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Michael Randall

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like all good Cub Scouts, William and Michael Randall promised to do their best to help other people, honor their country and obey the Law of the Pack. But when it came to pledging a "duty to God," the twin 10-year-olds from Anaheim Hills refused. "I don't think he's real," Michael said. "Nobody has his signature, nobody has any clothes that he wore, nobody knows if he's dead or something. I just think that he's a fairy tale." Said William: "My brother took the words right out of my mouth."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1998 | BENJAMIN J. HUBBARD
The profound question of the nature of religious belief or unbelief has surfaced in the case of the Randall twins of Anaheim Hills, who were denied Eagle Scout awards when they refused to affirm God's existence. The California Supreme Court has settled the strictly legal question in the case of Michael and William Randall by declaring that the Boy Scouts of America is a "social organization," not a business.
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NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twin brothers, self-described as the "two of the best examples of Scouts on the face of the Earth," responded tearfully Monday to the California Supreme Court ruling that the Boy Scouts could expel them because they refused to affirm the existence of God in the organization's oath. Michael and William Randall, 16, said they were proud of their actions and only wished the Scouts had shown as much "integrity and character" as the twins have.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | Associated Press
Twin 10-year-old boys ousted from the Cub Scouts for refusing to say God in the Scout oath can return to their pack, a judge reaffirmed Monday. Superior Court Judge Richard Frazee ruled that local Boy Scout officials cannot bar William and Michael Randall from the organization because it is a business under state law and therefore cannot exclude people because of their religious beliefs. Frazee had ruled in favor of the youngsters on May 7, so Monday's formal order was not a surprise.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Twin brothers, self-described as the "two of the best examples of Scouts on the face of the Earth," responded tearfully Monday to the California Supreme Court ruling that the Boy Scouts could expel them because they refused to affirm the existence of God in the organization's oath. Michael and William Randall, 16, said they were proud of their actions and only wished the Scouts had shown as much "integrity and character" as the twins have.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | SONNI EFRON
The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California said Thursday that it will represent 9-year-old twins who claim that they were expelled from their Anaheim Cub Scout pack for refusing to say the word God in the Scouts' Oath. ACLU senior staff counsel Jon W. Davidson said the Boy Scouts of America are "in the public eye as a symbol of America," receive public funds, often meet in public schools and should not be permitted to discriminate on religious grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991
As a minister and a longtime Scout and Scoutmaster, I say hurrah for Cub Scouts William and Michael Randall and their suit. Anyone who thinks that anybody's God is omnipresent at scouting events has not been around scouting very long. The proper focus of scouting is moral and physical development in a healthy outdoor environment. Having adults judge the theological opinions of 9-year-olds only serves to demonstrate that adults have silly ideas. The very word God is but a symbol for an ultimate reality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America lost a bid Thursday to keep two Anaheim Hill boys out of the organization because they do not believe in God, attorneys said. The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to hear a petition by the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America. That development, in effect, allows twins William and Michael Randall to participate in Scouting while the Boy Scouts pursue an appeal of Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.'s May ruling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1991 | MATT LAIT
Unexpected legal maneuvers Monday delayed the start of a trial between the Boy Scouts of America and twin Anaheim Hills brothers who have been excluded from the organization because they refuse to swear an oath to God. The non-jury trial, which was scheduled to begin Monday, was postponed until Wednesday by Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr. because of last-minute pretrial motions filed by both sides.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America is a "social organization," not a business, and enjoys broad authority to ban agnostics and gays, the California Supreme Court ruled in two cases Monday. The long-anticipated decisions put an end to nearly two decades of court battles in California over whether the state's civil rights law restricts the Scouts' ability to bar certain groups.
NEWS
March 24, 1998 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America is a "social organization," not a business, and enjoys broad authority to ban agnostics and gays, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday in cases brought by twins from Anaheim Hills and a former Eagle Scout from Berkeley. The long-anticipated decisions put an end to nearly two decades of court battles in California over whether the state's civil rights law restricts the Scouts' ability to bar certain groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of Orange County twins who say they have spent the good part of their young lives fulfilling the Boy Scout credo, except duty to God, were described by their father as "120 miles high" Monday after nearing their dream of becoming Eagle Scouts. The legal battle over Michael and William Randall's future in the Scouts has raged for seven years because of their refusal to adhere to the organization's commitment to God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1998 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local Scouting officials on Sunday recommended that a set of Anaheim Hills twins who have refused to recite the religious portion of the Scout's oath be awarded the group's highest rank. The six-member panel, which included three members from the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America, voted unanimously to grant Eagle Scout badges to 16-year-old Michael and William Randall. The local chapter was ordered last month by Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1995 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative Orange County politicians have filed a brief with the state's highest court, saying government has no business getting involved in a local Boy Scout Council's battle to exclude twins who refused to acknowledge a belief in God.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An appellate court justice on Tuesday denounced as "silliness" a legal dispute involving Anaheim Hills twins who refuse to take an oath to God as required by the Orange County Boy Scouts. Attorneys on both sides of the controversy surrounding Scouts William and Michael Randall, now 12, say the case involves constitutional issues of freedom of speech, association and religion that are at the heart of Scouting.
NEWS
May 8, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County judge's ruling Thursday that two Anaheim Hills brothers who do not believe in God must be allowed back into Scouting was the first major membership challenge the Boy Scouts of America has lost in court. Other plaintiffs, from atheists to homosexuals to females, have fought the organization's membership requirements before, but none has been as successful as the William and Michael Randall. Key in their victory was Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1991 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another legal blow for twin Anaheim Hills Cub Scouts, an appeals court Thursday issued a ruling upholding, at least for now, the Boy Scouts' right to keep the 9-year-old brothers out of the organization because they refuse to swear an oath to God. The 2-1 decision by the 4th District Court of Appeal extends its earlier suspension of a lower court's preliminary injunction until a hearing on the matter can be held.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1992 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Boy Scouts of America lost a bid Thursday to keep two Anaheim Hill boys out of the organization because they do not believe in God, attorneys said. The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to hear a petition by the Orange County Council of the Boy Scouts of America. That development, in effect, allows twins William and Michael Randall to participate in Scouting while the Boy Scouts pursue an appeal of Orange County Superior Court Judge Richard O. Frazee Sr.'s May ruling.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | Associated Press
Twin 10-year-old boys ousted from the Cub Scouts for refusing to say God in the Scout oath can return to their pack, a judge reaffirmed Monday. Superior Court Judge Richard Frazee ruled that local Boy Scout officials cannot bar William and Michael Randall from the organization because it is a business under state law and therefore cannot exclude people because of their religious beliefs. Frazee had ruled in favor of the youngsters on May 7, so Monday's formal order was not a surprise.
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