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Michael S Carona

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona's request to file a secret motion to move his corruption trial out of Southern California violates the 1st Amendment's free-press protection, a media attorney argued Thursday. Carona's attorneys have asked U.S. District Judge Andrew J. Guilford to keep their motion to move the trial sealed because releasing it would create additional inflammatory publicity about the case.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2008 | Christine Hanley, Hanley is a Times staff writer.
Former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona has lost his bid to have a prosecutor removed from his corruption case because of the prosecutor's role in the wiretapping of a government informant. Carona's attorneys had argued that Assistant U.S. Atty. Brett Sagel should be disqualified because he was the best witness regarding a bogus subpoena that former Assistant Sheriff Don Haidl took with him when he met with Carona and secretly taped conversations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2007 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by two attorneys and a public relations advisor, Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona met with reporters one on one Tuesday, hours after he was named in a 10-count federal indictment accusing him of widespread corruption. The 20 or so reporters waiting outside his office were expecting to hear his side of the story. Each had a strictly enforced time limit of five minutes with the sheriff, just enough for two or three questions. And there was no shortage of potential questions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2008 | Christine Hanley and Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writers
Attorneys for former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona revealed Tuesday that the government plans to present additional allegations against Carona during his upcoming corruption trial, and argued that they are entitled to the information before the trial later this month. Jeffrey Rawitz, one of Carona's attorneys, said the defense became aware of the allegations during pretrial discussions with prosecutors, and asked that details be turned over to them. Senior Assistant U.S. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO
A contentious race for the next sheriff of Orange County will be decided in 18 days, prompting complaints from both camps of improper campaign activity. Last week, Sheriff's Sgt. Michael Harnish circulated a memo ordering deputies to remove stickers or decals from police vehicles and warned them against advocating for candidates while on duty after he spotted a "Paul Walters for Sheriff" decal on the back of a patrol car. Santa Ana Police Chief Paul Walters is running against Marshal Michael S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2004 | Stuart Pfeifer, Times Staff Writer
One of Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona's top assistants Thursday criticized a proposed initiative to take sales tax revenue from his department and give it to firefighters, a move that caused the firefighters union to accuse Carona of backing down from a campaign pledge and threatening their support for him. The Orange County Professional Firefighters Assn. supported Carona's campaign for sheriff in 1998, in part because he promised to support sharing sales tax revenue with firefighters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2006 | Jean O. Pasco and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
The chairman of the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Monday said he was satisfied that Sheriff Michael S. Carona had the legal authority to remove a campaign rival from his job as head of police services in San Clemente. William Campbell, after he and Supervisors Chris Norby and Lou Correa met separately with Carona, said that he urged the sheriff to publicly detail reasons for any action he might take against Lt. William Hunt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2007 | Christine Hanley and Garrett Therolf, Times Staff Writers
When a paintball firm began exploring the idea of opening a range in Orange County, they turned to an unlikely source: Sheriff Michael S. Carona. After Carona met with the business partners, one of Carona's associates told them the sheriff would do his best to help out with the deal but that it would cost them thousands of dollars, according to a federal criminal indictment made public last week. So, the indictment says, the businessmen ponied up $25,000 for Carona's influence in landing a site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2007 | Paul Pringle and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Near the gravel pits and scrap yards of east Los Angeles County, Donald Haidl made his fortune auctioning road-weary cars and trucks from lease fleets and government motor pools. The sales paid for homes in Newport Beach and Las Vegas, a private plane and a yacht named Quickhammer, after its bid-calling owner. Even Haidl's office in the City of Industry, a stucco box overlooking cracked asphalt and barbed wire, had expensive touches, including a Jacuzzi and private dressing room.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2008 | Stuart Pfeifer and Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writers
Lawyers for former Orange County Sheriff Michael S. Carona made one of the most pivotal arguments in his corruption case Friday, asking a judge to prohibit jurors from hearing secret recordings in which Carona reportedly discussed hiding evidence that he illegally received cash and gifts. Carona's lawyers said the recordings should be excluded because federal law prohibits prosecutors from contacting a target who has an attorney, even through a third party.
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