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Michel Hazanavicius

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Artist" manages the seemingly impossible: It's a new silent film that pays thoughtful tribute to the traditions of the past while creating great fun for modern audiences. Which is just what French director Michel Hazanavicius had in mind. "A silent film is a very special experience. … It's not intellectual, it's emotional. You take it in the way you take in music," Hazanavicius explains, tired but still engaging at the end of a day spent coping with a deluge of media requests.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
The hustle and bustle of the annual awards circuit can have unintended results, such as creating unlikely introductions. "The Past," which opens Friday in Los Angeles, brings together Iranian filmmaker Asghar Farhadi and French Argentine actress Bérénice Bejo. The two first met in passing in Los Angeles when each was on the Oscar circuit a couple of years ago. Farhadi was promoting "A Separation," which would win the Oscar for foreign language film and be nominated for screenplay, while Bejo was supporting eventual best picture winner "The Artist," for which she also earned a supporting actress nomination.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Artist" has won the Oscar for best picture and I'm speechless. It's not lack of passion for the film that has robbed me of the power of words; it's that I felt so strongly that my thoughts were geared to how I would react should the worst happen, but like the flabbergasted editors from "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," victory was something I didn't expect. I knew, of course, that "The Artist" was considered the favorite, but I wasn't so sure. As someone who first heard about this project while it was quietly filming on the streets and back lots of Hollywood, I was intensely aware of how enormous a leap it would be for what is basically a French silent picture that didn't even think it would get American distribution to walk off with what the ABC telecast called "the most coveted award in motion pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By John Horn and Steven Zeitchik
In a surprise defeat for Steven Spielberg and "Lincoln," Ben Affleck won the Golden Globe for directing "Argo. " A clearly stunned Affleck, who earlier this week was noticeably not shortlisted for the directing Oscar, said he didn't care what the award was -- he was honored to have been nominated alongside the "exceptional talents" of Spielberg, Ang Lee ("Life of Pi"), Quentin Tarantino ("Django Unchained"), Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty").
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Artist" is the wonder of the age, as much a miracle as "Avatar," though it comes at things from the totally opposite direction. Far from embracing the most modern cinematic techniques, "The Artist" is a glorious throwback, a black-and-white silent movie that manages the impossible: It strikes an exact balance between the traditions of the past and the demands of the present, managing to be true to the look and spirit of bygone times while...
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Everybody has them — waiters, bus drivers, lawyers: a bad day. For a filmmaker with a hundred-strong crew in the wings and millions of dollars on the line, the stakes can be considerably higher when things go off the rails. In this edited excerpt from the third annual Envelope Directors' Roundtable, the filmmakers behind some of this season's most talked about movies — Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Michel Hazanavicius ("The Artist"), Alexander Payne ("The Descendants"), George Clooney ("The Ides of March")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2011 | By Todd Martens, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Ludovic Bource | "The Artist" There was, of course, a bit of a history lesson that French composer Ludovic Bource embarked upon while working on "The Artist. " Some of the touchstones for director Michel Hazanavicius' silent film about the end of the silent film era were clear, such as "Sunset Boulevard" and the music of the late film composer Franz Waxman. Yet Bource also immersed himself in the work of early Russian filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein and classical masters such as Johannes Brahms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By John Horn and Steven Zeitchik
In a surprise defeat for Steven Spielberg and "Lincoln," Ben Affleck won the Golden Globe for directing "Argo. " A clearly stunned Affleck, who earlier this week was noticeably not shortlisted for the directing Oscar, said he didn't care what the award was -- he was honored to have been nominated alongside the "exceptional talents" of Spielberg, Ang Lee ("Life of Pi"), Quentin Tarantino ("Django Unchained"), Tom Hooper ("Les Miserables") and Kathryn Bigelow ("Zero Dark Thirty").
