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SPORTS
October 13, 2002 | Dan Barreiro, Minnesota Star Tribune
Original ideas are rare. That's what made the Homer Hanky such a stroke of genius. That's also what makes the Rally Monkey so eye-catching and clever. Think of it: In the seventh inning of a tight game, you put a gyrating monkey on the big screen and 44,234 people scream and shout as if Mick Jagger has arrived. As a marketing tool, the whole thing is so dumb it's brilliant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2002 | From Associated Press
They're from different generations and work in different fields. But Gordon Parks and Mick Jagger have something in common this week: Both acknowledged their roots with big donations. Writer and photographer Parks is donating a collection of his work--photographs and poems valued at $100,000--to the new Mercy Health Center, which opened two months ago in his hometown of Fort Scott, Kan. It will be Parks' first exhibition in Fort Scott, about 60 miles south of the Kansas City area.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN
My question for the fortysomething mother and her teenage son at a recent family gathering was simple: Did they want to hear the new Paul McCartney and Mick Jagger solo albums? The mom frowned, aware of the many mediocre solo projects by the two. The son yawned. The youngster showed interest in the Jagger album only after hearing that Bono, Lenny Kravitz and Rob Thomas guest on it. The only name that would have made the mom curious was Keith Richards, who doesn't.
NEWS
August 27, 2001 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He has survived the usual travails of stardom--a drug bust, failed marriages and a paternity suit--but this may be more than an aging rocker can bear: A British magazine for seniors, Saga, has put Mick Jagger on the cover of its September issue. Granted, it is a 5-year-old, softly lit photograph of the Rolling Stones singer sans wrinkles and wearing a boyish blue and pink rugby shirt to highlight his eyes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fans of the Mamas & the Papas are in for a big surprise with the new solo album from group founder and songwriter John Phillips--an album released just weeks after Phillips died of heart failure at 65. In place of the gorgeously complex harmonizing and endearing folk-rock sound that were the Mamas & the Papas' hallmark, Phillips' "Pay Pack & Follow" is a raw, ragged, hard-rocking outing that sounds like a lost album by the Rolling Stones.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2000 | DAVID GRITTEN, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
On most movie sets, it's the star actors who are the center of attention, the ones toward whom all eyes discreetly turn when they walk onto the set. They're usually the subject of cast and crew gossip and speculation, of whispered conversations behind hands. It's rare to find a film where a producer is the focus of such intrigue. But then, it's rare to find a film producer who's also arguably the most charismatic rock star of the last four decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | STEVE HARVEY
You may recall that I mentioned discovering that the city of Los Angeles had 10 bank accounts totaling more than $4,000 on the "unclaimed property" Web site of the secretary of state's office. Well, Tammie Haller of Redondo Beach explored the site and found two unclaimed accounts for Mick Jagger, each containing small payments from Walt Disney. Wait till those right-wing religious critics of Disney learn that the company has a relationship with Mick (not to be confused with Mickey!).
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1999 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With rock and youth so intertwined, folks have been speculating for two decades that each successive Stones tour could just be the last time. Such uncertainty is probably good for ticket sales, but the band's second of two nights at the Arrowhead Pond in Anaheim on Thursday only ratified what Tuesday's show shouted: The Stones will be viable as long as they desire to be. And that desire appears to be flowing strongly enough to carry them well into the next millennium.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1998 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Squeezing decades of rock 'n' roll into a two- or three-hour revue is one daunting task. It has become a habit, though, for music buff and college professor Paul Frizler. The chair of Chapman University's English department has been staging rock 'n' roll revues since the mid-'70s. His latest incarnation, "The Story of Rock 'n' Roll," opened last week and continues Friday through Sunday at the university in Orange.
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