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Michael S Carona

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Wednesday set June 10, 2008, for the trial of indicted Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona, his wife, Deborah, and his former mistress, Debra V. Hoffman. The Caronas were also cleared to contact two people considered potential witnesses against them, including their tax preparer. U.S. District Judge Andrew J. Guilford called the June date firm unless new charges were filed against the defendants or others were charged. Assistant U.S. Atty. Brett A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2013 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
Orange County's former sheriff is waging a battle to be released from federal prison, where he is serving time for witness tampering in a corruption case that exposed wrongdoing in the state's second-largest sheriff's department. On Monday, a federal judge heard arguments on whether to resentence Michael S. Carona, once a rising political star before he was indicted in late 2007 in a sprawling corruption case. Carona's attorneys argued that the 66-month sentence handed down by U.S. District Judge Andrew Guilford on the one witness-tampering charge on which he was convicted should be adjusted based on changes in the law. About one year after Carona's sentencing, the Supreme Court narrowed a definition of corruption to just bribes and kickbacks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona intends to return to work Monday, ending a 60-day paid leave of absence initiated after he was charged with corruption in a federal grand jury indictment. It remained unclear how much time Carona would spend in the sheriff's Santa Ana headquarters when he returns to work. In a statement, the department said Undersheriff Jo Ann Galisky would continue to handle day-to-day operations after Carona's return.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A federal appeals court Thursday upheld the witness-tampering conviction of former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona, but it remained unclear when he might have to begin serving his 5 1/2-year prison sentence. Carona has been free pending the ruling by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. Lawyers for the former sheriff acquitted of five other corruption counts had argued that jurors shouldn't have heard a secretly taped conversation in which Carona urged a colleague to lie to a grand jury on his behalf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An endorsement of Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona by the county Republican Party will stand, a judge ruled Monday. Orange County Superior Court Judge John M. Watson denied arguments by GOP committee member Tim Whitacre that the endorsement should be voided because of procedural errors. Whitacre is campaign spokesman for a rival sheriff's candidate, Lt. William Hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona has been appointed to a senior advisory committee for President Bush's Department of Homeland Security. Carona will serve on the department's Emergency Services, Law Enforcement and Public Health and Hospitals committee, chief advisor Tom Ridge said Tuesday. Carona, who is also the county's emergency manager, will be one of 14 members representing the nation's emergency preparedness community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
A judge will consider Monday whether to overturn the endorsement of Sheriff Michael S. Carona by the Orange County Republican central committee. Tim Whitacre, a committee member backing Carona rival William Hunt for the June 6 election, sued the committee over the April endorsement, saying it violated party bylaws because candidates must be present for an endorsement vote and Carona wasn't. Superior Court Judge John Watson will hear the suit. William R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998
County Marshal Michael S. Carona is way ahead in fund-raising against his only announced challenger in the June election for sheriff, compiling $174,755 in contributions, compared to $16,782 by Santa Ana Police Chief Paul M. Walters, according to campaign finance reports. Carona began raising money more than a year ago, anticipating a face-off with Sheriff Brad Gates. But Gates announced in October that he wouldn't seek reelection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1998 | VALERIE BURGHER
Supporters of Orange County sheriff candidate Michael S. Carona have sued the deputies union and other police groups, alleging they have made illegal contributions to Carona's rival, Paul M. Walters. A group called Sheriff's Deputies for Mike Carona alleged in the suit, filed Monday in Orange County Superior Court, that the Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2005 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona has begun dissolving his private foundation for underprivileged children and plans to transfer the funds to the United Way of Orange County under a deal being negotiated by the two charities, officials said Tuesday. The Mike Carona Foundation was created shortly after Carona was elected to his first term in 1998 with a mission to help curb delinquency among California's disadvantaged youths through educational and social programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2010 | By Paloma Esquivel
Former Orange County Assistant Sheriff Don Haidl was sentenced Monday to two years' probation, a $40,000 fine and 200 hours of community service for tax fraud. Haidl, a Newport Beach businessman and onetime assistant to convicted former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona, was accused of tax fraud in a scheme to help pay his son's legal bills in a sexual assault case. He was given probation rather than prison time because of his cooperation in the federal corruption case against Carona.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2009 | Tami Abdollah
A onetime assistant sheriff and trusted aide of convicted former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona was sentenced Monday to 27 months in prison for scheming to defraud the public of honest services and filing a false tax return. In a voice husky with emotion, George Jaramillo apologized to the court and said, "I am here to say that I am profoundly sorry for what I have done. While I did not set out to commit crimes, my cavalier and irresponsible mode . . . was criminal." Carona appointed Jaramillo as assistant sheriff in 1999 and fired him in March 2004, after rumors spread that a federal investigation of the Sheriff's Department was underway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2008 | Christine Hanley
For all its lurid tales and allegations of unchecked greed, the corruption trial of "America's sheriff" fizzled to a close Friday. Michael S. Carona, the highest-ranking law enforcement official to be prosecuted in Orange County, has steadfastly denied charges that he sold the powers of his office for cash and gifts, hawked badges for campaign donations and even took advantage of a deputy's widow by steering her to an attorney friend in a kickback scheme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
A retired assistant sheriff testified Thursday that he did not recall the department releasing a drunk-driving defendant from jail at the request of Newport Beach millionaire Don Haidl, a key government witness who made the allegation in the corruption trial of former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona. Kim Markuson was one of five witnesses called by attorneys Brian A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
As the prosecution drew to a close Wednesday in the federal corruption trial of former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona, defense attorneys acknowledged they were scrambling to line up witnesses. The government's final witness, an FBI agent, took the stand minutes before court adjourned and will be back this morning as prosecutors wrap up nearly seven weeks of testimony. At day's end Wednesday, Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer
On the witness stand, George Jaramillo has been described as everything from a pickpocket to Satan, a one-time cop with a law degree who appeared thoroughly corrupted by sex, money and power. The former assistant sheriff of Orange County also was expected to be a star government witness at the trial of his former boss Michael S. Carona, who was the county's three-term sheriff until his indictment last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1999
At separate ceremonies Monday, Orange County's new top law-enforcement officers were sworn in, both pledging to help poor and underprivileged youth. Incoming Sheriff Michael S. Carona, speaking at his swearing-in ceremony at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, urged residents to donate their time and money to needy children. If they do not, he said, the same children will grow up to occupy jail beds purchased at taxpayers' expense. Meanwhile, new Orange County Dist. Atty. Anthony J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1999
Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona said Thursday that a proposed initiative aimed mainly at killing the planned airport at El Toro Marine Corps Air Station is forcing him to step up plans to enlarge a County Jail facility in Lake Forest. Carona said he has no choice but to move ahead on a project to expand the James A. Musick Jail from 1,100 to 7,584 beds because passage of the initiative would make approving any new jail sites practically impossible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
A fiery political watchdog in Orange County testified Wednesday that she schooled former Sheriff Michael S. Carona on campaign finance laws during his first run for office and warned him to look out for laundered contributions aimed at circumventing the local donor limit of $1,000. Shirley Grindle, a former aeronautics engineer who has devoted her retirement to enforcing county campaign rules, said she sat down with Carona in her living room in Orange on Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
A Newport Beach millionaire stepped delicately around questions Friday about whether he had illegally reimbursed political contributions to elected officials other than the donations he testified he had laundered during the first campaign of former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona. Don Haidl was asked specifically about reimbursements to the campaigns of former Los Angeles Mayor and City Atty. James K.
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