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
France's super secret agent man is back in "OSS 117 — Lost in Rio," and he's better, and worse, than ever with a lot of bang, bang, bang, stumble, bumble, fumble in flashy '60s era suits of impeccably poor taste. The latest edition of the French spoof again stars Jean Dujardin as Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath, an idiot suave-ant of secret agents with brilliantine hair and a specialty for sailing through politically incorrect pronouncements with the same aplomb he does shoot-outs with bad guys.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Everywhere you looked in 2011 — and, more to the point, everywhere you listened — you could hear the sounds of a renewal of interest in silent films. The way Michel Hazanavicius' modern silent "The Artist" turned its rapturous festival appearances into Oscar contender status is the most obvious example, but it's far from the only one. For one thing, the life and career of French pioneer Georges Méliès (whose restored 1902 "A Trip to the Moon" was a hit at Cannes this year)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Artist" has won the Oscar for best picture and I'm speechless. It's not lack of passion for the film that has robbed me of the power of words; it's that I felt so strongly that my thoughts were geared to how I would react should the worst happen, but like the flabbergasted editors from "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo," victory was something I didn't expect. I knew, of course, that "The Artist" was considered the favorite, but I wasn't so sure. As someone who first heard about this project while it was quietly filming on the streets and back lots of Hollywood, I was intensely aware of how enormous a leap it would be for what is basically a French silent picture that didn't even think it would get American distribution to walk off with what the ABC telecast called "the most coveted award in motion pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2012 | By John Horn and Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The movie of the fewest words spoke the loudest at the Oscars this year. On an evening suffused with nostalgia, "The Artist," a nearly wordless, black-and-white romance celebrating Hollywood's formative era, won five Academy Awards, including best picture, on Sunday night. The French production also took home directing honors for Michel Hazanavicius, the lead actor award for Jean Dujardin and trophies for costume design and score. Producer Thomas Langmann dedicated his best picture Oscar to his filmmaker father, who died in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Momentous choices accompanied by a ukulele; life-altering decisions made in a Hawaiian shirt, Bermuda shorts and a day-old beard. Simple, honest, real life, right now. Our humanity beautifully rendered in a world where nothing is black and white. That is "The Descendants," the latest and best entry in filmmaker Alexander Payne's remarkable oeuvre . It has the edgy insight, tangy humor and compassionate eye that have come to characterize his films, "Sideways," "About Schmidt" and "Election" among them.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Everybody has them — waiters, bus drivers, lawyers: a bad day. For a filmmaker with a hundred-strong crew in the wings and millions of dollars on the line, the stakes can be considerably higher when things go off the rails. In this edited excerpt from the third annual Envelope Directors' Roundtable, the filmmakers behind some of this season's most talked about movies — Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Michel Hazanavicius ("The Artist"), Alexander Payne ("The Descendants"), George Clooney ("The Ides of March")
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
Originally, Michel Hazanavicius admits, "The Artist" wasn't supposed to have a Hollywood happy ending. Au contraire. When the French writer-director first conceived his black-and-white tribute to the silent film, he was influenced by the sinister stylings of German Expressionist masters including F.W. Murnau and Robert Wiene. One early screenplay proposal set "The Artist" in Berlin and drew a parallel between the rise of the sound era and the Nazis' brutal ascent. It ended with its protagonist committing suicide.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
As a front-runner to win top honors in the upcoming Academy Awards ceremony, "The Artist" is a rarity. Not only is it in black and white, almost entirely silent and a French director's take on old Hollywood, it is the only movie among the nine best picture nominees filmed entirely in Los Angeles. The 1960s civil rights drama "The Help," another potential favorite for best picture, was shot in Mississippi; "The Descendants," starring George Clooney, was filmed in Hawaii; and Martin Scorsese's "Hugo," a whimsical tale about the early days of cinema, was produced mainly on a soundstage in the United Kingdom.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2008 | Mark Olsen; Robert Abele; Gary Goldstein
Based on a long-running French spy character who actually predates James Bond, "OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies" is a loving spoof of Cold War espionage thrillers, done with a spot-on re-creation of the look, sound and feel of a genuine 1950s Technicolor production. Men wear sharp suits, the women wear slinky dresses and everyone can dance the mambo reasonably well. The film, directed by Michel Hazanavicius, counts as its No. 1 asset an impeccable sense of where to draw the line, always letting its eyebrow arch only just enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | John Horn
They have worked in diverse disciplines -- acting, screenwriting, theater, television, exploitation films -- were born in three countries and have made radically dissimilar movies. But there's a lot more that unifies the five filmmakers who recently came together at the Los Angeles Times for the third annual Envelope Directors' Roundtable. For one thing, their movies are being hailed for standing among this year's Oscar contenders: Martin Scorsese's "Hugo," Alexander Payne's "The Descendants," Michel Hazanavicius' "The Artist," Stephen Daldry's "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close" and George Clooney's "The Ides of March.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
Hollywood celebrated a foreign invasion at Sunday's Golden Globes, as films and television shows with a distinctly international pedigree collected many of the evening's prizes. "The Artist," French filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius's ode to silent movies, was the night's top honoree, winning three awards. In the comedy or musical category, the black-and-white movie was named best picture, while Jean Dujardin was named actor for his performance as a silent film star made obsolete by the arrival of talkies.
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