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BUSINESS
October 17, 2004
If we are going to err, it should be on the side of excess supply ("PUC to Tackle Electricity Plan," Oct. 12). It's better to have it and not need it. We should be thinking of ourselves as a regional supplier, using capacity when necessary and selling the surplus when supply outstrips demand. Even if that is not practical, we need the cushion. If history has taught us anything, it is that the greater cost is in not having enough energy, rather than having it at a somewhat higher price.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 2007
Regarding "GE, Pearson race to ready Dow Jones bid," June 19: If the Bancrofts, who control Dow Jones & Co., have any question about what Rupert Murdoch might do with the Wall Street Journal, they need look no further than Fox. With all due respect to Fox's outstanding financial reporters and anchors, its business programs are basically political platforms with just a bit of business thrown in. As the saying goes, you can't put lipstick on a...
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1998
I take strong issue with the premise of "Weaker Currency May Hasten Japan Recovery" [Aug. 6] and believe it is dangerous and will exacerbate current problems in Japan. First, devaluing the currency will heat up inflation in an economy already straining under the burden of artificially high prices. Second, it will be costly to Japanese corporations because it will raise the cost of goods. The assertion it will raise profits is made out of whole cloth. Third, even if the "solution" worked, when the currency began to rise in value the economy would go into a tailspin.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2004
If we are going to err, it should be on the side of excess supply ("PUC to Tackle Electricity Plan," Oct. 12). It's better to have it and not need it. We should be thinking of ourselves as a regional supplier, using capacity when necessary and selling the surplus when supply outstrips demand. Even if that is not practical, we need the cushion. If history has taught us anything, it is that the greater cost is in not having enough energy, rather than having it at a somewhat higher price.
BUSINESS
June 24, 2007
Regarding "GE, Pearson race to ready Dow Jones bid," June 19: If the Bancrofts, who control Dow Jones & Co., have any question about what Rupert Murdoch might do with the Wall Street Journal, they need look no further than Fox. With all due respect to Fox's outstanding financial reporters and anchors, its business programs are basically political platforms with just a bit of business thrown in. As the saying goes, you can't put lipstick on a...
BUSINESS
February 15, 2004
Whatever his shortcomings, Michael Eisner was wise enough to see that a deal in which Disney was required to share production costs yet receive only a distribution fee was a bad deal for the company ("Pixar Chief Disparages Disney's Creativity," Feb. 5). By the same token, Pixar's Steve Jobs should remember that a deal is a good deal only if it is good for both sides. It's hard to imagine any studio in Hollywood making a deal wherein it shares the liability of production costs but has no profit participation beyond a distribution fee. One mediocre film and a seemingly good deal becomes a financial drain -- all the more so when a studio has paid handsomely in the form of sharing production costs yet has no participation in back-end profit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999
Re "Building on the Past for a Future Westwood," Opinion, Dec. 26: While parking has been an issue in Westwood for years, the greater problem today is congestion. There are simply too many cars attempting to enter the area. An easier means of entry to Westwood Village needs to be implemented. Space and noise may preclude light rail, but alternatives to the car need to be studied and implemented in West Los Angeles or many of these enclaves will die. One of the biggest factors in the success of the 3rd Street Promenade is the large number of people who live within walking distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000
Re "Hollywood Bowl May Shed Famous Shell," Aug. 26: I'm wondering exactly what it is that the preservationists wish to preserve. The crumbling shell has been so changed in the last 30 years, it is not even a "shell" of its former self. The renovation will not only restore the previous decor, it will resolve an acoustical issue which has plagued it for as long as I can remember, and I've had seats at the Bowl since the 1960s. This problem of the musicians' inability to hear each other has been a problem for years and the Band-Aid approach to resolution to which John Mauceri refers has done nothing to resolve the issue.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1998
Carl G. Hokanson's letter characterizing Microsoft making price adjustments based on currency fluctuation as dumping is completely in error ["Is It 'Dumping' or a Double Standard?" Letters, Dec. 21]. Microsoft is not taking this action to achieve competitive advantage. The action is being taken in order to save and stabilize a market and to help keep the market viable. Further, since Windows is the primary operating system on the PC platform, it could be argued the action is both prudent and necessary to ensure the continued flow of other related goods which are exported from the United States.
