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Michael Delorenzo

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stars of Fox's "New York Undercover" were back on the beat Thursday, ending a contract holdout that briefly delayed production on the police drama. Actors Malik Yoba and Michael DeLorenzo didn't report to work on Monday to begin shooting the program's third season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than the cops are undercover on "New York Undercover" as the edgy Fox police drama enters its third season tonight. The behind-the-scenes conflict sparked by a brief strike last month by the series' two lead actors is still simmering beneath the surface. Michael DeLorenzo and Malik Yoba, who declined to show up for the season's first days of filming while demanding more money and creative input, remain bitter about the handling of their holdout by the show's executive producer, Dick Wolf.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"If people are going to walk out, that's OK," declared Jack Coleman. "People (who are offended) should walk out." The actor was referring to Bill Cain's "Stand-Up Tragedy," a harsh, fast-paced drama--set to a loud rap beat--about a tough boys' school on New York's Lower East Side. After a premiere last March at Taper, Too, "Stand-Up" opens Thursday at the Mark Taper Forum. It's staged by Ron Link, who has employed the same hard edge and visual/kinetic energy he brought to "Shakers" (1988)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stars of Fox's "New York Undercover" were back on the beat Thursday, ending a contract holdout that briefly delayed production on the police drama. Actors Malik Yoba and Michael DeLorenzo didn't report to work on Monday to begin shooting the program's third season.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1996 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than the cops are undercover on "New York Undercover" as the edgy Fox police drama enters its third season tonight. The behind-the-scenes conflict sparked by a brief strike last month by the series' two lead actors is still simmering beneath the surface. Michael DeLorenzo and Malik Yoba, who declined to show up for the season's first days of filming while demanding more money and creative input, remain bitter about the handling of their holdout by the show's executive producer, Dick Wolf.
NEWS
December 24, 1989
I'd like to compliment Michael DeLorenzo, who plays Alex Torres on "Head of the Class," for being a true sight to watch every Wednesday night. Up until now, I wasn't a devout fan of the series, but with the additional characters, I find the show very appealing. Reina Holt, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1996
Malik Yoba and Michael DeLorenzo, stars of the Fox series "New York Undercover," have received unfair criticism regarding their dispute over pay and working conditions ("Tensions Simmer 'Undercover,' " Aug. 29). Giving yearly pay increases and benefits to lead actors is an industry standard. The show's executive producer, Dick Wolf, conveniently ignored this rule by dismissing the actors demands as "a virus" in the entertainment industry. The police drama is currently in its third season.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | N.F. MENDOZA N.F. MENDOZA..BD: TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Math is fun" now seems like a timeworn adage. Certainly, many educational shows have tried to present math in something other than a dreaded light. Something alluded to, but not entirely tackled, is the significant fact that math has practical value. The KCET-produced "Count On Me" points out that by the time a child has completed the third grade, he or she already is turned off or on to mathematics for life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Coast Repertory, the Los Angeles Theatre Center and the Mark Taper Forum have bagged the largest number of nominations for the 21st annual Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle awards for 1989. South Coast Rep, the big winner for the last two years (for "Misalliance" in 1987 and "The Crucible" in 1988), again came out at the top of the list with 10 nominations for five productions this year, while LATC drew nine for six shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexandre Rockwell's "Somebody to Love" is a valentine to Rosie Perez, whose career includes numerous bigger and more prestigious pictures but who surely must cherish this modest and amusing little heart-tugger for the way in which it showcases her unique beauty, talent and personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"If people are going to walk out, that's OK," declared Jack Coleman. "People (who are offended) should walk out." The actor was referring to Bill Cain's "Stand-Up Tragedy," a harsh, fast-paced drama--set to a loud rap beat--about a tough boys' school on New York's Lower East Side. After a premiere last March at Taper, Too, "Stand-Up" opens Thursday at the Mark Taper Forum. It's staged by Ron Link, who has employed the same hard edge and visual/kinetic energy he brought to "Shakers" (1988)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1996 | SHAUNA SNOW
Pop music star Gloria Estefan, actor Edward James Olmos and the TV dramas "NYPD Blue" and "New York Undercover" were the top winners at the National Council of La Raza's 1996 Bravo Awards, held Saturday at the Wiltern Theater. Estefan received three awards.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fox on Monday announced programming moves that include a revamping of its Thursday night lineup, the premiere of a new comedy, "Ask Harriet," and the return of "New York Undercover." Those series will replace the veteran comedy "Living Single" and the freshman drama "413 Hope St.," both of which have struggled in the ratings this season. "Living Single," about four female friends living in New York City, will end its five-year run with two back-to-back episodes on Jan. 1, starting at 8 p.m.
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