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Michael Nathanson

NEWS
December 11, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN
The scene: Los Angeles premiere of Castle Rock Entertainment's and Columbia Pictures' Christmas biggie, "A Few Good Men" Wednesday night at Mann's Village Theater, followed by supper at the Century Plaza Hotel. In lieu of draggy speeches, the film's director, Rob Reiner, and his wife, Michele Singer, had directed a star-studded short feature on the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental advocacy group, which raised more than $150,000 from the benefit evening.
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NEWS
February 8, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Thursday's benefit premiere of Columbia's "Groundhog Day" at Westwood's Village theater. A reception followed. All concerned acknowledge this wasn't a lavish event. It was a low-budget affair and, in a way, appropriately so. This was to a full-blown premiere what Groundhog Day is to Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Man Who Knew Too Little" is too little, too late. At a time when the James Bond franchise struggles to keep au courant, a sendup of those Cold War spy capers of the '60s and '70s requires considerable imagination. Unfortunately, Bill Murray, Joanne Whalley, Peter Gallagher and Alfred Molina can't make a dent in this stale and hopelessly contrived comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Wall Street is not thrilled with the new fall television season. On Thursday, two prominent media analysts issued reports expressing concern about the new season. So far, few new shows have taken off and ratings have tumbled at ABC, CBS and Fox in the adults 18-49 demographic that advertisers covet. Both CBS and Fox are off by more than 20% while ABC is down 13%. NBC, which has struggled for years, is the only network to improve in that key demographic, thanks to its move of "The Voice" to the fall, the early success of the drama "Revolution" and new comedies "Go On" and "The New Normal.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2011 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
News Corp. has received the backing of a key British official, moving one step closer to taking control of British Sky Broadcasting. Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt said Thursday that he was inclined to accept News Corp.'s proposal to spin off Sky News into a separate company to address concerns about the editorial independence of the 24-hour news operation. A final favorable decision, pending a 15-day public comment period, would avoid a lengthy and costly regulatory review by Britain's Competition Commission, analysts said.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Nathanson, a former Columbia Pictures production executive who most recently headed Arnon Milchan's New Regency Productions, has been named president and chief operating officer of MGM Pictures. He replaces Mike Marcus, who resigned from the studio last week. Nathanson obtained early release from his New Regency contract in order to take the job. He had served as chairman and chief executive of the Warner Bros.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Thursday's world premiere of Castle Rock and Columbia's "In the Line of Fire," starring Clint Eastwood as a tenacious Secret Service agent. The screening was at Mann's Village in Westwood with a party afterward in the theater's lobby. Eastwood might have been in the line of fire, but he wasn't at the premiere; directing duties in Texas kept him away.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1996 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
For Arthur Hiller, being president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences means never having to say you're sorry. Or having anyone to personally thank on Oscar night. One could at least come to those conclusions in a week when (a) Hiller is reelected to a fourth term as academy president, and (b) Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1995 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Empire Records" is a soundtrack album in search of a movie. It's not so much a film as a series of random scenes connected by pop songs concerning a record store so hip that spontaneous dancing routinely breaks out in the aisles and so cool that the easiest way to get a job there is to come in and fire a few rounds from a gun.
BUSINESS
December 8, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Call it a cable squeeze play. Cable television networks may be the most lucrative divisions of many large media companies, but the networks are beginning to feel the pinch of dramatically higher programming costs. In 2006, TV sports giant ESPN spent $3.5 billion on programming for its flagship channel. This year, the channel's content costs have mushroomed to $5.2 billion — a nearly 50% jump from five years ago, according to consulting firm SNL Kagan. Programming expenses for Time Warner Inc.'s TNT channel have soared 55% since 2006 to $1.1 billion this year, propelled by sports rights fees for NBA and NCAA basketball as well as a lineup of original dramas including "The Closer" and "Falling Skies.
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