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NEWS
October 28, 1987
The chief investigator for the office of the Cook County, Ill., court clerk was sentenced to seven years in prison after pleading guilty to charges resulting from the FBI's Operation Incubator corruption probe. The investigator, Michael Lambesis, was also ordered to pay $35,000 in restitution and placed on five years' probation after his prison term. Lambesis pleaded guilty Aug.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Terriers," which begins Wednesday on FX, is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego. In a fall season overly populated with cops and criminals, there may be more stylish or quirky or elaborately premised series coming your way, straining to cut an edge or push an envelope. But "Terriers," whose virtues are more traditional, is to my taste easily the best of them, and one of the brightest lights in the whole freshman class.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County prosecutor told a jury Tuesday that Michael Raymond Johnson gunned down a sheriff's deputy last year to avoid being sent back to prison, and delivered a final execution-style shot to the fallen deputy before turning his gun on another officer. "The reason we are here is because on July 17, 1996, that man," bellowed Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Ventura County prosecutor told a jury Tuesday that Michael Raymond Johnson gunned down a sheriff's deputy last year to avoid being sent back to prison, and delivered a final execution-style shot to the fallen deputy before turning his gun on another officer. "The reason we are here is because on July 17, 1996, that man," bellowed Deputy Dist. Atty.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2010 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"Terriers," which begins Wednesday on FX, is a wonderfully well-conceived, well-made and well-played series about a pair of soft-boiled downmarket private detectives in over their heads in San Diego. In a fall season overly populated with cops and criminals, there may be more stylish or quirky or elaborately premised series coming your way, straining to cut an edge or push an envelope. But "Terriers," whose virtues are more traditional, is to my taste easily the best of them, and one of the brightest lights in the whole freshman class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Raymond Johnson refused to discuss the shooting of Deputy Peter Aguirre Jr. and asked for a lawyer, but prosecutors kept trying to get a statement out of him as he lay wounded in Ventura County Medical Center, a prosecution psychiatrist testified Tuesday. Dr. Donald S. Patterson testified that top prosecutors told him Johnson had waived his Miranda rights after the July 17, 1996, shooting of Aguirre, and that Johnson wanted to talk to a psychiatrist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for accused killer Michael Raymond Johnson argued Monday that the one-time drug counselor should not face the death penalty for fatally shooting a sheriff's deputy in July, because a delusional jealousy dictated his homicidal behavior. "This is not a capital case," Deputy Public Defender Todd Howeth maintained in an opening statement at Johnson's preliminary hearing. "The shooting was a direct result of Mr. Johnson's mental illness."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987
Motorcyclist Dies in Crash: A Santa Ana man died early Friday morning when he lost control of his speeding motorcycle and crashed into a guardrail, police said. Michael Raymond Ormsby, 27, was traveling east on Chapman Avenue about 1:45 a.m. when he ran off the road at the Santa Ana Freeway underpass, said Bob Gustafson, a police spokesman. Ormsby, who was not wearing a helmet, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | Greg Risling, (949) 574-4226
A convicted sex offender living near Lincoln Elementary School who caused concern among teachers, parents and students has moved out of the area, police said. Jay Michael Raymond, 46, on Monday notified police he had packed his bags over the weekend and relocated to Murietta Hot Springs in Riverside County, where he had once lived. Raymond informed police last week of his intention to leave Newport Beach.
NEWS
March 12, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
A Ventura County jury called for a death sentence Wednesday for a man convicted of fatally shooting a sheriff's deputy. Michael Raymond Johnson, 50, sat stoically as the weeping jurors were polled after five days of deliberations. Defense attorneys have said that he is mentally ill. In January, the same jury deliberated one day before convicting Johnson of first-degree murder for shooting Sheriff's Deputy Peter J. Aguirre in July 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1997 | MACK REED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Raymond Johnson refused to discuss the shooting of Deputy Peter Aguirre Jr. and asked for a lawyer, but prosecutors kept trying to get a statement out of him as he lay wounded in Ventura County Medical Center, a prosecution psychiatrist testified Tuesday. Dr. Donald S. Patterson testified that top prosecutors told him Johnson had waived his Miranda rights after the July 17, 1996, shooting of Aguirre, and that Johnson wanted to talk to a psychiatrist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1996 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for accused killer Michael Raymond Johnson argued Monday that the one-time drug counselor should not face the death penalty for fatally shooting a sheriff's deputy in July, because a delusional jealousy dictated his homicidal behavior. "This is not a capital case," Deputy Public Defender Todd Howeth maintained in an opening statement at Johnson's preliminary hearing. "The shooting was a direct result of Mr. Johnson's mental illness."
NEWS
October 28, 1987
The chief investigator for the office of the Cook County, Ill., court clerk was sentenced to seven years in prison after pleading guilty to charges resulting from the FBI's Operation Incubator corruption probe. The investigator, Michael Lambesis, was also ordered to pay $35,000 in restitution and placed on five years' probation after his prison term. Lambesis pleaded guilty Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1998 | TINA DIRMANN
Two men and a 17-year-old boy were arrested Wednesday morning on suspicion of beating and robbing a Ventura man, police said. Authorities said Terrance Reilly was walking along Harbor Boulevard and Ash Street on the pedestrian footbridge about 3 a.m. when he was confronted by two men and a teenager, also from Ventura, who demanded his wallet. Reilly tried to walk away but was punched in the back of the head and fell to the ground, police said. He was then punched and kicked, police said.
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