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Michael Nash

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BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | AMY HARMON
New media: Two Time Warner subsidiaries, Home Box Office and Warner Music Group, have invested about $5 million to form a multimedia company called Inscape, to be headed by developer Michael Nash and based in West Los Angeles. The venture reflects the growing realization among big media companies looking to get into the interactive business that good talent is hard to find.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
For almost two years, the proceedings of the Los Angeles County Dependency Court - where thousands of cases involving foster children are heard annually - have been generally open to the press. That's a new arrangement in a system that has historically been much more restricted. It is the result of an order by Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Juvenile Court, who in early 2012 interpreted a statute that allows "interested parties" to attend these proceedings to include reporters. But now, an appellate court has tentatively concluded that Nash overstepped his authority.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Garrett Therolf
A California appeals court issued a tentative ruling indicating that it is prepared to overturn a Los Angeles County Superior Court decision to open juvenile dependency court hearings to the press. For years, advocates of greater transparency in the child welfare system have argued that public and press access to dependency courts would improve the public's sense of how that system works. In January, Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Los Angeles County Juvenile Court, issued an order decreeing that dependency hearings, which had been presumptively closed, were now to be presumptively open to the press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By Garrett Therolf
A California appeals court issued a tentative ruling indicating that it is prepared to overturn a Los Angeles County Superior Court decision to open juvenile dependency court hearings to the press. For years, advocates of greater transparency in the child welfare system have argued that public and press access to dependency courts would improve the public's sense of how that system works. In January, Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Los Angeles County Juvenile Court, issued an order decreeing that dependency hearings, which had been presumptively closed, were now to be presumptively open to the press.
OPINION
December 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
For almost two years, the proceedings of the Los Angeles County Dependency Court - where thousands of cases involving foster children are heard annually - have been generally open to the press. That's a new arrangement in a system that has historically been much more restricted. It is the result of an order by Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Juvenile Court, who in early 2012 interpreted a statute that allows "interested parties" to attend these proceedings to include reporters. But now, an appellate court has tentatively concluded that Nash overstepped his authority.
OPINION
March 19, 2012 | Jim Newton
We're in the second month of a vitally important experiment at the Los Angeles County Dependency Court, where court officers and others are wrestling with what it means to be watched. So far, so good: The public has gotten a look, not one child has been hurt, and awareness is slowly growing. Taking advantage of the order by Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Juvenile Court, I made another trip recently to the Monterey Park courthouse where Dependency Court is housed. Just a few months ago that would have been unthinkable, as dependency hearings - where the fates of children in the foster care system are decided - were closed except in unusual circumstances.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
There are many things that need to be done on a Saturday. Take the car in to be fixed. Watch the kid play soccer. And, if you live in Louisiana, go vote for who you want to become president. A sojourn at some polls here, though, indicated that many people had more important things to do on Saturday than vote. In a lush field next to a polling station, Michael Nash, 38, was watching his young son swing at a ball on a T-ball stand. He was planning to vote, sure, but he wanted to spend some time with his family first.
OPINION
November 10, 2011
Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has long lobbied for legislation that would allow the public greater access to the work of California's dependency courts, where the fates of children in foster care are decided. Twice, bills have been introduced in Sacramento to achieve that important objective, only to be stymied by well-meaning but misguided objections from child welfare advocates and self-interested protests from public employee groups whose members would face greater scrutiny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In an office on a Monterey Park hill, down the hall from colorful children's wall art and around the corner from a pint-size drinking fountain, Michael Nash holds court. As Los Angeles County's presiding juvenile judge, he works out of the Edmund D. Edelman Children's Court building, the first courthouse in the nation specifically designed to counter the intimidation that legal systems usually try to impose. In 1990, Nash became a judge in dependency court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988 | WILLIAM OVEREND, Times Staff Writer
The mandate from the community was to clean up the streets of Hollywood, and the job went to three of the toughest Municipal Court judges in Los Angeles. Elsewhere in the county, prostitutes and their customers rarely are sentenced to jail on a first offense. The usual penalty is a $150 fine. In Hollywood, however, the norm for first-time prostitute convictions became a five-day sentence and three days in jail for their customers. The judges--ex-cop Harold N.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | Jim Newton
Over the years, Judge Michael Nash, who supervises the Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has been tough and persistent. Bucking a long-standing tradition of secrecy, he opened courtrooms in Dependency Court, where the futures of young people in foster care are decided, and he waited out the uproar that ensued without wavering. He regularly confronts some of society's most dispiriting failures and yet he's remained a tireless - and generally upbeat - advocate for children. Last week, though, I found him in an uncharacteristically glum mood.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
There are many things that need to be done on a Saturday. Take the car in to be fixed. Watch the kid play soccer. And, if you live in Louisiana, go vote for who you want to become president. A sojourn at some polls here, though, indicated that many people had more important things to do on Saturday than vote. In a lush field next to a polling station, Michael Nash, 38, was watching his young son swing at a ball on a T-ball stand. He was planning to vote, sure, but he wanted to spend some time with his family first.