OPINION
September 27, 2002
Re "Armey's Remarks Assailed," Sept. 25: House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas), speaking at an event in Florida, was quoted by a local paper as saying: "I always see two Jewish communities in America: one of deep intellect and one of shallow, superficial intellect. "Conservatives have a deeper intellect and tend to have occupations of the brain in fields like engineering, science and economics," Armey said, while liberals flock to "occupations of the heart." It would seem that Rep. Armey is the exception to the rule.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2004
Whatever his shortcomings, Michael Eisner was wise enough to see that a deal in which Disney was required to share production costs yet receive only a distribution fee was a bad deal for the company ("Pixar Chief Disparages Disney's Creativity," Feb. 5). By the same token, Pixar's Steve Jobs should remember that a deal is a good deal only if it is good for both sides. It's hard to imagine any studio in Hollywood making a deal wherein it shares the liability of production costs but has no profit participation beyond a distribution fee. One mediocre film and a seemingly good deal becomes a financial drain -- all the more so when a studio has paid handsomely in the form of sharing production costs yet has no participation in back-end profit.
OPINION
September 27, 2002
Re "Armey's Remarks Assailed," Sept. 25: House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-Texas), speaking at an event in Florida, was quoted by a local paper as saying: "I always see two Jewish communities in America: one of deep intellect and one of shallow, superficial intellect. "Conservatives have a deeper intellect and tend to have occupations of the brain in fields like engineering, science and economics," Armey said, while liberals flock to "occupations of the heart." It would seem that Rep. Armey is the exception to the rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2000
Re "Hollywood Bowl May Shed Famous Shell," Aug. 26: I'm wondering exactly what it is that the preservationists wish to preserve. The crumbling shell has been so changed in the last 30 years, it is not even a "shell" of its former self. The renovation will not only restore the previous decor, it will resolve an acoustical issue which has plagued it for as long as I can remember, and I've had seats at the Bowl since the 1960s. This problem of the musicians' inability to hear each other has been a problem for years and the Band-Aid approach to resolution to which John Mauceri refers has done nothing to resolve the issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1999
Re "Building on the Past for a Future Westwood," Opinion, Dec. 26: While parking has been an issue in Westwood for years, the greater problem today is congestion. There are simply too many cars attempting to enter the area. An easier means of entry to Westwood Village needs to be implemented. Space and noise may preclude light rail, but alternatives to the car need to be studied and implemented in West Los Angeles or many of these enclaves will die. One of the biggest factors in the success of the 3rd Street Promenade is the large number of people who live within walking distance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999
Why don't they demolish the Forum in Inglewood and build the NFL stadium there? That site wasn't available when this began. Staples only purchased the site to end the threat of litigation. The land is inexpensive and there's enough room for a new stadium as well as for parking structures that could adequately serve the needs of the stadium. The improvements required would be far less than the requirements for the Coliseum and the renovations for Exposition Park. Light rail already exists in the area and could be expanded, which would not only benefit a new stadium--it would benefit the entire area.
BUSINESS
September 6, 1998
I take strong issue with the premise of "Weaker Currency May Hasten Japan Recovery" [Aug. 6] and believe it is dangerous and will exacerbate current problems in Japan. First, devaluing the currency will heat up inflation in an economy already straining under the burden of artificially high prices. Second, it will be costly to Japanese corporations because it will raise the cost of goods. The assertion it will raise profits is made out of whole cloth. Third, even if the "solution" worked, when the currency began to rise in value the economy would go into a tailspin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999
Why don't they demolish the Forum in Inglewood and build the NFL stadium there? That site wasn't available when this began. Staples only purchased the site to end the threat of litigation. The land is inexpensive and there's enough room for a new stadium as well as for parking structures that could adequately serve the needs of the stadium. The improvements required would be far less than the requirements for the Coliseum and the renovations for Exposition Park. Light rail already exists in the area and could be expanded, which would not only benefit a new stadium--it would benefit the entire area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1997
Henry I. Miller's Column Right (May 20) was an astounding attack that harked back to the darkest days of red-baiting xenophobia. "Gore's green internationalist agenda"? "The schemes of radical environmentalists"? "Gore has led an assault on entire sectors of American industry"? Vice President Al Gore is a leader in the slightly more liberal of our two increasingly similar major political parties. You can think his environmental positions go too far, or not far enough, or are exactly balanced, but no informed person could be taken in by Miller's vicious rant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1998
Re "S.F. Schools Consider Nonwhite Writer Quota," March 12: I consider myself a liberal and open-minded and I can't think of a dumber idea. I heard one individual point out that we learned very little about the contributions of African Americans to the United States. I can only say that's a function of curriculum, not author selection by skin color. Such quotas equate quantity with quality without reference to what might be lost in leaving some off the list in order to meet some arbitrary figure.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1998
Carl G. Hokanson's letter characterizing Microsoft making price adjustments based on currency fluctuation as dumping is completely in error ["Is It 'Dumping' or a Double Standard?" Letters, Dec. 21]. Microsoft is not taking this action to achieve competitive advantage. The action is being taken in order to save and stabilize a market and to help keep the market viable. Further, since Windows is the primary operating system on the PC platform, it could be argued the action is both prudent and necessary to ensure the continued flow of other related goods which are exported from the United States.
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