Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsMichigan Education
IN THE NEWS

Michigan Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the money ran out there was still snow on the ground. So last March, the schools in Kalkaska, Mich., closed 10 weeks early, giving 2,300 students and 124 teachers an unexpected and mostly unwanted vacation. The crisis in Kalkaska, a small town in the northwest corner of Michigan's lower peninsula, was precipitated by the refusal of voters to approve a property tax increase.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the money ran out there was still snow on the ground. So last March, the schools in Kalkaska, Mich., closed 10 weeks early, giving 2,300 students and 124 teachers an unexpected and mostly unwanted vacation. The crisis in Kalkaska, a small town in the northwest corner of Michigan's lower peninsula, was precipitated by the refusal of voters to approve a property tax increase.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Sometime in the spring, Randy Dietrich hopes to take out a loan to cover his daughter's college tuition costs. In the fall, 5-year-old Heather Dietrich will enter the first grade. Dietrich, laid off not long ago from his Lansing-area construction job, is not just being overly nervous about his child's future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1988 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
A Michigan state college president fluent in Spanish and with experience at a California community college was chosen Wednesday as the new chancellor of the San Diego Community College District by the board of trustees. J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1988 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
A Michigan state college president fluent in Spanish and with experience at a California community college was chosen Wednesday as the new chancellor of the San Diego Community College District by the board of trustees. J.
NEWS
March 25, 1985 | United Press International
A man who says he was severely frostbitten while waiting outside a church to get free government cheese and butter is suing both the state and a church agency for at least $10,000 each. The suits were filed last week by Albert Bago, 61, of Southfield, who has been out of work since 1980, when he was laid off as a machinist at Tishkin Products. He is a diabetic and suffered a stroke shortly after losing his job. On Feb.
NEWS
August 20, 1993 | EDWARD WALSH, THE WASHINGTON POST
At a ceremony outside a historic one-room schoolhouse, the state of Michigan embarked Thursday on a potential revolution in public education. Republican Gov. John Engler signed legislation that next year will eliminate local property taxes as a source of funds for public schools, a radical and unprecedented step that many here hope will lead to a fundamental restructuring of the school system.
NEWS
September 4, 1986 | From Associated Press
More than 7,000 teachers were on strike over contract disputes in eight states Wednesday, leaving nearly 118,000 students without classes or in abbreviated sessions. "We are talking everything--salaries and fringe benefits," Barbara R. Goda, president of the Schuylkill Valley Teacher's Assn. in Pennsylvania, said of negotiations in her district.
NEWS
September 14, 1987 | Associated Press
A contract stalemate continued Sunday in the nation's third-largest school district, leading officials to cancel classes today. Chicago school board spokesman Robert Saigh said the two sides did not meet Sunday after a 10-hour negotiating session Saturday produced little progress. "It doesn't look good," Saigh said. Meanwhile, strikes continued in six other states, with only one district, in Michigan, reporting a tentative settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1987
Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) wants to borrow an idea from Michigan that might help families stop worrying about where the money will come from when their children are ready for college. The idea comes from Gov. James J. Blanchard of Michigan, where about $3,000 paid into a state trust fund will cover tuition at the University of Michigan or any other public college 18 years from now--when tuition is expected to cost more than $20,000 for four years.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Sometime in the spring, Randy Dietrich hopes to take out a loan to cover his daughter's college tuition costs. In the fall, 5-year-old Heather Dietrich will enter the first grade. Dietrich, laid off not long ago from his Lansing-area construction job, is not just being overly nervous about his child's future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2011 | Larry Gordon
For the first time, the total amount that University of California students pay in tuition this year will surpass the funding the prestigious public university receives from the state. It is a historic shift for the UC system and part of a national trend that is changing the nature of public higher education. Propelled by budget crises in California and elsewhere, the burden of paying for education at a public college or university, once heavily subsidized by taxpayers, is shifting to students and their families.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The word could come from anywhere. A rumor passed along by a friend. An item in a newspaper hinting at a pending sweep. Just a whisper was enough, and they'd be off, bags quickly packed and plans strictly adhered to. The key, Muriel Goldsmith remembers, was to stay invisible. Out of sight meant out of reach, and out of reach meant, in those troubled postwar years, no subpoena to testify before government committees rooting Communists from positions of power and influence.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|