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Michael Eagan

ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1998 | JOHN HENKEN
Handel's "Acis and Galatea" is not your usual shepherd-meets-nymph masque. Then again, these days it's just about the only one going. Multiple levels of retrospection opened Saturday and Sunday when the local period-instrument band Musica Angelica and soloists revisited that endlessly lyrical English baroque treatment of the classical Greco-Roman myth as the final concert of the summer's "Ancient Echoes" series outdoors at the Getty Museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2000
ANAHEIM 9:30pm Pop Music Traditional-country standard-bearer Randy Travis makes a rare small-theater stop in Anaheim to record an in-concert DVD. Last fall at the Hollywood Bowl he tried something ambitious with the backing of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Puritan and Colonial American literature and music add up to a stiff-necked affair, a raw imitation of sophisticated British models. But New World Baroque music by Mexican, Spanish and Peruvian composers needs no apology. It is glorious. Discovery after happy discovery of this rarely heard music, composed mostly in the 18th century, surfaced Sunday at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre in a program by the enterprising Los Angeles period group Musica Angelica.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1993 | LAURENCE VITTES
The J. Paul Getty Museum's five-event summer concert program, with "Music and Mythology" as its theme, opened for business Saturday night with only the fifth performance by A Musicall Dreame, lutenist Michael Eagan's new vocal quintet.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
In a triumph of scholarship and art, Musica Angelica presented the U.S. premiere of Nicola Porpora's 1737 oratorio "Il Gedeone" (Gideon) Friday in Zipper Concert Hall at the Colburn School of Performing Arts. The exciting work was conducted from the keyboard by Martin Haselbock, who discovered the manuscript in the Austrian National Library. Porpora is remembered -- by those who remember him at all -- as Handel's successful rival for the London opera audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Handel's most popular work during his lifetime was not "Messiah," but rather "Acis and Galatea," a masque derived from Ovid's "Metamorphoses" with a collaborative text by such luminaries as John Gay, Alexander Pope and John Hughes. Its Arcadian story of a shepherd's love for a nymph arousing the fatal jealously of a Cyclops seems pretty fanciful and remote from us today.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2000 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valentine's Day, coming on Monday, celebrates the best parts of love, when it is romantic, invigorating, intoxicating. But the Hallmark card writers, candy-box makers and florists tend to gloss over the fact that sometimes love is impossible, painful and depressing. You don't have to be romantically unattached to appreciate that fact, either. At least not this weekend.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1995 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music director Burton Karson invigorated the Coronadel Mar Baroque Music Festival last June by importing a Los Angeles-based period-instrument ensemble--Michael Eagan's Musica Angelica--as the core of his orchestra. Karson repeated this wise choice at the concert Sunday at St. Michael and All Angels Church, which opened the 15th season of these programs. The musicians played stylishly in ensemble and also provided most of the proficient soloists in the six-concerto program.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
History is no longer just history. On the one hand, history of, say, opera now includes the wide world, even its relationship with such matters as disease. Or history has itself as a subject: a narrative of historians' attitudes toward Leonardo or Hitler. And yet our musical presenters, be they at the Music Center, art museums or universities, seem downright incapable of making what one opera historian calls the "significant juxtapositions" between arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Western classical music has not always been clearly either fish or fowl. And its periods of transition have spawned some of its most intriguing creations. Four hundred years ago was such a time, as a prevailingly linear and modal style gradually gave way to a more vertically organized and tonally hierarchical music. Sunday evening Musica Angelica examined the "Birth of the Baroque," in the first of the four-concert Musical Portraiture series at the Getty Center this summer.
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