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Michael Pollan

April 27, 2004
"Still on Catastrophe's Edge" (Commentary, April 26) ended with the comment that "a clear road map for nuclear disarmament should be established." The road map is in Article VI of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. It calls for an end to the nuclear arms race, nuclear disarmament and general and complete disarmament "under strict and effective international control." President Kennedy presented the American-Soviet (McCloy-Zorin) program to achieve that goal in his address to the United Nations on Sept.
May 2, 2010
Fiction  1. The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson ($14.95)  2. The Girl Who Played With Fire by Stieg Larsson ($15.95)  3. Little Bee by Chris Cleave ($14)  4. Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann ($15)  5. The Battle of the Labyrinth by Rick Riordan ($7.99)  6. The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan ($7.99)  7. Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese ($15.
May 1, 2004
In "A Flood of U.S. Corn Rips at Mexico" (Commentary, April 23), Michael Pollan blames American farmers for destroying the viability of Mexico's corn industry. But the Mexican agriculture sector is thriving. The central premise of his article is wrong. The U.S. sells mostly yellow corn that goes into animal feed for Mexico's beef, pork and poultry production. Corn produced by Mexican farmers is mostly white corn for human consumption. The small amount of U.S.-produced white corn sold to Mexico for human consumption offsets production deficits due to unrealized production, droughts or other factors.
July 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
An article about opium poppies got Harper's magazine banned from a federal prison in Florida. The high-toned literary magazine's April cover story, "Opium, Made Easy," chronicles author Michael Pollan's passage from innocent gardener to potential felon last summer as he learned how easily opium could be made from poppies growing in his yard.
August 7, 2006
Re "How to keep 'em down on the farm," Opinion, Aug. 3 Jonah Goldberg is right in his description of the Welfare Kings who claim to be farmers, live in our major cities and collect payments from the federal government while not growing anything. Others grow crops that make economic sense only because of the subsidies. Also subsidized in the West is the water used to grow crops. The Welfare Kings are demanding a 44% increase over the next 25 years in the amount of water they want to take from the Central Valley Project at highly subsidized rates.
February 1, 2011
The Early Show (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Candace Cameron; Ricky Martin. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Matthew Perry; former Gov. Mitt Romney (R-Mass.); Brooke Burke. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Regis and Kelly Lisa Kudrow; Minka Kelly. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Former Gov. Mitt Romney (R-Mass.) with his wife, Ann. (N) 10 a.m. KABC The Doctors A 28-day road to health. (N) 11 a.m. KCAL The Talk Suzanne Somers. (N) 1 p.m. KCBS The Oprah Winfrey Show Vegan diet; where meat comes from; authors Michael Pollan and Kathy Freston.
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