OPINION
March 19, 2012 | Jim Newton
We're in the second month of a vitally important experiment at the Los Angeles County Dependency Court, where court officers and others are wrestling with what it means to be watched. So far, so good: The public has gotten a look, not one child has been hurt, and awareness is slowly growing. Taking advantage of the order by Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Juvenile Court, I made another trip recently to the Monterey Park courthouse where Dependency Court is housed. Just a few months ago that would have been unthinkable, as dependency hearings - where the fates of children in the foster care system are decided - were closed except in unusual circumstances.
OPINION
February 12, 2012
Judge Michael Nash, who presides over the Los Angeles County Juvenile Court, has long argued that public access to the court's proceedings would improve its accountability and the accountability of those who appear before it. Last week, he set out to prove it. Nash, along with this page, had supported state legislation that would change the presumption that dependency court hearings, in which the fate of children in foster care is decided, should...
OPINION
November 10, 2011
Michael Nash, the presiding judge of Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has long lobbied for legislation that would allow the public greater access to the work of California's dependency courts, where the fates of children in foster care are decided. Twice, bills have been introduced in Sacramento to achieve that important objective, only to be stymied by well-meaning but misguided objections from child welfare advocates and self-interested protests from public employee groups whose members would face greater scrutiny.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 2006 | Douglas McGray, Douglas McGray is a contributing writer for West and a fellow at the New America Foundation.
Victor slouches into a bustling courtroom at Los Angeles County Children's Court. He would be tall, if he stood up straight, and broad, if his shoulders didn't follow his eyes to the floor. He doesn't look sullen or defiant. He just looks like a big kid, humble and out of place in this room full of busy grown-ups. When the judge glances up from her papers and smiles at him, he smiles back, just a bit. At 19, Victor has already lived a life that takes a few tellings to get straight.
OPINION
June 23, 2013 | Jim Newton
Over the years, Judge Michael Nash, who supervises the Los Angeles Juvenile Court, has been tough and persistent. Bucking a long-standing tradition of secrecy, he opened courtrooms in Dependency Court, where the futures of young people in foster care are decided, and he waited out the uproar that ensued without wavering. He regularly confronts some of society's most dispiriting failures and yet he's remained a tireless - and generally upbeat - advocate for children. Last week, though, I found him in an uncharacteristically glum mood.
MAGAZINE
June 4, 2006 | Douglas McGray, Douglas McGray is a contributing writer for West and a fellow at the New America Foundation.
Victor slouches into a bustling courtroom at Los Angeles County Children's Court. He would be tall, if he stood up straight, and broad, if his shoulders didn't follow his eyes to the floor. He doesn't look sullen or defiant. He just looks like a big kid, humble and out of place in this room full of busy grown-ups. When the judge glances up from her papers and smiles at him, he smiles back, just a bit. At 19, Victor has already lived a life that takes a few tellings to get straight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2005 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
In an office on a Monterey Park hill, down the hall from colorful children's wall art and around the corner from a pint-size drinking fountain, Michael Nash holds court. As Los Angeles County's presiding juvenile judge, he works out of the Edmund D. Edelman Children's Court building, the first courthouse in the nation specifically designed to counter the intimidation that legal systems usually try to impose. In 1990, Nash became a judge in dependency court.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | AMY HARMON
New media: Two Time Warner subsidiaries, Home Box Office and Warner Music Group, have invested about $5 million to form a multimedia company called Inscape, to be headed by developer Michael Nash and based in West Los Angeles. The venture reflects the growing realization among big media companies looking to get into the interactive business that good talent is hard to find.
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