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Michael Milken

BUSINESS
April 2, 1989 | BERNARD SALICK, BERNARD SALICK is chairman and chief executive of Beverly Hills-based Salick Health Care.
His name and photo seem to be in every newspaper and on every news broadcast these days. Yet for all the thousands of words spoken and written about Michael Milken, no one has succeeded in providing an accurate picture of the man he is; lamentably, few have bothered to try. I've known Mike Milken since 1982. Over the years, he has shown himself to me to be a forthright and honorable businessman and, no less important, a sensitive and compassionate human being. I am proud to call him my friend.
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BUSINESS
February 3, 2009 | Stuart Pfeifer and Tom Petruno
In the 16 years since his release from prison, disgraced junk-bond king Michael Milken has beaten prostate cancer, raised hundreds of millions of dollars for medical research and reshaped an image tarnished by a 1990 conviction for securities fraud. One thing he's been unable to do is win a presidential pardon, despite the support of some of the country's most influential people. Before he left office Jan.
NEWS
March 30, 1989
Michael Milken issued the following statement Wednesday: In America, an indictment marks the beginning of the legal process, not the end. After almost 2 1/2 years of leaks and distortions, I am now eager to present all the facts in an open and unbiased forum. I will plead not guilty to the charges and vigorously fight these accusations. I am confident that in the end I will be vindicated. I have requested a leave of absence from the firm in order to prepare for my defense.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
Employees at Drexel Burnham Lambert in Beverly Hills expressed every emotion but surprise at the news that Michael and Lowell Milken were indicted Wednesday on securities fraud charges. Most Drexel employees learned the details of the 98-count indictment by reading the Dow Jones ticker tape or by talking to colleagues, workers said. They said "Mike" had been in the office quite a bit in the past few days, but no one seemed to know how he got the news.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
Few men inspire such a range of descriptions as Michael Milken. And, indeed, few men have distinguished themselves in the wide range of activities as Milken has. "Junk bond" genius. Noted philanthropist. And now, key defendant in one of the most celebrated insider trading cases ever. To his detractors, Milken's junk bond operation at Drexel Burnham Lambert Inc. has been nothing short of a deadly threat to the entire American financial system.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Sure the recession hurt some of America's wealthiest people. But most just keep getting richer. Septuagenarian entertainment mogul John Werner Kluge is worth more than any other American for the third straight year. But thirtysomething computer whiz Bill Gates is closing the gap, Forbes magazine said in its 10th annual ranking of the richest.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
The pressure on "junk bond" king Michael Milken and some top aides increased Wednesday, but lower-level associates targeted in the securities fraud investigation may get some relief. Drexel Burnham Lambert's decision to plead guilty to federal criminal charges and pay a record $650-million fine means that the investment firm is also likely to cooperate with prosecutors in the ongoing investigation of Milken, head of its junk bond department in Beverly Hills, and some of his chief deputies.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN, Times Business Columnist
So Michael Milken, the fabled "junk bond" king of Drexel Burnham, is now formally charged with violating the securities laws. The smart money said it couldn't happen. When Ivan F. Boesky was charged with insider trading in November, 1986, a sophisticated New York executive swore that Milken wouldn't be involved. "Mike's too smart for that," the executive said. Well, however smart he was, the federal government Wednesday charged that Mike Milken was involved.
NEWS
March 30, 1989 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Michael Milken's defense strategy is likely to evolve in two directions in the coming weeks: convincing a federal court jury that some of his trusted former associates are liars out to save their own skin, and challenging some charges against him as technical rather than criminal. A key decision for the defense during the trial, which is likely to begin later this year, will probably be whether to put Milken on the stand to rebut the claims anticipated from convicted stock speculator Ivan F.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly four years of intensive investigation of Michael Milken, the pre-sentencing hearings that ended Thursday were to have been the prosecutors' moment in the sun. The hearings would at last give them an opportunity to show highlights of their investigation--to prove that the most massive securities fraud probe ever was worth the effort. They would show that Milken was guilty of many crimes beyond the six to which he pleaded guilty, that he was at least as big a crook as Ivan F.
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