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Michael Learned

ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1987 | LEE MARGULIES, Times Staff Writer
The title of NBC's Sunday night movie, "Mercy or Murder?," refers to the question of motive put before the jury at the nationally publicized trial of 75-year-old Roswell Gilbert, who had admitted killing his wife of 51 years. There is no such ambiguity in the film itself, however: The jurors delivered their verdict; the film makers deliver another. Indeed, viewers who complain about TV movies that waffle on controversial subjects will be heartened at how decisively this one takes a stand.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1997
1967-68: U.S. premiere of Eugene O'Neill's "More Stately Mansions," starring Ingrid Bergman, opens as first Center Theatre Group/Ahmanson production (the theater opened in April 1967 with L.A. Civic Light Opera's "Man of La Mancha"). The rest of the season includes new musicals hardly heard from since-- Kander & Ebb's "The Happy Time" and "Catch My Soul"--and the Royal Shakespeare Company in "As You Like It" and "The Taming of the Shrew." Elliot Martin is artistic director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1995 | KAY HWANGBO
Local residents' reaction was mixed Wednesday night to a proposal by Sherman Oaks Fashion Square to replace The Broadway store with Bloomingdale's. At the meeting, community activists and aides to City Councilman Michael Feuer learned from mall representatives of their plans to expand The Broadway store by 42,000 square feet to accommodate Bloomingdale's.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1995 | NANCY CHURNIN
The Old Globe Theatre's shimmeringly lovely production of "Dancing at Lughnasa" offers a timely reminder of the quiet desperation of women in more limited times. The genteel poverty of the five hard-working Mundy sisters in 1936 Ballypeg, Ireland, is bluntly captured by Ralph Funicello's set--a poor, worn kitchen without walls, surrounded by the wilds of the fields outside. It suggests their absolute vulnerability to the vicissitudes of the outside world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | SHEILA BENSON
If power is the ultimate aphrodisiac, why is Sidney Lumet's "Power" (selected theaters) the sexless diatribe that it is, all high-tech visuals and no emotional grounding? Its sole juiciness comes from Gene Hackman as a raffish Southern media consultant, well-cured in bourbon and branch water. The outlandish daring of his performance is almost rave-up enough to recommend the movie. Almost.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
With "Three Tall Women," a play first produced in Vienna in 1991, Edward Albee strides into the mature stage of an erratic career. And how better to show off accumulated wisdom and style than by focusing on the two big Ms--Mortality and Mother. It seems fair to speculate that Albee, now 67, has reached a point at which he can begin to understand the adoptive mother from whom he was estranged for most of his adult life.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Crossing from one gender to another is such a dramatic journey that it's surprising there haven't been more plays on the subject. Jane Anderson's "Looking for Normal," getting its world premiere at the Geffen Playhouse, manages the task of covering one such journey with a light touch, yet without making fun of the protagonist or anyone else. It also offers a compassionate and convincing case that human ties can transcend gender.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When Joe Orton saw Tom Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead" in 1967, he acknowledged in his diary that Stoppard's riff on "Hamlet" contained "a wonderful idea . . . how I wish I'd stumbled upon it." Orton imagined richly ironic possibilities, with Shakespeare's graduate students yakking away while the world goes to hell. Four months later, the most notorious English dramatist of the '60s was murdered by longtime companion Kenneth Halliwell.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | LIBBY SLATE, Libby Slate is a frequent contributor to Calendar and TV Times
Thomas Wolfe was wrong: You can go home again. OK, maybe not to your home. But most definitely, to the Waltons' home. On Sunday night, the familiar white house will fill once again with the clan who personified family values two decades before the phrase existed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
If Neil Simon and Anton Chekhov had a baby. . . . It sounds like the setup for a literary joke, and in a way that's what "The Good Doctor" was when it opened on Broadway in 1973. A collection of sketches--mostly comic--that Simon adapted from stories or other jottings by Chekhov, the finished product ended up looking a lot more like one parent--Simon--than the other. This impression hasn't changed over the years.
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