in the opening set of a three-night run--his first ever as a leader in a Los Angeles club.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Working in front of an audience brings out the best in tenor saxophonist Michael Brecker. Brecker's appearance Friday at Billboard Live in support of his recent "Tales From the Hudson" CD found him working with more determination, more invention and with a better sense of interplay than he does on that studio-recorded album.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1998 | Bill Kohlhaase
Will Robert Stewart be the Pharoah Sanders of the 21st century? This quartet date, like "Judgement," Stewart's 1995 debut release on World Stage records, recalls Sanders' spiritual period of the late '60s, with its emphasis on droning modal frameworks, long, uncomplicated solos and robust tones. The devotional motif contrasts sharply with that of Stewart's previous Qwest recording "In the Gutta" and affords less opportunity for technical displays.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz changed in the early '60s. The highly melodic improvisations and song-oriented selections of bebop, typified by alto sax great Charlie Parker, were usurped by a more direct music of simplified tunes, extremely energized, free-wheeling improvisations and a focus on group interplay--a style exemplified by tenor saxophonist John Coltrane.
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