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Michael J Copps

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BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | Alex Pham
Two days before the nation's television stations switch off their analog signals, the acting chairman of the Federal Communications Commission visited Los Angeles to warn that too many Southern California residents still weren't ready for the change Friday to all-digital TV broadcasts. Michael J. Copps said he feared that as many as 20% of households in major U.S. cities still rely on over-the-air analog broadcasts.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For more than 10 years, Democratic Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps played the role of Howard Beale at the regulatory agency. Like the TV anchor from the movie "Network" — the role made famous by the late Oscar-winning actor Peter Finch — he was often mad as hell and not going to take it anymore. Copps, who is resigning from the FCC at the end of the month, has always been far more outspoken than the typical regulator. He was unafraid to offend the powerful companies he was charged to keep in line.
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BUSINESS
November 5, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
His dark suits. His wing-tipped shoes. The nearly four decades he's toiled in the nation's capital, including the last six years on the Federal Communications Commission. Everything about Michael J. Copps screams bureaucrat -- until he opens his mouth. Copps, a Democrat whose crusade against media consolidation has helped make him Hollywood's public-policy enemy No. 1, is more proselytizer than pencil pusher. The public airwaves, he says, are filled with "too much baloney passed off as news."
BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | Alex Pham
Two days before the nation's television stations switch off their analog signals, the acting chairman of the Federal Communications Commission visited Los Angeles to warn that too many Southern California residents still weren't ready for the change Friday to all-digital TV broadcasts. Michael J. Copps said he feared that as many as 20% of households in major U.S. cities still rely on over-the-air analog broadcasts.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2002 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Michael J. Copps doesn't exactly cut the figure of a political heavyweight. He's an old-school Democrat on a Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission. A former history professor, Copps is so soft-spoken that even admirers say he can come across as a little dull.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
For more than 10 years, Democratic Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps played the role of Howard Beale at the regulatory agency. Like the TV anchor from the movie "Network" — the role made famous by the late Oscar-winning actor Peter Finch — he was often mad as hell and not going to take it anymore. Copps, who is resigning from the FCC at the end of the month, has always been far more outspoken than the typical regulator. He was unafraid to offend the powerful companies he was charged to keep in line.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2002 | Edmund Sanders
Michael J. Copps, the Federal Communications Commission's sole Democrat, said he would hold hearings as early as January on concerns about the proposed relaxation of media ownership rules. FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell has questioned the usefulness of such a proceeding. The move, hailed by consumer groups and some Hollywood unions, increases the political pressure on Powell to convene a formal FCC hearing, rather than risk embarrassing Copps.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2007 | From Reuters
Tribune Co. will have to mount some persuasive arguments why regulators should allow real estate mogul Sam Zell to take the media company private, Federal Communications Commissioner Michael J. Copps said. "This is a multifaceted proceeding, so I am not going to prejudge it. I will look at it in terms of the world we live in," Copps said on the sidelines of the National Assn. of Broadcasters' annual conference.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2002 | Edmund Sanders
Bowing to political pressure, the Federal Communications Commission said it would convene a formal public hearing in February to gather input about proposals to relax long-standing media ownership rules that restrict who may own broadcasters and how large they can grow. Republican FCC Chairman Michael Powell had resisted calls for public hearings, fearing they would take too long and cost too much. But Powell relented after FCC Commissioner Michael J.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Responding to criticism over government videos packaged as TV news reports, federal regulators reminded broadcasters of rules requiring them to identify the source of such material. Tens of thousands of people have asked the Federal Communications Commission to investigate the failure of broadcasters to disclose the source of the government videos, Commissioner Michael J. Copps said.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
His dark suits. His wing-tipped shoes. The nearly four decades he's toiled in the nation's capital, including the last six years on the Federal Communications Commission. Everything about Michael J. Copps screams bureaucrat -- until he opens his mouth. Copps, a Democrat whose crusade against media consolidation has helped make him Hollywood's public-policy enemy No. 1, is more proselytizer than pencil pusher. The public airwaves, he says, are filled with "too much baloney passed off as news."
BUSINESS
December 16, 2002 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Michael J. Copps doesn't exactly cut the figure of a political heavyweight. He's an old-school Democrat on a Republican-controlled Federal Communications Commission. A former history professor, Copps is so soft-spoken that even admirers say he can come across as a little dull.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2002 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal regulators on Tuesday reversed themselves and said they would not impose a $7,000 indecency fine on a Colorado Springs radio station for airing a version of rap singer Eminem's "The Real Slim Shady." The surprise about-face clears KKMG-FM, a top-40 radio station, of charges that the station violated Federal Communications Commission rules barring stations from airing "obscene, indecent or profane language."
BUSINESS
April 9, 2009 | David Sarno
The Federal Communications Commission opened proceedings Wednesday to discuss the creation of a national broadband Internet system that will reach every American. The plan is due in Congress by Feb. 17. The FCC is looking for comments on ways to keep costs manageable, effectively monitor the deployment of new infrastructure and, more expansively, "use broadband to advance consumer welfare, civic participation, public safety" and a slew of other national issues.
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