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Michoacan Mexico

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2007 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
At churches, soccer fields and the supermarkets where more tortillas than bread are sold, Mexican immigrants are learning about their chance to vote in elections back home. Michoacan immigrant groups throughout the U.S. are telling fellow natives of that central Mexican state that they can cast absentee ballots for governor in November. Michoacan is the first Mexican state to give migrants in the United States the means to vote. A law approved Feb.
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SCIENCE
April 13, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Colorado researchers have discovered and partially mapped a major urban center once occupied by the Purépecha of Mexico, a little-known people who fought the Aztecs to a standstill and who controlled much of western Mexico until diseases brought by the Spanish decimated them. The "proto-urban center," which researchers have not yet named, sat on volcanic rock on the shores of Lake Pátzcuaro in the central Mexican state of Michoacan, now a tourist destination. It supported as many as 40,000 people until the consolidation of the Purépecha empire about AD 1350 led most of its inhabitants to relocate to the new capital of Tzintzuntzan, six miles away.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Mexican immigrants in Santa Ana met Michoacan Gov. Lazaro Cardenas Batel on Friday to pay homage to this grandson of a Mexican president, who is remembered for nationalizing the country's petroleum industry. They came to ask for help, for new plazas and roads back in Michoacan. And they came to see a Mexican leader who, with their help, could someday become that nation's president.
WORLD
June 18, 2007 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
The pork carnitas were served hot and greasy with a side of fresh green chile salsa and a stack of handmade tortillas off a griddle about 20 feet away. Conversation was nearly impossible with the seven-piece mariachi band blasting away tableside, so Jorge Luis Castenada Castillo went ahead and brought the works: cold beer, a pitcher of juice and a bottle of Johnny Walker Black Label Scotch. "How's that?" he said. "Can I get you anything else?"
NEWS
December 5, 1988
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari removed the governor of Michoacan state from office after a weeklong occupation of municipal buildings across the southwestern state by opposition supporters. Salinas, who took office this week, appointed the governor, Luis Martinez Villacana, as director of federal roads and bridges.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Lazaro Cardenas, leftist scion of a revered political family, claimed victory in the race for governor of Mexico's Michoacan state after an exit poll gave him a 5-percentage-point lead over his nearest rival. Cardenas, of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, said he had a considerable advantage in the race against Alfredo Anaya, of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, which ruled Mexico for 71 years.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Democratic Revolutionary Party militants Friday said they will abandon 71 of the 76 town halls in the central state of Michoacan that they have occupied for the last six weeks to protest alleged fraud in the July state legislature election. Instead, the PRD, as the left-of-center party is called, will begin its campaign for the election of 113 municipal presidents, or mayors, that is to be held in Michoacan in December, Sen. Roberto Robles Garnica announced in Michoacan.
NEWS
November 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Opposition party supporters seized city halls throughout the state of Michoacan and demanded the resignation of the governor, a member of the ruling party, officials said Sunday. Democratic Front supporters occupied 19 city halls Saturday afternoon to force the ouster of Gov. Luis Martinez Villicana, according to a state government statement. Villicana is a member of the governing Institutional Revolutionary Party.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nearly every building was damaged or destroyed. The grammar school was split in two. And the 45-foot bell tower at the Roman Catholic church was bent. As officials reviewed Sunday's aftermath from an earthquake in central Mexico, they found most of the damage concentrated in the Pacific Coast state of Michoacan--particularly in the small town of Arteaga. Nationwide, there were no casualties.
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexican President Felipe Calderon didn't wait long to challenge the violent drug traffickers that control parts of Michoacan, his home state. But Operation Michoacan United, announced Monday, so far looks like a bust -- and not the kind Calderon had in mind. A week after taking the oath of office, Calderon ordered more than 6,000 soldiers, sailors and federal police to swarm towns where warring drug smugglers are believed responsible for as many as 500 killings this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2007 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
At churches, soccer fields and the supermarkets where more tortillas than bread are sold, Mexican immigrants are learning about their chance to vote in elections back home. Michoacan immigrant groups throughout the U.S. are telling fellow natives of that central Mexican state that they can cast absentee ballots for governor in November. Michoacan is the first Mexican state to give migrants in the United States the means to vote. A law approved Feb.
