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Michael Joyce

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NEWS
February 1, 1990 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spare Michael Joyce the lecture on the benefits of a college education. The teachers at St. Monica's High have already tried. Joyce, a junior, has decided he's not going to college. Probably never will. "I don't like school that much," he said, smiling. "I hate it. I get really bored." Lectures on the benefits of higher education might not inspire the 17-year-old from Beverly Hills, but the events of last weekend do.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2006 | Patricia Sullivan, The Washington Post
Michael S. Joyce, who as president of the Bradley Foundation played a central role in the rise of the conservative political agenda during the 1990s, died of liver disease Feb. 24 at a healthcare facility in Wisconsin. He was 63.
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SPORTS
September 18, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
TENNIS Mats Wilander and Karel Novacek both lost their matches by injury default at the Battle of the Beaches tennis tournament at the Palisades Tennis Club in Newport Beach. Wilander (foot) and Novacek (knee) both lost their first matches Wednesday. Jeff Tarango defeated Danie Visser, 7-6, 4-6, 7-6, and Michael Joyce defeated James Blake, 7-5, 6-1, Thursday. Play continues tonight with the semifinals Saturday and the final Sunday.
SPORTS
July 30, 2003 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Mark Philippoussis surfed for a week near his home in North San Diego County after returning from his appearance in the Wimbledon final earlier this month. On Tuesday, the 6-foot-4 Australian continued to ride his newfound wave of confidence and fitness, dispatching countryman Adam Kennedy, 6-3, 6-2, in a first-round match in the Mercedes-Benz Cup at the Los Angeles Tennis Center.
SPORTS
September 19, 1998
Michael Joyce defeated Chris Magyary, 6-2, 1-6, 7-6, in men's tennis at the Battle of the Beaches to advance to today's semifinals at Palisades Tennis Club. Joyce will face Ronald Agenor, who defeated Adam Peterson 6-2, 6-1 in the final day of round robin. Jeff Tarango will face Rikard Bergh in the other semifinal. Tarango defeated Tom Blake, 7-6, 7-6, and Bergh defeated Jim Pugh, 6-2, 6-4. Agenor, Bergh, Joyce and Tarango won all three of their pool- play matches to advance.
MAGAZINE
August 21, 1994 | NINA J. EASTON
WHERE THEY WRITE THE WALL STREET JOURNAL OPINION PAGES Conservatism's most influential voice. Hands down, no contest. THE NEW REPUBLIC Why preach to the converted when you can have the other side eavesdrop, too? THE WASHINGTON TIMES D.C.'s Moonie newspaper is the populist voice for conservatives. THE POLICY REVIEW The Heritage Foundation's earnest guide to William Bennett's "spiritual acedia" and Michael Joyce's "new citizenship." NATIONAL REVIEW Stodgy, but remains a standard-bearer.
SPORTS
July 25, 2001 | TIM CASEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Terminator provided motivation for Jan-Michael Gambill on Tuesday. Early in the first set of his 6-1, 6-3 victory over Michael Joyce, Gambill noticed one of his idols sitting among the crowd. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "There's a few people that would make me go like, 'Wow,' and he's one of them," said Gambill, who plays Paul Goldstein on Thursday. "Almost every guy in America looks up to him, you know. I was like, I better play like a man or he's gonna be [mad]."
SPORTS
July 30, 2003 | Gary Klein, Times Staff Writer
Mark Philippoussis surfed for a week near his home in North San Diego County after returning from his appearance in the Wimbledon final earlier this month. On Tuesday, the 6-foot-4 Australian continued to ride his newfound wave of confidence and fitness, dispatching countryman Adam Kennedy, 6-3, 6-2, in a first-round match in the Mercedes-Benz Cup at the Los Angeles Tennis Center.
SPORTS
July 1, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The glamour of the nomadic life of a professional tennis player wore off for Michael Joyce somewhere over Brazil, on one of the seven flights he had taken to play in Sao Luis, on an island in the northeast of the country. It wore especially thin when--as he faced a Brazilian player in the final--the Samba drums fans insistently pounded threatened to drive all thoughts from his head.
SPORTS
August 4, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Joyce has been operating as some sort of tennis vampire, using his fitness to drain opponents of their will to win and feasting on the victories to bolster his confidence. His 7-6 (7-4), 7-5 upset victory over third-seeded Jim Courier on Thursday night in the second round of the Infiniti Open was merely the latest in a line of attacks on top 20 players that has brought his ranking into the top 100 for the first time. The L.A. native, ranked No.
