Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMichael Tomlinson
IN THE NEWS

Michael Tomlinson

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever since punk rock was born, one part of the pop-music community has prided itself on antagonizing fans. Whether it's Johnny Rotten expectorating on audience members or Smashing Pumpkins' singer Billy Corgan throwing a temper tantrum as he did recently at the Pond of Anaheim, it's enough to make you wonder whatever happened to plain old good manners. Singer-songwriter Michael Tomlinson is doing what he can through his music to foster a sense of connection rather than combat among his fans.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever since punk rock was born, one part of the pop-music community has prided itself on antagonizing fans. Whether it's Johnny Rotten expectorating on audience members or Smashing Pumpkins' singer Billy Corgan throwing a temper tantrum as he did recently at the Pond of Anaheim, it's enough to make you wonder whatever happened to plain old good manners. Singer-songwriter Michael Tomlinson is doing what he can through his music to foster a sense of connection rather than combat among his fans.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1988 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Seattle-based singer-songwriter Michael Tomlinson had a lot of nerve suggesting a relationship between his work and that of Beat Generation patron saint Jack Kerouac during a song introduction Saturday at the Universal Amphitheatre. The tone of cozy ambivalence that characterized this show bore virtually no resemblance to anything in Kerouac's legacy of full commitment and chance-taking.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
A wine-and-cheese tent in the parking lot? New Age music on stage? At the Greek Theatre? Let's take the Volvo today, honey. NNew Age music made a bid for the big time on Sunday as David Lanz, David Arkenstone, Suzanne Ciani and Michael Tomlinson were packaged on a concert billed as "The Wave Summerfest." Did it work? Did New Age make its case to become the dominant sound of the '90s? The answer to the first question: Well, sorta. To the second: Not on your life. In fact, a good portion of the long, long program was like swimming through a vat of mayonnaise.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
A wine-and-cheese tent in the parking lot? New Age music on stage? At the Greek Theatre? Let's take the Volvo today, honey. NNew Age music made a bid for the big time on Sunday as David Lanz, David Arkenstone, Suzanne Ciani and Michael Tomlinson were packaged on a concert billed as "The Wave Summerfest." Did it work? Did New Age make its case to become the dominant sound of the '90s? The answer to the first question: Well, sorta. To the second: Not on your life. In fact, a good portion of the long, long program was like swimming through a vat of mayonnaise.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Michael Tomlinson is a music business phenomenon--a performer who is building a successful career from a part of the country far outside the traditional entertainment centers of power. Even more remarkable, the Seattle-based singer/songwriter has done it at his own pace, learning the difficult financial lessons the old-fashioned way--by starting his own record company--and insisting upon maintaining his personal integrity every step of the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
How can you not like a guy as determinedly upbeat as Michael Tomlinson? The Seattle singer-songwriter's concert on Wednesday at the Universal Amphitheatre was a perfect illustration of a performer whose optimism far outshines his dark side. Tomlinson's early identification as a "new age" singer continued to have a certain validity in his lyrics. Lines like "Let us dream that every rain cloud isn't there just to fall" abounded through most of his songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
By now you've probably heard that KTWV-FM (better known as the Wave) has abandoned its old no-deejay policy, bringing in a group of what new program director John Sebastian is terming "announcers" to provide listeners with programming information. "They're going to be discreet, brief and warm--I think they'll add a lot of humanity to the station," said Sebastian, who comes to the Wave after programming successful New Age-style formats in Washington and Phoenix.
SPORTS
November 1, 2004 | Bob Mieszerski, Times Staff Writer
Trainer Bobby Frankel made it a sweep of the stakes on Oak Tree's closing weekend, winning Sunday's $150,000 Las Palmas Handicap with 5-1 shot Theater R.N. On Saturday, the barn won the Morvich Handicap with Leroidesanimaux. In winning for the fourth time in five starts, Theater R.N., a 4-year-old daughter of Theatrical, used a strong late run to beat 4-1 shot Lots Of Hope, who is also trained by Frankel, by a half-length in the Grade II.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Michael Tomlinson's solo concert at the Coach House Saturday had the cozy feel of a gathering of friends in someone's living room. The sweet-toned singer and songwriter made everyone feel comfortable with between tune narratives and witty asides, and his seemingly heartfelt delivery included smiles at every turn.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
Michael Tomlinson is a music business phenomenon--a performer who is building a successful career from a part of the country far outside the traditional entertainment centers of power. Even more remarkable, the Seattle-based singer/songwriter has done it at his own pace, learning the difficult financial lessons the old-fashioned way--by starting his own record company--and insisting upon maintaining his personal integrity every step of the way.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1988 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Seattle-based singer-songwriter Michael Tomlinson had a lot of nerve suggesting a relationship between his work and that of Beat Generation patron saint Jack Kerouac during a song introduction Saturday at the Universal Amphitheatre. The tone of cozy ambivalence that characterized this show bore virtually no resemblance to anything in Kerouac's legacy of full commitment and chance-taking.
SPORTS
April 22, 2006 | BOB MIESZERSKI
Lost In The Fog, the champion sprinter of 2005, will make his first start since coming in seventh in the Breeders' Cup Sprint -- his first loss -- when he takes on four opponents in the $100,000 Golden Gate Fields Sprint today. Trained by Greg Gilchrist for owner Harry Aleo, Lost In The Fog, a 4-year-old Lost Soldier colt, won the first 10 starts of his career before the Breeders' Cup last Oct. 29 at Belmont Park, where he was the 7-10 favorite.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The destiny of Larry Kramer has been to disturb. Disturb his family with the revelation of his gay identity. Disturb gays with his clarion calls, long before the AIDS crisis, for monogamy. And disturb presumptions of those who assume that any play by America's Angriest Gay Man is going to be just, well, angry. "The Destiny of Me," Kramer's follow-up to his earlier, very angry "The Normal Heart," is much more interesting precisely because it is not a polemic.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|