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Microorganisms

SCIENCE
April 15, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
In a development unusual in an era when most disease-causing agents have already been found, government researchers have identified a new bacterium that causes a serious lymph node infection in some patients with suppressed immune systems. "The discovery of new bacteria is not uncommon, but discovering an organism that causes human illness is certainly unique," said Dr. Elias A. Zerhouni, director of the National Institutes of Health.
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SCIENCE
October 15, 2005 | From Reuters
A one-celled creature found on a sandy beach might be in the process of kidnapping and incorporating a tinier plant to use as a living energy source, Japanese researchers reported Thursday. They said the newly discovered organism seemed to be in the process of endosymbiosis, in which one creature incorporates another to create a new life form. Scientists believe this is how many plants and animals evolved.
NEWS
January 23, 2005 | Mary Esch, Associated Press Writer
On the far side of the Cascade Lakes, paper birches cling to the craggy flank of Cascade Mountain, rising steeply from the water's edge. The bright white trees once lined the near side of the lakes too, making a lacy curtain between the water and the highway winding through the Adirondack mountain pass. Over the last 30 years, the birches have dwindled until only a few gnarled trees remain. Environmental groups blame road salt for killing the birches.
HEALTH
April 5, 2004 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Any first-grader can tell you that if you don't brush your teeth, creepy sugar "bugs" will take over and cause cavities. But not all of the bugs, or microbes, in the mouth actually affect oral health. And not all of them are bad. A vast and diverse community of microscopic organisms -- including viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa -- thrive in the mouth, scientists are learning. Some of them may play important roles in both preserving health and causing diseases, says Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A biotechnology company will work with the San Diego Zoo to study microorganisms that live in and around endangered species. Diversa of San Diego will work with the zoo's Center for Reproduction of Endangered Species to collect samples of microbial communities from endangered species, such as the black rhino, the company said Monday. The samples will be analyzed and compared to similar samples taken from wild habitats and species.
SCIENCE
March 1, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Researchers at UC Riverside have isolated microorganisms that degrade the widely used pesticide endosulfan. The microorganisms could be used to clean up contaminated soil and water, microbiologist William Frankenberger and his colleagues report in the current issue of the Journal of Environmental Quality. Endosulfan can affect the central nervous system and other organs, and causes birth defects and mutations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Harmless bacteria that break down toxic chemicals are one of the secret weapons behind a more than $50-million cleanup at Naval Base Ventura County that aims to remove decades of poisons and pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Hordes of microorganisms, including viruses and other germs that may harm people or marine life, sail into U.S. ports from abroad every year in the ballast water that keeps ships stable, according to a team from the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md. The study suggests that microorganisms may pose a greater danger than bigger, known invaders in ballast water, such as mussels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2000 | CATHERINE BLAKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Navy began a chemical cleanup Friday that it hopes will eventually lead to a blueprint for other communities across the nation to follow when removing the contaminant MTBE from water sources. The Naval Construction Battalion Center is a test site for various methods of controlling the fast-moving pollutant that was intended to help fuel burn cleaner but has also dirtied ground water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On a dramatic lava rock coastline that draws tourists from around the globe, researchers are mining a new scientific frontier that may help this island state broaden its economic base beyond sun and fun. Scientists at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, just a few miles from the Big Island's luxury resorts, are exploring the humble world of microalgae with an eye toward drug discovery.
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