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Michael Learned

ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
This is living? Premiering at 8:30 tonight on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42, ABC's "Living Dolls" is the last of the fall season's new comedies, and the least. If ever there was evidence of the creative cupboard being bare, this is it--a "Who's the Boss?" spinoff that imitates "The Facts of Life." Why don't they ever clone the good ones? "Living Dolls" was created by Ross Brown (a former writer and supervising producer on "The Facts of Life") and will regularly air at 8:30 p.m. Saturdays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1991 | RAY LOYND
On occasion, a motion picture-for-TV production company jumps on a true-life story with the alacrity of a news crew. It seems like only yesterday that a 23-year-old New Hampshire high-school teacher made headlines for manipulating her student lover into killing her husband. Tonight, CBS' "Murder in New Hampshire: The Pamela Smart Story" (at 9 p.m. on Channels 2 and 8) re-creates the seduction, lust and subsequent murder trial that resulted in a verdict six months ago to the day.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1987 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
The title of NBC's Sunday night movie, "Mercy or Murder?," refers to the question of motive put before the jury at the nationally publicized trial of 75-year-old Roswell Gilbert, who had admitted killing his wife of 51 years. There is no such ambiguity in the film itself, however: The jurors delivered their verdict; the film makers deliver another. Indeed, viewers who complain about TV movies that waffle on controversial subjects will be heartened at how decisively this one takes a stand.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The problem with most movie biographies of famous stars is that the wattage of the impersonators is rarely as bright as the originals. The exceptions--Barbra Streisand as Fanny Brice, for example, or James Cagney as George M. Cohan--only prove the rule. What's exciting about "Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story" (citywide) is that, in Jason Scott Lee, the movies have created a new star out of an old star.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO
Local residents' reaction was mixed Wednesday night to a proposal by Sherman Oaks Fashion Square to replace The Broadway store with Bloomingdale's. At the meeting, community activists and aides to City Councilman Michael Feuer learned from mall representatives of their plans to expand The Broadway store by 42,000 square feet to accommodate Bloomingdale's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1995 | NANCY CHURNIN
The Old Globe Theatre's shimmeringly lovely production of "Dancing at Lughnasa" offers a timely reminder of the quiet desperation of women in more limited times. The genteel poverty of the five hard-working Mundy sisters in 1936 Ballypeg, Ireland, is bluntly captured by Ralph Funicello's set--a poor, worn kitchen without walls, surrounded by the wilds of the fields outside. It suggests their absolute vulnerability to the vicissitudes of the outside world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON
If power is the ultimate aphrodisiac, why is Sidney Lumet's "Power" (selected theaters) the sexless diatribe that it is, all high-tech visuals and no emotional grounding? Its sole juiciness comes from Gene Hackman as a raffish Southern media consultant, well-cured in bourbon and branch water. The outlandish daring of his performance is almost rave-up enough to recommend the movie. Almost.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
With "Three Tall Women," a play first produced in Vienna in 1991, Edward Albee strides into the mature stage of an erratic career. And how better to show off accumulated wisdom and style than by focusing on the two big Ms--Mortality and Mother. It seems fair to speculate that Albee, now 67, has reached a point at which he can begin to understand the adoptive mother from whom he was estranged for most of his adult life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Crossing from one gender to another is such a dramatic journey that it's surprising there haven't been more plays on the subject. Jane Anderson's "Looking for Normal," getting its world premiere at the Geffen Playhouse, manages the task of covering one such journey with a light touch, yet without making fun of the protagonist or anyone else. It also offers a compassionate and convincing case that human ties can transcend gender.
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