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June 5, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael De Luca, who was fired from New Line Cinema in January after 16 years with that company, is joining DreamWorks Pictures as head of production. De Luca will oversee development and production of the company's movies as well as daily operations of the division, reporting directly to Walter Parkes, co-head of DreamWorks Pictures, and to principal Jeffrey Katzenberg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Earlier this week, Sony announced that it had acquired the rights to the story of Richard Phillips, the captain of the Maersk Alabama freighter that was captured by Somali pirates, prompting a tense showdown that resulted in Phillips' rescue by Navy SEALs on the high seas. The studio also purchased the film rights to Phillips' upcoming memoirs. The interesting angle, for those of us who follow the inside workings of Hollywood, is the lineup of producers attached to the project.
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BUSINESS
June 9, 2003 | Claudia Eller and Michael Cieply Times Staff Writers, Times Staff Writers
DreamWorks SKG set Hollywood abuzz in June 2001 with its surprise hire of Michael De Luca, a brash baby mogul who had made New Line Cinema a hot stop for cutting-edge fare such as "Austin Powers" and "Boogie Nights" during his 16-year run there. De Luca's mission as the company's new head of production: to help boost output to a dozen pictures a year, finally putting DreamWorks within reach of the major studios.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2003 | Claudia Eller and Michael Cieply Times Staff Writers, Times Staff Writers
DreamWorks SKG set Hollywood abuzz in June 2001 with its surprise hire of Michael De Luca, a brash baby mogul who had made New Line Cinema a hot stop for cutting-edge fare such as "Austin Powers" and "Boogie Nights" during his 16-year run there. De Luca's mission as the company's new head of production: to help boost output to a dozen pictures a year, finally putting DreamWorks within reach of the major studios.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Earlier this week, Sony announced that it had acquired the rights to the story of Richard Phillips, the captain of the Maersk Alabama freighter that was captured by Somali pirates, prompting a tense showdown that resulted in Phillips' rescue by Navy SEALs on the high seas. The studio also purchased the film rights to Phillips' upcoming memoirs. The interesting angle, for those of us who follow the inside workings of Hollywood, is the lineup of producers attached to the project.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
For much of last year, Amy Pascal was under fire. The co-chair of Sony Pictures Entertainment presided over two of last year's big-budget bombs, "After Earth" and "White House Down. " Her studio reported losses of $181 million for the summer months. Activist investor Daniel Loeb hammered Pascal's division, demanding an end to the "free passes" Sony studio executives got when their films disappointed and calling on parent company Sony Corp. to spin off part of its entertainment business.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2012 | By Susan King, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom.
Writer, producer and director J.J. Abrams ("Felicity," "Lost," "Alias")  will receive the 2012 Norman Lear Achievement in Television Award at the annual Producers Guild of America Awards on Jan. 26 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. "J.J. Abrams has produced some of the most iconic and highest-rated television shows of the past decade and longer-series that have changed the landscape of television," said PGA Awards chair Michael DeLuca in a statement Monday. Abrams, who has directed such films as "Star Trek," "Super 8" and the upcoming sequel to "Star Trek,"  is currently executive producer of CBS' "Person of Interest," Fox's "Fringe" and the new NBC series "Revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2004 | From a Times staff writer
Michael De Luca is out as production chief at DreamWorks SKG, the studio founded by Steven Spielberg, Jeffrey Katzenberg and David Geffen. He'll become a producer at Columbia Pictures in July, Amy Pascal, chairwoman of the Sony Pictures Entertainment's motion picture group, said Monday. During a 16-year run at New Line Cinema, De Luca became known for promoting such cutting-edge fare as "Austin Powers" and "Boogie Nights."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2008 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
The deal Warner Independent Pictures options Edward Ugel's "Money for Nothing," the true story of a hustler who preys on cash-starved lottery winners. He pockets the balance of their future winnings in return for lump-sum checks -- and then has a crisis of conscience. The players Michael De Luca Productions and Maguire Entertainment producing. Peter Steinfeld ("21") to write the screenplay; Ugel is represented by Farley Chase with the Waxman Literary Agency and on film rights by CAA. The book is published by HarperCollins.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1990 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
The producers of the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series, who caught some flak for having fun with a character who tortures and murders kids, have decided that young Freddy Krueger was himself . . . an abused child. That's the twist in New Line Cinema's "Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare," now being written, which will delve into Freddy's miserable childhood. "But we're not doing this to excuse Freddy for what he is.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael De Luca, who was fired from New Line Cinema in January after 16 years with that company, is joining DreamWorks Pictures as head of production. De Luca will oversee development and production of the company's movies as well as daily operations of the division, reporting directly to Walter Parkes, co-head of DreamWorks Pictures, and to principal Jeffrey Katzenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2002
In his article "Steam Cleaning" (May 14), Patrick Goldstein accepts without question the statement of Michael De Luca that today's young filmmakers are not interested in sexual subject matter, and the first two he names were the directors of "Boogie Nights" and "Spanking the Monkey." What planet does De Luca live on? He pointedly does not mention directors like Todd Solondz and Neil LaBute, who have created controversy over the sexual nature of their films. It is plain to me that today's young filmmakers are very much concerned with sexual matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Loyola High School in Los Angeles will showcase the work of young filmmakers from across the country via a student-run film festival, the first such event in the school's 149-year history, to be held May 17. Open to all U.S. high-school students, the Loyola Film Festival will feature three categories: narrative short, documentary short and action sports. Festival founder Adam Faze, a junior at Loyola, said in an email, "As the oldest high school in Southern California (and being in the entertainment capital of the world)
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