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Michael R Lissack

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BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael R. Lissack, the Wall Street whistle-blower who encouraged Orange County not to repay $800 million in bonds and later offered his services as county executive, has landed in another controversy--this time in cyberspace.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael R. Lissack, the Wall Street whistle-blower who encouraged Orange County not to repay $800 million in bonds and later offered his services as county executive, has landed in another controversy--this time in cyberspace.
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BUSINESS
May 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smith Barney Seeks Damages From Former Executive: The nation's second-largest securities firm filed an arbitration counterclaim against Michael R. Lissack for $15 million, alleging that the municipal bond official spread false statements about Smith Barney Inc. after he was given a reduced bonus for 1994. Lissack filed a New York Stock Exchange arbitration claim against the firm in February, charging that it directed him to withhold information from federal regulators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1995 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael R. Lissack, a self-proclaimed Wall Street whistle-blower, on Friday offered to be Orange County's new chief executive officer and said the county should not pay back debt that voters didn't approve. Lissack, whose claims of widespread fraud and corruption in the bond industry made headlines earlier this year, has advised the bankrupt county to refuse to pay more than $800 million of outstanding bonds on grounds that the debt is unconstitutional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1995 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael R. Lissack, a self-proclaimed Wall Street whistle-blower, on Friday offered to be Orange County's new chief executive officer and said the county should not pay back debt that voters didn't approve. Lissack, whose claims of widespread fraud and corruption in the bond industry made headlines earlier this year, has advised the bankrupt county to refuse to pay more than $800 million of outstanding bonds on grounds that the debt is unconstitutional.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | SCOT J. PALTROW and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Smith Barney Inc. has launched an internal investigation into allegations by a former employee that the giant Wall Street brokerage deceived Los Angeles County in 1993, costing the county as much as $1.3 million by secretly taking a fee the firm had promised to forgo. Smith Barney has denied that it broke its agreement with the county in connection with a complicated $461-million transaction involving derivatives in October, 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1998 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investment banking firm Lazard Freres & Co. has agreed to pay $9 million in damages plus attorneys' fees to settle a long-running legal fight over allegations that it overcharged the Metropolitan Transportation Authority for investments in U.S. Treasury securities, sources said Thursday. The MTA Board of Directors will meet in closed session Monday to consider whether to accept the settlement with Lazard Freres, which served as the agency's financial advisor from 1991 to 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of indecision, the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority announced Tuesday that it is taking legal action against Wall Street investment bank Lazard Freres & Co. for allegedly overcharging the agency by millions of dollars on U.S. Treasury securities. But because the MTA did not act until after a private whistle-blower filed suit, the county may miss out on a good chunk of any possible damage awards.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA and SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Securities and Exchange Commission has opened a formal investigation into allegations that the giant Wall Street brokerage firm Smith Barney duped Los Angeles County on a complicated 1993 bond deal and may have cost the county as much as $1.3 million, county officials confirmed Thursday.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Smith Barney Seeks Damages From Former Executive: The nation's second-largest securities firm filed an arbitration counterclaim against Michael R. Lissack for $15 million, alleging that the municipal bond official spread false statements about Smith Barney Inc. after he was given a reduced bonus for 1994. Lissack filed a New York Stock Exchange arbitration claim against the firm in February, charging that it directed him to withhold information from federal regulators.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1995 | SCOT J. PALTROW and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Smith Barney Inc. has launched an internal investigation into allegations by a former employee that the giant Wall Street brokerage deceived Los Angeles County in 1993, costing the county as much as $1.3 million by secretly taking a fee the firm had promised to forgo. Smith Barney has denied that it broke its agreement with the county in connection with a complicated $461-million transaction involving derivatives in October, 1993.
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