WORLD
December 16, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
Mexican President Felipe Calderon didn't wait long to challenge the violent drug traffickers that control parts of Michoacan, his home state. But Operation Michoacan United, announced Monday, so far looks like a bust -- and not the kind Calderon had in mind. A week after taking the oath of office, Calderon ordered more than 6,000 soldiers, sailors and federal police to swarm towns where warring drug smugglers are believed responsible for as many as 500 killings this year.
WORLD
September 18, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Federal and local police swept across Michoacan on Saturday, hunting for the gunmen who assassinated the southern state's head of public safety during a birthday dinner at a crowded restaurant. Rogelio Zarazua Ortega, civilian overseer of Michoacan's police force, was shot Friday night as he sat at a table with two dozen friends and relatives. Also gunned down was one of Zarazua's police bodyguards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2005 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
Not far from the county offices and the courthouses that define Santa Ana as the heart of Orange County government, the Uruapan Body Shop opens for business each day. Not far away is Patzcuaro Restaurant and just down the road is the Michoacan Beauty Shop. The businesses and many more in the predominately Latino city are named after towns in Michoacan, a state in central Mexico. Leaders of a local Michoacan Federation say as many as one in five Mexicans in Santa Ana come from there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Mexican immigrants in Santa Ana met Michoacan Gov. Lazaro Cardenas Batel on Friday to pay homage to this grandson of a Mexican president, who is remembered for nationalizing the country's petroleum industry. They came to ask for help, for new plazas and roads back in Michoacan. And they came to see a Mexican leader who, with their help, could someday become that nation's president.
NEWS
November 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Lazaro Cardenas, leftist scion of a revered political family, claimed victory in the race for governor of Mexico's Michoacan state after an exit poll gave him a 5-percentage-point lead over his nearest rival. Cardenas, of the Party of the Democratic Revolution, said he had a considerable advantage in the race against Alfredo Anaya, of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, which ruled Mexico for 71 years.
WORLD
September 18, 2005 | Hector Tobar, Times Staff Writer
Federal and local police swept across Michoacan on Saturday, hunting for the gunmen who assassinated the southern state's head of public safety during a birthday dinner at a crowded restaurant. Rogelio Zarazua Ortega, civilian overseer of Michoacan's police force, was shot Friday night as he sat at a table with two dozen friends and relatives. Also gunned down was one of Zarazua's police bodyguards.
WORLD
June 18, 2007 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
The pork carnitas were served hot and greasy with a side of fresh green chile salsa and a stack of handmade tortillas off a griddle about 20 feet away. Conversation was nearly impossible with the seven-piece mariachi band blasting away tableside, so Jorge Luis Castenada Castillo went ahead and brought the works: cold beer, a pitcher of juice and a bottle of Johnny Walker Black Label Scotch. "How's that?" he said. "Can I get you anything else?"
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Nearly every building was damaged or destroyed. The grammar school was split in two. And the 45-foot bell tower at the Roman Catholic church was bent. As officials reviewed Sunday's aftermath from an earthquake in central Mexico, they found most of the damage concentrated in the Pacific Coast state of Michoacan--particularly in the small town of Arteaga. Nationwide, there were no casualties.
NEWS
September 2, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
Democratic Revolutionary Party militants Friday said they will abandon 71 of the 76 town halls in the central state of Michoacan that they have occupied for the last six weeks to protest alleged fraud in the July state legislature election. Instead, the PRD, as the left-of-center party is called, will begin its campaign for the election of 113 municipal presidents, or mayors, that is to be held in Michoacan in December, Sen. Roberto Robles Garnica announced in Michoacan.
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