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NEWS
March 7, 2000 | From Associated Press
Greeted by teddy bears and extra security, Buell Elementary School children returned to class Monday for the first time since a first-grader was shot to death in a classroom. Children and parents alike expressed fears at first about returning to the school where 6-year-old Kayla Rolland was killed Feb. 29, allegedly by another first-grader. "He was afraid it was going to be him next," Lisa Davidson said of her second-grade son, Tim.
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NEWS
March 3, 2000 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shootings this week at a grammar school in Michigan and fast-food restaurants in Pennsylvania have prompted lawmakers to renew efforts to break a congressional deadlock on gun legislation. Challenged by President Clinton on NBC-TV's "Today" show, four senior Republican and Democratic lawmakers agreed to meet at the White House on Tuesday. The congressional delegation will include Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.
NEWS
March 2, 2000 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 6-year-old boy who allegedly shot and killed his first-grade classmate had been living in a drug-infested flophouse where police found stolen guns and a cache of drugs, authorities said Wednesday. The child had a history of violence at school, his father reported from his jail cell--and did not even have a bed to sleep on.
NEWS
March 1, 2000 | STEPHEN BRAUN and JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A first-grade classroom became the latest bloodstained stage in the nation's rash of school shootings Tuesday as a 6-year-old boy pointed a gun at a classmate and then fired. The 6-year-old girl crumpled to the floor, fatally wounded. Officials in this working-class community 60 miles north of Detroit were investigating reports that the two children had quarreled on the playground at Buell Elementary School on Monday. Relatives identified the dead girl as Kayla Rolland.
NEWS
May 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
Four teenagers plotted to buy and steal weapons for a massacre at their middle school that would top the death toll at Columbine High School, a prosecutor said Tuesday. "This was to be a Colorado-style shooting and bombing. . . . The goal was to kill more people than in Columbine," said St. Clair County Assistant Prosecutor Michael Wendling, referring to last month's Littleton school shootings in which two gunmen killed 13 people, then themselves.
NEWS
May 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
Four boys were in custody Saturday on charges they plotted a shooting at their middle school similar to last month's rampage at Colorado's Columbine High School. Justin Schnepp and Jedaiah Zinzo, both 14, were charged as adults Thursday with conspiracy to commit murder for allegedly planning to kill classmates at the 560-student Holland Woods Middle School. The two were each held on $100,000 bail. The two others, ages 12 and 13, have been charged as juveniles with the same crime.
NEWS
September 19, 1997 | Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday ordered a San Diego company to remove from schools an estimated 650,000 pounds of strawberries that caused an outbreak of hepatitis A among Michigan schoolchildren. Andrew & Williamson Sales Co. must retrieve the frozen berries, stored at schools in 16 states and the District of Columbia, within 60 days, U.S. District Judge Leland Nielsen said. Morgan Scudie, a lawyer for the company, said it "is ready to initiate a recall as soon as the [U.S.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Officials in Portage, Mich., have banned a 9-year-old girl with the AIDS virus from attending school, citing safety concerns, but the girl's mother says the ban is a case of discrimination. The mother, who asked that her name not be used, said she was informed by a district official that her daughter could not report to Woodland Elementary School. Citing confidentiality concerns, Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1997 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A hepatitis A scare that was kicked off when possibly tainted strawberries made their way into Los Angeles public school lunches should soon be over, according to public health officials. No cases of infection by the highly contagious virus have been linked to consumption of fruit cups containing the berries, according to Dr. David Dassey, a Los Angeles County epidemiologist. The strawberries came from a shipment linked to three hepatitis outbreaks in Michigan.
NEWS
March 13, 1994 | JOHN FLESHER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Driving 10-year-old Kim to school before continuing on to work has become second nature for Irene Beltnick. She's been doing it since September, when Kalkaska schools cut bus service to save money. Getting Kim home each afternoon can be trickier, but they manage. "It just takes a little more planning and forethought," Beltnick said with a resigned smile as her daughter bounced from the car outside Birch Street Elementary School. The struggle continues in Kalkaska, the small factory town and retirement haven in northern Michigan that lost its anonymity a year ago when school closed 10 weeks early.
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