SPORTS
July 25, 2001 | TIM CASEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Terminator provided motivation for Jan-Michael Gambill on Tuesday. Early in the first set of his 6-1, 6-3 victory over Michael Joyce, Gambill noticed one of his idols sitting among the crowd. Arnold Schwarzenegger. "There's a few people that would make me go like, 'Wow,' and he's one of them," said Gambill, who plays Paul Goldstein on Thursday. "Almost every guy in America looks up to him, you know. I was like, I better play like a man or he's gonna be [mad]."
SPORTS
September 19, 1998
Michael Joyce defeated Chris Magyary, 6-2, 1-6, 7-6, in men's tennis at the Battle of the Beaches to advance to today's semifinals at Palisades Tennis Club. Joyce will face Ronald Agenor, who defeated Adam Peterson 6-2, 6-1 in the final day of round robin. Jeff Tarango will face Rikard Bergh in the other semifinal. Tarango defeated Tom Blake, 7-6, 7-6, and Bergh defeated Jim Pugh, 6-2, 6-4. Agenor, Bergh, Joyce and Tarango won all three of their pool- play matches to advance.
SPORTS
September 18, 1998 | From Staff and Wire Reports
TENNIS Mats Wilander and Karel Novacek both lost their matches by injury default at the Battle of the Beaches tennis tournament at the Palisades Tennis Club in Newport Beach. Wilander (foot) and Novacek (knee) both lost their first matches Wednesday. Jeff Tarango defeated Danie Visser, 7-6, 4-6, 7-6, and Michael Joyce defeated James Blake, 7-5, 6-1, Thursday. Play continues tonight with the semifinals Saturday and the final Sunday.
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
If Michael Joyce continues to play tennis as he did Wednesday in the second round of the Newsweek Champions Cup, his story may become one of riches to riches. Joyce, ranked No. 82 in the world, outfoxed the very foxy Jonas Bjorkman of Sweden, 6-3, 6-4, before the rains brought gridlock to the tournament at midafternoon. Bjorkman, ranked 49 points higher than Joyce at No. 33, is a Swedish Davis Cup player who routed Joyce the last time they played at last year's Lipton tournament.
SPORTS
August 4, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Joyce has been operating as some sort of tennis vampire, using his fitness to drain opponents of their will to win and feasting on the victories to bolster his confidence. His 7-6 (7-4), 7-5 upset victory over third-seeded Jim Courier on Thursday night in the second round of the Infiniti Open was merely the latest in a line of attacks on top 20 players that has brought his ranking into the top 100 for the first time. The L.A. native, ranked No.
SPORTS
July 1, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The glamour of the nomadic life of a professional tennis player wore off for Michael Joyce somewhere over Brazil, on one of the seven flights he had taken to play in Sao Luis, on an island in the northeast of the country. It wore especially thin when--as he faced a Brazilian player in the final--the Samba drums fans insistently pounded threatened to drive all thoughts from his head.
SPORTS
March 14, 1996 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
If Michael Joyce continues to play tennis as he did Wednesday in the second round of the Newsweek Champions Cup, his story may become one of riches to riches. Joyce, ranked No. 82 in the world, outfoxed the very foxy Jonas Bjorkman of Sweden, 6-3, 6-4, before the rains brought gridlock to the tournament at midafternoon. Bjorkman, ranked 49 points higher than Joyce at No. 33, is a Swedish Davis Cup player who routed Joyce the last time they played at last year's Lipton tournament.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2006 | Patricia Sullivan, The Washington Post
Michael S. Joyce, who as president of the Bradley Foundation played a central role in the rise of the conservative political agenda during the 1990s, died of liver disease Feb. 24 at a healthcare facility in Wisconsin. He was 63.
MAGAZINE
August 21, 1994 | NINA J. EASTON
WHERE THEY WRITE THE WALL STREET JOURNAL OPINION PAGES Conservatism's most influential voice. Hands down, no contest. THE NEW REPUBLIC Why preach to the converted when you can have the other side eavesdrop, too? THE WASHINGTON TIMES D.C.'s Moonie newspaper is the populist voice for conservatives. THE POLICY REVIEW The Heritage Foundation's earnest guide to William Bennett's "spiritual acedia" and Michael Joyce's "new citizenship." NATIONAL REVIEW Stodgy, but remains a standard-bearer.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spare Michael Joyce the lecture on the benefits of a college education. The teachers at St. Monica's High have already tried. Joyce, a junior, has decided he's not going to college. Probably never will. "I don't like school that much," he said, smiling. "I hate it. I get really bored." Lectures on the benefits of higher education might not inspire the 17-year-old from Beverly Hills, but the events of last weekend do.
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