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Mickey Weiss

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NEWS
October 25, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The occasion was a reception Oct. 16 at the Library of Congress honoring Americans whose efforts had been recognized with Presidential End Hunger Awards. Mickey Leland's widow, Alison, was there to accept for the late Texas congressman; the mood was reserved, almost somber. That is, until Mickey Weiss stepped forward to be introduced. As Weiss had listened to the tributes, his eyes had fixed on a stray grape that had fallen to the floor in front of the dais.
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NEWS
May 2, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maurice "Mickey" Weiss, wholesale produce dealer and philanthropist who founded the Charitable Distribution Facility to supply discarded but usable food to kitchens that feed the hungry, died Wednesday. He was 81. Weiss, sometimes called the "mushroom king" for making the item readily available in the Los Angeles area, died of cancer at his West Los Angeles home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989
Los Angeles philanthropist Mickey Weiss and actor Ted Danson were among 13 people honored Monday as "America's outstanding hunger fighters" during a White House ceremony. The recipients were greeted by President Bush and presented with the Presidential End Hunger Award in categories ranging from research and education in the development and provision of food supplies to focusing public attention on hunger.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
"Who can get rid of 1,100 cases of frozen broccoli?" Mickey Weiss asks. When it was offered to him, he was quick to accept. "Don't dump it; donate it" is Weiss' motto. The former produce merchant is the "veggie philanthropist," founder of the L.A. Wholesale Produce Market's Charitable Distribution Facility. Each month the facility gives away 1.5-million pounds of unsalable food--bruised or a bit overripe.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
"Who can get rid of 1,100 cases of frozen broccoli?" Mickey Weiss asks. When it was offered to him, he was quick to accept. "Don't dump it; donate it" is Weiss' motto. The former produce merchant is the "veggie philanthropist," founder of the L.A. Wholesale Produce Market's Charitable Distribution Facility. Each month the facility gives away 1.5-million pounds of unsalable food--bruised or a bit overripe.
NEWS
May 2, 1996 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maurice "Mickey" Weiss, wholesale produce dealer and philanthropist who founded the Charitable Distribution Facility to supply discarded but usable food to kitchens that feed the hungry, died Wednesday. He was 81. Weiss, sometimes called the "mushroom king" for making the item readily available in the Los Angeles area, died of cancer at his West Los Angeles home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | From United Press International
Strawberries that aren't shaped quite right and bananas that aren't the right shade of yellow are finding their way to the tables of soup kitchens through a Los Angeles charity program that donates food good enough to eat but not good enough to sell. Merchants at downtown's wholesale produce market used to throw away boxes of fresh fruit and vegetables they could not sell because the produce was not quite fresh or pretty enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | Researched by CATHERINE GOTTLIEB / Los Angeles Times
California is one of the world's top producers of fruits and vegetables, but thousands of low-income people in the greater Los Angeles area don't get enough fresh produce in their diets. The Los Angeles Charitable Food Distribution Facility has helped to remedy this situation by moving more than 25 million pounds of donated produce annually to organizations that feed the region's poor.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | BEA MAXWELL
Thanks to the foresight and generosity of Edna and Mickey Weiss, founders of the Charitable Distribution Facility at the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market, about 15.4 million pounds of fresh produce were distributed to more than 400 charitable and hunger-relief organizations throughout Los Angeles in 1991. Founded in 1987, it was the first such produce program in the nation. Any nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that feeds the needy or homeless can become eligible for food.
NEWS
June 1, 1995 | CAROL CHASTANG
Meeting a group of fifth-graders from South-Central Los Angeles, thought 10-year-old Leah Metz from Beverly Hills, "would probably be weird at first." But her assumptions were bashed, said the fifth-grader from Temple Emanuel Day School, once she exchanged ideas with some of the students from 75th Street School.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The occasion was a reception Oct. 16 at the Library of Congress honoring Americans whose efforts had been recognized with Presidential End Hunger Awards. Mickey Leland's widow, Alison, was there to accept for the late Texas congressman; the mood was reserved, almost somber. That is, until Mickey Weiss stepped forward to be introduced. As Weiss had listened to the tributes, his eyes had fixed on a stray grape that had fallen to the floor in front of the dais.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989
Los Angeles philanthropist Mickey Weiss and actor Ted Danson were among 13 people honored Monday as "America's outstanding hunger fighters" during a White House ceremony. The recipients were greeted by President Bush and presented with the Presidential End Hunger Award in categories ranging from research and education in the development and provision of food supplies to focusing public attention on hunger.
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | CHRISTINA V. GODBEY
Anna Gaspar of Santa Monica recently retired as a teacher from the Los Angeles Unified School District, but not from teaching. Last week, she left for Namibia to begin working as a Peace Corps volunteer. The 56-year-old Gaspar, who retired from Brockton Elementary School after teaching 32 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District, will work as a teacher in primary education in Namibia's National Primary Education Reform Program.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1986 | LISA A. LAPIN
In Thomas Suriya's two sunset-colored murals, unveiled last week at the official dedication ceremony of the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market, giant shiny apples, avocados and cucumbers emerge from the desert and cascade into an orange crate. The sense of abundance is fitting. Because there's some real volume inside. Twenty-seven fruit and vegetable wholesalers in the fully leased, $90-million facility are already clamoring for more space.
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