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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2004
Regarding "The Zipping Point" by Patrick Goldstein (March 28), please allow me to let Michael Copps of the FCC in on a little-known secret. It may hurt. It may come as quite a shock. Howard Stern is not the antichrist. Janet Jackson's breast revelation was not the downfall of civilization as we know it. JC Chasez is not responsible for the ills of society. Mr. Copps, were you aware that a huge asteroid is on a possible collision course with Earth in about 11 years? But I will not be afraid.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For more than 10 years, Democratic Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps played the role of Howard Beale at the regulatory agency. Like the TV anchor from the movie "Network" — the role made famous by the late Oscar-winning actor Peter Finch — he was often mad as hell and not going to take it anymore. Copps, who is resigning from the FCC at the end of the month, has always been far more outspoken than the typical regulator. He was unafraid to offend the powerful companies he was charged to keep in line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
At age 63, having spent most of the last two decades immersed in Washington politics, FCC Commissioner Michael Copps isn't much of a hipster when it comes to identifying the hot hip-hop groups or cool late-night TV shows. But even he's figured out that pop culture consumers young and old believe something has gone horribly wrong when it comes to the diversity of choices in today's entertainment programming.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2009 | Alana Semuels
Now that June 12 has come and gone, it may be time to ask: Who, if anyone, benefits from the mandatory upgrade to digital television transmission? The move inconvenienced millions of Americans who had to obtain converter boxes for their old analog television sets. The government spent billions preparing the viewing public. But advocates and regulators say the expense and hassle was worth it. The government received $19.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For more than 10 years, Democratic Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps played the role of Howard Beale at the regulatory agency. Like the TV anchor from the movie "Network" — the role made famous by the late Oscar-winning actor Peter Finch — he was often mad as hell and not going to take it anymore. Copps, who is resigning from the FCC at the end of the month, has always been far more outspoken than the typical regulator. He was unafraid to offend the powerful companies he was charged to keep in line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1994
Michael L. Copp, an Orange Coast College professor and counselor to the school's athletic teams, died Thursday after suffering a massive heart attack. He was 56. A native of Rockford, Ill., Copp worked as a high school counselor, civics teacher, wrestling and tennis coach in Illinois and California before joining the Orange Coast faculty in 1965. In his first 11 years at the college, Copp taught introductory psychology and worked as a counselor.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Tennessee utility regulator Deborah Taylor Tate to fill a long vacant Republican seat on the Federal Communications Commission, while at the same time naming Michael J. Copps to retain his Democratic seat at the agency. If confirmed by the Senate, Tate and Copps would restore a 3-2 Republican majority at the FCC, clearing the way for agency Chairman Kevin J.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Congress should consider a bill to curb sex and obscenity on television even after cable TV companies Monday said they planned to offer packages of family-friendly channels, a member of the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday. "I don't think we're anywhere near the point where we can say we don't need legislation," Commissioner Michael J. Copps, a Democrat, said at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing in Washington. "Let's keep pushing."
BUSINESS
July 28, 2003 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
For months, Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps waged a lonely campaign to keep the nation's biggest media companies from getting even bigger. Short on funds, the Democrat crisscrossed the country, often unaccompanied by colleagues or staff, and begged universities to give him facilities to hold town meetings to debate media ownership policy. The FCC's Republican chairman, Michael K.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2009 | Alana Semuels
Now that June 12 has come and gone, it may be time to ask: Who, if anyone, benefits from the mandatory upgrade to digital television transmission? The move inconvenienced millions of Americans who had to obtain converter boxes for their old analog television sets. The government spent billions preparing the viewing public. But advocates and regulators say the expense and hassle was worth it. The government received $19.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | Alex Pham
Two days before the nation's television stations switch off their analog signals, the acting chairman of the Federal Communications Commission visited Los Angeles to warn that too many Southern California residents still weren't ready for the change Friday to all-digital TV broadcasts. Michael J. Copps said he feared that as many as 20% of households in major U.S. cities still rely on over-the-air analog broadcasts.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Congress should consider a bill to curb sex and obscenity on television even after cable TV companies Monday said they planned to offer packages of family-friendly channels, a member of the Federal Communications Commission said Tuesday. "I don't think we're anywhere near the point where we can say we don't need legislation," Commissioner Michael J. Copps, a Democrat, said at a Senate Commerce Committee hearing in Washington. "Let's keep pushing."
BUSINESS
November 10, 2005 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
President Bush on Wednesday nominated Tennessee utility regulator Deborah Taylor Tate to fill a long vacant Republican seat on the Federal Communications Commission, while at the same time naming Michael J. Copps to retain his Democratic seat at the agency. If confirmed by the Senate, Tate and Copps would restore a 3-2 Republican majority at the FCC, clearing the way for agency Chairman Kevin J.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2004
Regarding "The Zipping Point" by Patrick Goldstein (March 28), please allow me to let Michael Copps of the FCC in on a little-known secret. It may hurt. It may come as quite a shock. Howard Stern is not the antichrist. Janet Jackson's breast revelation was not the downfall of civilization as we know it. JC Chasez is not responsible for the ills of society. Mr. Copps, were you aware that a huge asteroid is on a possible collision course with Earth in about 11 years? But I will not be afraid.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2004 | Patrick Goldstein, Times Staff Writer
At age 63, having spent most of the last two decades immersed in Washington politics, FCC Commissioner Michael Copps isn't much of a hipster when it comes to identifying the hot hip-hop groups or cool late-night TV shows. But even he's figured out that pop culture consumers young and old believe something has gone horribly wrong when it comes to the diversity of choices in today's entertainment programming.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2003 | Jube Shiver Jr., Times Staff Writer
For months, Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps waged a lonely campaign to keep the nation's biggest media companies from getting even bigger. Short on funds, the Democrat crisscrossed the country, often unaccompanied by colleagues or staff, and begged universities to give him facilities to hold town meetings to debate media ownership policy. The FCC's Republican chairman, Michael K.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | Alex Pham
Two days before the nation's television stations switch off their analog signals, the acting chairman of the Federal Communications Commission visited Los Angeles to warn that too many Southern California residents still weren't ready for the change Friday to all-digital TV broadcasts. Michael J. Copps said he feared that as many as 20% of households in major U.S. cities still rely on over-the-air analog broadcasts.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2002 | Edmund Sanders
Michael J. Copps, the Federal Communications Commission's sole Democrat, said he would hold hearings as early as January on concerns about the proposed relaxation of media ownership rules. FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell has questioned the usefulness of such a proceeding. The move, hailed by consumer groups and some Hollywood unions, increases the political pressure on Powell to convene a formal FCC hearing, rather than risk embarrassing Copps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1994
Michael L. Copp, an Orange Coast College professor and counselor to the school's athletic teams, died Thursday after suffering a massive heart attack. He was 56. A native of Rockford, Ill., Copp worked as a high school counselor, civics teacher, wrestling and tennis coach in Illinois and California before joining the Orange Coast faculty in 1965. In his first 11 years at the college, Copp taught introductory psychology and worked as a counselor.
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