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Michelangelo Antonioni

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Michelangelo Antonioni, the master Italian film director who depicted the emotional alienation of Italy's postwar generation in films such as "L'Avventura" and "La Notte" but achieved his greatest popular success with "Blowup," an enigmatic tale set in swinging London of the 1960s, has died. He was 94. Antonioni, who suffered a debilitating stroke in 1985 that severely limited his ability to speak, died at his home in Rome on Monday evening, according to Italy's ANSA news agency.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Susan King
If "Pacific Rim" is not your cup of tea, there are several alternatives this weekend for the serious cineaste.  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Hitchcock 9 series, featuring newly restored silent movies from the Master of Suspense, concludes this weekend. Hitch's feature directorial debut, 1926's "The Pleasure Garden," screens Friday at the Bing Theater, along with 1927's "Easy Virtue. " Rounding out the festival Saturday is a rare comedy, 1928's "The Farmer's Wife," followed by 1929's thriller "Blackmail.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
MICHELANGELO Antonioni, who died last month at age 94, was once one of the most fashionable filmmakers in the world. He remains among the most influential, judging by the extent to which his oblique, deliberate style can still be felt among today's most celebrated art-film directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012
Herbie Hancock composed the score for what Michelangelo Antonioni classic? "Blow-Up," which was released in 1966
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1995 | CHARLOTTE CHANDLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The American Film Institute opens the Los Angeles Film Festival on Thursday night with "Beyond the Clouds," a picture almost no one believed could be made. Its director, Italian film legend Michelangelo Antonioni, has spent the past 10 years in near-silence following a massive stroke in 1985. One who did believe was Enrica Antonioni, wife of the 83-year-old director and the film's executive consultant. "It was raining and raining and raining," she recalled of the first days of shooting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012
Herbie Hancock composed the score for what Michelangelo Antonioni classic? "Blow-Up," which was released in 1966
NEWS
August 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Cinema lovers and fans joined family members and friends at Rome's City Hall on Wednesday to pay their respects to the late Italian movie director Michelangelo Antonioni. A darling of avant-garde cinema and a celebrated filmmaker across the world, Antonioni died Monday at 94. During a career that spanned six decades, he made such films as "L'Avventura," "Blowup" and "Zabriskie Point" and was recognized with an Academy Award for lifetime achievement.
NEWS
September 15, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
THE "Modernist Master: Michelangelo Antonioni" series, which continues this weekend at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, presents more of the director's early work, along with a new documentary: "Being With Michelangelo," made by his wife, Enrica Fico Antonioni, and screening Saturday with the Antonionis in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013 | By Susan King
If "Pacific Rim" is not your cup of tea, there are several alternatives this weekend for the serious cineaste.  The Los Angeles County Museum of Art's Hitchcock 9 series, featuring newly restored silent movies from the Master of Suspense, concludes this weekend. Hitch's feature directorial debut, 1926's "The Pleasure Garden," screens Friday at the Bing Theater, along with 1927's "Easy Virtue. " Rounding out the festival Saturday is a rare comedy, 1928's "The Farmer's Wife," followed by 1929's thriller "Blackmail.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ridiculous 14 years that it's taken Michelangelo Antonioni's sublime "Identification of a Woman" to open here merely underlines the timelessness and modernity of one of the world's greatest living directors. All that keeps it from seeming brand-new is that the color is sadly beginning to fade from the inimitable images captured by master cinematographer Carlo di Palma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Tonino Guerra, an internationally renowned Italian screenwriter who collaborated with Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni and other greats of Italian and world cinema on films such as Fellini's "Amarcord" and Antonioni's "L'Avventura" and "Blow-Up," has died. He was 92. Guerra died Wednesday at his home in Santarcangelo di Romagna, in northern Italy, according to an announcement on the Tonino Guerra Cultural Assn. website. A poet, novelist and former schoolteacher, Guerra began his screenwriting career in Rome in the mid-1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For a director of his stature, Michelangelo Antonioni has never been well represented on home video in the United States. In the years since his death (at age 94 in 2007), a few releases have helped fill in the gaps. "Zabriskie Point" (1970), his queasy, vivid portrait of the American counterculture's death throes, is available from Warner Home Video. The Criterion Collection last year issued — in both standard-definition and Blu-ray formats — Antonioni's first color film, the modernist classic "Red Desert" (1964)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Decades before the phenomena of Candace Bushnell's "Sex and the City" would redefine girl power in such sexually assertive terms, there was Michelangelo Antonioni's "The Girlfriends," a brisk tale about a clique of fashion-forward, independent-thinking young women in Turin, who went to all the best parties and slept with the men they wanted to. The year was 1955, the legendary Italian filmmaker was 43 and just 13 years into a career that would have a...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
MICHELANGELO Antonioni, who died last month at age 94, was once one of the most fashionable filmmakers in the world. He remains among the most influential, judging by the extent to which his oblique, deliberate style can still be felt among today's most celebrated art-film directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2007 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
How ironic -- yet oddly fitting -- that Michelangelo Antonioni should die in Italy, at 94, the day after Ingmar Bergman died at 89 in Sweden. At the time of their deaths they were arguably Europe's two most famous great film directors. How very different they were in style, temperament and culture: Bergman grappled with faith and the danger of its loss while Antonioni became the master of alienation.
NEWS
August 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Cinema lovers and fans joined family members and friends at Rome's City Hall on Wednesday to pay their respects to the late Italian movie director Michelangelo Antonioni. A darling of avant-garde cinema and a celebrated filmmaker across the world, Antonioni died Monday at 94. During a career that spanned six decades, he made such films as "L'Avventura," "Blowup" and "Zabriskie Point" and was recognized with an Academy Award for lifetime achievement.
NEWS
September 22, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
MARCUS Mandal and Ann von Lowzow's "Karen Blixen: Out of This World" is an illuminating, poignant documentary of the acclaimed writer better known by her pen name, Isak Dinesen -- and who became even more famous when she was played by Meryl Streep in the Oscar-winning 1985 "Out of Africa."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
IT'S hard to imagine a film that's been written about more and seen less than "The Passenger." One of the enigmatic masterworks of modern cinema, the 1975 Michelangelo Antonioni movie has been out of circulation for years -- it's never been on DVD and was only briefly available on video in the mid-1980s. But thanks to Sony Pictures Classics, the film opens Nov. 4 for a weeklong run at the Nuart, with a DVD release to follow early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2007 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Michelangelo Antonioni, the master Italian film director who depicted the emotional alienation of Italy's postwar generation in films such as "L'Avventura" and "La Notte" but achieved his greatest popular success with "Blowup," an enigmatic tale set in swinging London of the 1960s, has died. He was 94. Antonioni, who suffered a debilitating stroke in 1985 that severely limited his ability to speak, died at his home in Rome on Monday evening, according to Italy's ANSA news agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
IT'S hard to imagine a film that's been written about more and seen less than "The Passenger." One of the enigmatic masterworks of modern cinema, the 1975 Michelangelo Antonioni movie has been out of circulation for years -- it's never been on DVD and was only briefly available on video in the mid-1980s. But thanks to Sony Pictures Classics, the film opens Nov. 4 for a weeklong run at the Nuart, with a DVD release to follow early next year.
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