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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
There's something delightfully strange and counterintuitive about the way time operates in the opening chapters of Michael Lewis' new book, "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. " Lewis describes a new kind of Wall Street gold rush. In the entirely automated, pre- and post-crash stock market of the first two decades of the 21st century, human traders have become superfluous. Stocks are bought and sold inside computers, and a new brand of high-frequency trader is making a fortune thanks to a precious new commodity - speed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
There's something delightfully strange and counterintuitive about the way time operates in the opening chapters of Michael Lewis' new book, "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. " Lewis describes a new kind of Wall Street gold rush. In the entirely automated, pre- and post-crash stock market of the first two decades of the 21st century, human traders have become superfluous. Stocks are bought and sold inside computers, and a new brand of high-frequency trader is making a fortune thanks to a precious new commodity - speed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in New Orleans, writer Michael Lewis learned three lessons that stuck with him for life: Success and happiness are very different things. Never become a lawyer. You don't need to come from a bookish environment to know how to spin a helluva story. Maybe the storytelling part, Lewis speculates, stems from another thing New Orleans taught him. With its Creole-Cajun culture and hedonistic ethos, the Crescent City schooled him to view his native country like a skeptical foreigner trying to make sense of outlandish things that appear normal to the rest of America.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
BOOKS
October 8, 2006 | Steve Almond, Steve Almond is the author of several books, including the story collections "My Life in Heavy Metal" and "The Evil B.B. Chow."
OVER the last two decades, Michael Lewis has become an all-star at what the pros call immersion journalism. He is able to burrow into a cultural ecosystem, zero in on the most colorful characters available and use them to lay bare the intricacies of that world for us civilians. His bestsellers have demystified -- among other exotic precincts -- Wall Street ("Liar's Poker"), modern baseball ("Moneyball") and Silicon Valley ("The New New Thing").
NEWS
August 8, 2001 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Different people want to know different things when you tell them you're having lunch with Michael Lewis. Financial guys who read his "Liar's Poker" wonder whether he regrets becoming an ink-stained wretch when he could have remained a bond salesman and been filthy rich by now. MTV fans want to know what it's like being married to Tabitha "Rock the Vote" Soren.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | CAROLYN SEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This is a nonfiction volume about the varied misunderstandings and frayed nerves that afflict the business relationship between America and Japan. It's more than a pleasure to read; it's a laugh riot. Michael Lewis must have--at some point--totally ditched the notion that a journalist has to take all this seriously, or that something bad might happen if somebody's feelings get hurt.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | JOHN WILKES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the movie "City Slickers," a serene old cowboy tells an anxious 39-year-old advertising man that life doesn't take on meaning until a person finds "that one thing." Wisely, the old cowboy declines to say what that one thing is. Perhaps not so wisely, psychiatrist-author Michael Lewis thinks he knows what it is, and he's eager to share his insight. In "Shame: The Exposed Self" he offers not only a diagnosis of America's social ills, but also a prescription to cure them.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | CARA MIA DiMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Writing about the Internet is the literary equivalent of catching a shooting star in a split-second freeze frame. Understanding the Internet can only be as inconclusive. The Internet, that giant network of networks, is an instrument of our connectivity and our isolation, according to Michael Lewis in "Next: The Future Just Happened."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009 | Christopher Noxon, Noxon is the father of three and the author of "Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up."
Home Game An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood Michael Lewis W.W. Norton: 188 pp., $23.95 -- Pity the poor modern dad. Or at least Michael Lewis, bestselling author and father of three whose cranky and mostly clumsy attempts to live up to the current ideal of fatherhood are breezily and brutally described in the new memoir "Home Game."
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
NEWS
September 17, 2012 | By James Rainey
It was the advice of relatively junior aides and the memory of the U.S. standing idle during the Rwandan genocide of the 1990s that helped push President Obama toward the bombing of Moammar Kadafi's army, which staved off a potential slaughter in the undefended city of Benghazi, Libya, last year, according to a Vanity Fair article. The article by Michael Lewis portrays Obama as an introspective soul, who purportedly pays little heed to political ramifications in making the biggest decisions, finds wisdom outside the regular centers of power and focuses on some of his most important decisions by writing.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2011 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Growing up in New Orleans, writer Michael Lewis learned three lessons that stuck with him for life: Success and happiness are very different things. Never become a lawyer. You don't need to come from a bookish environment to know how to spin a helluva story. Maybe the storytelling part, Lewis speculates, stems from another thing New Orleans taught him. With its Creole-Cajun culture and hedonistic ethos, the Crescent City schooled him to view his native country like a skeptical foreigner trying to make sense of outlandish things that appear normal to the rest of America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2011 | By Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
Jennifer Egan's Pulitzer-winning novel "A Visit From the Goon Squad" and Michael Lewis' "The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine," which tells the story of savvy investors who foresaw the financial meltdown and cashed in on it, were among the winners Friday at the 31st annual Los Angeles Times Book Prizes. The awards to Egan in the fiction category and to Lewis in current interest were among a dozen handed out in a ceremony at The Times' Harry Chandler Auditorium, kicking off the Festival of Books this weekend at the University of Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2010 | By Irene Lacher
With "The Big Short" at No. 1 on the L.A. Times bestseller list and two No. 1 books on the New York Times' lists -- his tale of Wall Street's recent meltdown and "The Blind Side" -- Michael Lewis is certainly surfing the zeitgeist these days. In "The Big Short," he follows a tiny handful of savvy investors who saw the subprime mortgage crisis coming and placed bets on the coming collapse. As their detective work unfolds, Berkeley-based Lewis, 49, reveals how that market worked: Investment firms packaged high-risk loans into securities and persuaded the ratings agencies to give them a low-risk Triple A rating.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
I have to admit that when Michael DeLuca called me earlier this year, saying he was finally going to get "Moneyball" made into a movie, I figured he must've been smoking the proverbial Hollywood crack pipe. Anyone who loves baseball has read Michael Lewis' bestseller about how Oakland A's General Manager Billy Beane almost single-handedly upended the traditional way baseball evaluates athletic talent.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
NEWS
April 2, 1985
An Oakland man mistook a flight to "Auckland" for one to his hometown and added 12,000 miles to his journey from a holiday in West Germany, customs officials said Tuesday. Michael Lewis, 22, was at Los Angeles International Airport intending to fly to the Bay area city, 400 miles north, when Air New Zealand officials allowed him to board an aircraft bound for Auckland. Not until Tahiti was mentioned during an in-flight announcement did Lewis realize his predicament.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2009 | Christopher Noxon, Noxon is the father of three and the author of "Rejuvenile: Kickball, Cartoons, Cupcakes, and the Reinvention of the American Grown-Up."
Home Game An Accidental Guide to Fatherhood Michael Lewis W.W. Norton: 188 pp., $23.95 -- Pity the poor modern dad. Or at least Michael Lewis, bestselling author and father of three whose cranky and mostly clumsy attempts to live up to the current ideal of fatherhood are breezily and brutally described in the new memoir "Home Game."
BOOKS
October 8, 2006 | Steve Almond, Steve Almond is the author of several books, including the story collections "My Life in Heavy Metal" and "The Evil B.B. Chow."
OVER the last two decades, Michael Lewis has become an all-star at what the pros call immersion journalism. He is able to burrow into a cultural ecosystem, zero in on the most colorful characters available and use them to lay bare the intricacies of that world for us civilians. His bestsellers have demystified -- among other exotic precincts -- Wall Street ("Liar's Poker"), modern baseball ("Moneyball") and Silicon Valley ("The New New Thing").
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