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Michele Lamy

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May 16, 1990 | GAILE ROBINSON
When she was a teen-ager she performed the striptease at county fairs in France. In time, she settled down and got a law degree. He was a performance artist who had a street evangelist act, "The Great and Glorious Reverend Rick." To pair them up would be either the act of a twisted Hollywood scriptwriter or a delicious twist of fate. In their case the fates took the upper hand. The French country girl, Michele Lamy, has become one of the best known clothing designers in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
May 16, 1990 | GAILE ROBINSON
When she was a teen-ager she performed the striptease at county fairs in France. In time, she settled down and got a law degree. He was a performance artist who had a street evangelist act, "The Great and Glorious Reverend Rick." To pair them up would be either the act of a twisted Hollywood scriptwriter or a delicious twist of fate. In their case the fates took the upper hand. The French country girl, Michele Lamy, has become one of the best known clothing designers in Los Angeles.
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NEWS
August 16, 1989 | ANNE BOGART
In Paris, women clutch flirtatious little Chanel bags, so small they hold next to nothing. In New York, they take the opposite tack, lugging mega-tote bags that bend their backs into Quasimodo crouches, so they can keep their subway reading, gym clothes and other such sundries close at hand. But in Los Angeles, women breeze around town carrying nothing except a set of keys. That's because the quintessential California purse comes with four wheels and a trunk.
NEWS
July 24, 1987
10 musts for any clubs invitation list: Richard Duardo, L.A.'s version of Andy Warhol. Michele Lamy, hot fashion designer who loves to be seen. Allee Willis, songwriter/painter who just wants to have fun. David Schiff, CAA agent who's always in the right place at the right time. Billy Gerber, Warner Bros. v.p. known as the rock 'n' roll exec. Timothy and Barbara Leary, the former LSD guru and his wife who count as one. Charlie Minor, A&M senior v.p. who always has 20 people in tow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004 | Booth Moore
Les Deux Cafes, the leafy Hollywood hotspot that was a favorite with Cameron Diaz, Jake Gyllenhaal, Kirsten Dunst, Rosanna Arquette, Billy Zane and others, closed its doors without warning Dec. 30. "It was a total surprise," said Audrey Bernstein, who hosted the popular Monday-night club Cachet there for three years. Richard Newton, who was running the restaurant and bar on Las Palmas Avenue when it closed, would not comment on the closure when reached by phone Friday.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | WILLIAM KISSEL
Art by Henry Matisse, Robert Longo and Andy Warhol may have been on the walls. But guests attending the ART/LA '90 preview party Wednesday night opted for art of the wearable kind by such fashion designers as Jean Paul Gautier, Valentino, Betsy Johnson and Commes des Garcons. Although the event was billed around an Earth theme, few party-goers taking in the fifth international contemporary art fair got the message.
MAGAZINE
December 5, 1999 | Mark Ehrman
Scan the tables at chichi Les Deux Cafes and you'll notice something missing. Salt and pepper shakers. You can ask, of course, but that might be a trifle gauche. "Everything is seasoned properly," insists owner Michele Lamy. "We're thinking that too much salt is not good for you. Because everything is organic and in season, we ask people to taste the natural flavor of the food." It's the same story over at Joachim Splichal's Patina.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1991 | Nick Adams, Edited by MARY McNAMARA
Like Paris in the '20s, Los Angeles has little pockets of expatriate artists: SWEDISH ROCKERS Little Stockholm forms at lunchtime in the store-lined alley known as the Hollywood Passage (6752 Hollywood Blvd.). Many of its denizens are students at the nearby Musicians Institute of Technology. They lounge at the outdoor tables of the Back Alley Cafe, bottom left, and get their tresses blow-dried at the Blue Velvet salon ("Your Hairslaves"), where the two Swedish hairdressers speak their language.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | JOANNA DENDEL
Working girls who favor Paris labels take note: Christian Dior has designed this soignee black crepe pantsuit trimmed in red with a red lapel and worn with a red grosgrain ascot. In the United States, the suit retails for $3,985. (In Los Angeles, you can find a skirted-suit version of this look at I. Magnin for $2,750, the matching pants are $980.) The model is holding a black cashmere coat, $4,770, that is available at the new Christian Dior boutique on Rodeo Drive.
NEWS
October 9, 1989 | RICHARD ROUILARD
For vogue-ing fans in Los Angeles, this was the summer of our discontent. The East Coast dance craze never found a home here. Or a house. Houses are groups of voguers under the leadership of a fashion designer usually, like "House of Chanel" or "House of Patricia Fields." In New York, there are dozens of houses. On the runways in Paris and Milan, vogue-ing is the ne plus ultra touch that has made the collections of Jean-Paul Gaultier, Thierry Mugler and Patrick Kelly something to watch.
NEWS
September 28, 1990 | GAILE ROBINSON
Models do not get to keep the clothes they wear in fashion shows; that's a myth. Fashion designers don't have a closet jampacked with one-of-a-kind items because they never have time to sew for themselves. And people who work in the wholesale showrooms and fashion offices of the California Mart eventually have to shop in the department stores just like the rest of us. Folks in the fashion business are just that--folks.
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