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Michael D Maples

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WORLD
March 11, 2009 | Greg Miller
Al Qaeda has expanded its presence in Afghanistan, taking advantage of the sinking security situation to resurface in the country it was forced to flee seven years ago, the top U.S. military intelligence official testified Tuesday. Army Lt. Gen. Michael D. Maples, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, described Al Qaeda's efforts as one of the reasons for the Obama administration's decision last month to order additional troops to Afghanistan.
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WORLD
March 1, 2006 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Escalating insurgent violence in Afghanistan has placed the fledgling government there in greater peril than at any time since the aftermath of the U.S.-led invasion in 2001, a senior American intelligence official testified Tuesday. The stark assessment comes as sectarian violence soars in Iraq, underscoring the daunting challenges the United States and its allies face years after invading the two countries. In testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee, Lt. Gen. Michael D.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2006 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein's column appears every Sunday. See current and past Brownstein columns on The Times website at latimes.com/brownstein.
President Bush barreled straight ahead with old answers when ABC's Elizabeth Vargas asked him a new question about Iraq last week. And like any driver who missed a turn in the road, the president quickly found himself in a ditch. Vargas sensibly asked Bush how the growing civil strife in Iraq between the majority Shiites and the Sunnis who dominated the country under Saddam Hussein might change the U.S. mission there.
OPINION
October 20, 2007
The war of words against Iran grew scorching this week when President Bush declared that "avoiding World War III" requires preventing that country from developing nuclear weapons. The Bush administration continues to insist that it seeks a diplomatic solution to the Iran crisis -- and the White House says the president didn't mean to lay out a case for war. Yet senior U.S.
OPINION
March 13, 2009
We can't say we weren't warned: In an annual assessment of major national security threats presented to the Senate Armed Services Committee on Tuesday, military intelligence chief Lt. Gen. Michael D. Maples revealed that Al Qaeda is strengthening its foothold in East Africa. Specifically, an Islamic terrorist group in Somalia, Al Shabab, has been releasing propaganda pointing out its shared ideology with Al Qaeda, suggesting, Maples said, that "a formal merger announcement is forthcoming."
NATIONAL
January 23, 2007 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Al Qaeda's Iraq-based faction considered trying to use student visas to get a dozen or more operatives into the United States to launch an attack, a ploy that was successful for one of the hijackers in the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, U.S. counter-terrorism officials confirmed Monday.
WORLD
August 22, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon has made contingency plans to send small teams of special operations troops into Syria if the White House decides it needs to secure chemical weapons depots now controlled by security forces loyal to President Bashar Assad, senior U.S. officials said. President Obama warned this week that any effort by Assad to move or use his arsenal of chemical munitions in the country's conflict would cross a "red line," implying it could prompt swift U.S. intervention.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
Iran has exploited the war in Iraq and a proxy fight with Israel to emerge as a more powerful and confident foe of the United States and is casting a growing "shadow" of influence across the Middle East, the nation's top intelligence official testified Thursday. During a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on national security threats, National Intelligence Director John D.
OPINION
May 4, 2008 | Leonard S. Spector and Avner Cohen, Leonard S. Spector directs the Washington office of the Monterey Institute's James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. Avner Cohen is a senior fellow at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington and the author of "Israel and the Bomb."
Last month's unclassified congressional briefing on Syria's clandestine nuclear reactor, which was destroyed by Israel on Sept. 6, 2007, was yet another reminder of the challenges confronting the U.S. intelligence community. Still smarting from its gross overestimation of Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, the community bent over backward to avoid overstating its case against Syria -- and in doing so, it stumbled badly.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2006 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The commander of U.S. forces in the Middle East said Wednesday that he had requested an increase in the number of U.S. military advisors in Iraq and had sent another 2,000-Marine unit into the country's restive western region, moves that will increase the number of American troops in Iraq. In two back-to-back hearings on Capitol Hill, Army Gen. John P. Abizaid, head of U.S.
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