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Michael Jackson

ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Wednesday's verdict absolving concert promoter AEG Live of responsibility for Michael Jackson's untimely death in 2009 while preparing for what was to be a major career comeback raises the question of whether the spotlight will ever return to the superstar's musical legacy, one that yielded, among many other achievements, “Thriller,” the biggest selling album by a solo artist in history. Will Jackson's legacy be inextricably intertwined with the sad and often tawdry details of his personal life after his star went into decline, and the seemingly endless legal battles related to his death?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim, This post has been corrected. Please see below for details.
Jurors in the Michael Jackson wrongful-death case sided with AEG Live that the singer's death was a tragedy -- but not one for which the concert promoter was responsible. After three days of deliberations, the jury unanimously agreed that AEG Live hired the doctor, who gave the singer a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol. But they said Dr. Conrad Murray was competent and awarded no money to the pop star's family. "There are really no winners in this," jury foreman Gregg Barden said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
A Los Angeles jury on Wednesday found that concert promoter AEG Live was not liable for the death of Michael Jackson, capping a marathon civil trial that laid bare the troubled singer's health problems, struggles with drugs and fateful attempt at a comeback tour. The verdict came four years after Jackson received a fatal dose of an anesthetic from his doctor as he was about to launch a concert series produced by AEG aimed at reviving his stalled career. Jackson's family filed the lawsuit, claiming that AEG's was to blame for the King of Pop's death because it was negligent in the hiring and supervising of the doctor, Conrad Murray.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Victoria Kim, Ruben Vives and Jeff Gottlieb
For the dedicated Michael Jackson fans who came to the trial day after day, the singer still could do little wrong. They wore T-shirts expressing their love for the singer and their support for his aged mother. One fan even brought a bouquet of red roses to give Katherine Jackson and her attorneys. So when the judge announced Wednesday that jurors had decided AEG Live was not responsible for Jackson's death, they weren't just stunned, they were angry. They didn't understand how a five-month trial that seemed to expose the concert promoter as caring little about the singer's well-being could end this way. "My heart is broken," said Barbara de L'Orme, 42. "This was the greatest artist that we ever had, and they treated him like this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb, Ruben Vives, Victoria Kim
Entertainment giant AEG Live scored a major win in the Michael Jackson case after a Los Angeles jury unanimously decided that the concert promoter was not liable in the singer's death.   The jury -- which found that AEG hired Dr. Conrad Murray and that he was a competent doctor -- did not award any money to the singer's mother Katherine Jackson or his three children. They had been seeking damages of more than $1 billion. It took only three days for the jury to reach the verdict after a five-month trial that included dozens of witnesses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
In a final push before the case goes to jury, an attorney for Michael Jackson's family on Thursday said that entertainment powerhouse AEG cared little about the pop star's career and used him only to make money. In his two-hour-long rebuttal, Brian Panish told jurors that executives for the concert promoter gave misleading testimony during the nearly five-month trial and cared little about the truth. Panish conceded that Jackson bore some responsibility for his death from an overdose of the anesthetic propofol but that jurors should find AEG was 80% at fault and the singer 20%. Jackson died in June 2009 after he was given propofol in his rented Holmby Hills mansion by Dr. Conrad Murray while rehearsing for his 50 comeback concerts in London.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
After a trial that started in the spring, lasted through the summer and ended in the fall, one that entailed hundreds of exhibits and staggering legal bills, the Michael Jackson wrongful-death lawsuit finally went to the jury Thursday. What the case may come down to is whether jurors think that Jackson is to blame for his own demise by insisting on hiring the doctor who killed him, or that AEG Live executives were such poor witnesses that nothing they said can be believed. Jackson's mother and three children contend that AEG Live negligently hired and supervised Dr. Conrad Murray, the Las Vegas physician who gave the singer a fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to combat his severe insomnia.
NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By a Times Staff Writer
The second day of closing arguments in the Michael Jackson wrongful death trial began Wednesday with attorneys for AEG making their case. In closing arguments for the Jackson family Tuesday, attorney Brian Panish argued the entertainment firm should pay at least $290 million in damages to the pop singer's family. JACKSON TRIAL: Details, what's at stake Katherine Jackson and his three children have sued AEG, accusing the entertainment firm of negligently hired Conrad Murray, the doctor who gave Jackson the fatal dose of propofol as a sleep aide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Attorneys for AEG are set to give closing arguments Wednesday in the Michael Jackson wrongful death trial, and the case could be in the jury's hands by the end of the week. The singer's family has sued the entertainment firm, saying the company negligently hired and supervised Conrad Murray, the doctor who administered the dose of propofol that killed the singer. AEG maintains that Murray worked for Jackson and that any money the firm was supposed to pay the doctor was an advance to the singer.
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