Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMichael Jackson
IN THE NEWS

Michael Jackson

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Conrad Murray, the doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson, spent 699 days behind bars -- the longest possible amount of time, according to L.A. County sheriff's officials. A Los Angeles County Superior Court judge sentenced Murray in November 2011 to a maximum four-year term for his role in the pop star's death, lambasting the doctor for not only showing no remorse but for actively “blaming the victim.” Jackson died June 25, 2009, of an overdose of the anesthetic propofol, which the doctor administered.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
Conrad Murray, the doctor convicted in the death of Michael Jackson, was able to elude a group of hecklers after his release at 12:01 a.m. Monday, but that didn't stop them as his attorney addressed the media outside. "Do you guys mind?" asked Murray's attorney Valerie Wass, her voice rising as she turned to face the pop star's supporters. "This group of fans isn't respecting [Jackson's] legacy. " Her claim that Murray has a contingent of "loyal" patients garnered heckling from a cluster of fans who had hoped to give Murray a piece of their minds as he walked free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
As her client left jail under cover of darkness early Monday, the attorney for Conrad Murray -- the doctor convicted in the death of Michael Jackson -- said he did not receive special treatment. Murray served roughly two years of the  maximum four-year sentence he received for his involuntary-manslaughter conviction in 2011 f or his role in Jackson's death, which was caused by an overdose of the anesthetic propofol that the doctor had administered. Murray was able to evade reporters and Michael Jackson fans who were staked outside the jail by leaving through a nonpublic route that authorities declined to elaborate on. PHOTOS: AEG-Michael Jackson wrongful-death trial   Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department spokesman Steve Whitmore, who briefly addressed reporters, would only say that Murray was released to "representatives," and that such measures are allowed on a "case-by-case" basis to ensure certain inmates' safety and security.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Jill Cowan
They gathered in the darkness outside Men's Central Jail late Sunday, bonding over Michael Jackson tunes playing on an iPhone. Jackson's image on their shirts peeked out from under jackets as a chilly mist threatened to turn into rain. Their goal, one of them said, was singular: Welcome Conrad Murray to "his living hell. " "We were some of the last faces he saw going in," said Julia Thomas, 44, of Los Angeles. "And we're going to be the first faces coming out. " But Thomas never saw Murray, the doctor convicted of involuntary manslaughter in Jackson's death.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2013 | By Howard Blume, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Conrad Murray, the doctor convicted in 2011 of involuntary manslaughter in the death of pop star Michael Jackson, was released from prison early Monday, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Deputy Mark Pope said. Murray, 60, was sentenced to the maximum four-year term allowed for his role in the death of Jackson on June 25, 2009, from an overdose of the anesthetic propofol, which was administered by the doctor. Under state sentencing rules, Murray was eligible for parole well in advance of the end of his term, but he has nonetheless endured a long ordeal since Jackson's death, said his attorney Valerie Wass.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
“When your last name is Jackson, people naturally expect incredible talent.” That's how the release begins announcing the arrival of Tanay Jackson, daughter of Tito Jackson, on the music scene. What comes next is the typical bombastic overhype of one's talents in hopes of drumming up attention from the press. She's a “rockin' hot performer” in one sentence. A “smoking hot musical powerhouse” in another. And a “dynamo” elsewhere. Of course multiple mentions of being Michael's niece flood the release.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | David Lazarus
There is perhaps no better metaphor for the painful relationship between patients and our for-profit healthcare system than the fact that Anthem Blue Cross thinks you don't need anesthesia for a colonoscopy. It's not "medically necessary," the insurer says. Anyone who has experienced this most invasive of medical procedures might think otherwise. I spoke the other day with a fellow named Michael, who works locally in the TV industry but didn't want me using his full name because he's terrified that Anthem will retaliate by messing with his coverage (and it says a lot about our system that this is even a consideration)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
The Jimmy Kimmel/Kanye West feud reached its peaceful conclusion on Wednesday night with Kanye making an extended appearance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live. " And while many people thought the pair's feud was yet another media hoax, Kimmel swore it wasn't. And it's easy to believe him. No media stunt would have involved Kanye going on an extended, rambling rant on Kimmel's show. The great Kanye-Kimmel spat of 2013 began late last month after Kimmel aired a re-creation of one of Kanye's grandiose radio interviews with kids sitting in for Kanye and his interviewer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2013 | Sandy Banks
The verdict was delivered in the "Special Events Center" at the Los Angeles County courthouse, with dozens of people queuing up in the hallway as if they were there for a concert. The case itself had been mostly mundane; rooted in the details of contract and credentials, it dragged on for five months. But its finish was always destined to be a spectacle, because the man on trial was Michael Jackson, the King of Pop - never mind that the case was named "Katherine Jackson vs. AEG Live.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|